Old and New Edinburgh

Old and New Edinburgh

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CONTENTS.
PAGE
INTROEUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . J
CHAPTER I.
P R E H I S T O R I C EDINBURGH.
The Site before the Houses-Traces of Early Inhabitants-The Caledonian Tribes-Agricola's Invasion-Subjection of the Scottish Lowlands
-The Rorrao Way-Edinburgh never occupied permanently-Various Roman Remains : Urns, Coins, Busts ; Swords, Spears, ahd
other Weapons-Ancient Coffins-The Camus, or Cath-st,neOrigin of the name " Edinburgh"-Dinas-Eiddyn-The Battle of Catraeth 9
CHAPTER 11.
THE CASTLE OF EDINBURGH.
Of its Origin and remoter History-The Legends concerning it-Ebranke-St. Monena-Def& of the Sawons by King Bridei-King
Edwin-King Grime-The Story of Grime and Bertha of Badlieu-The Starting paint of authentic Edinburgh History-Sr Margaret
-Het Piety and amiable Disposition-Her Chapel-Her Death-Restoration of her Oratory-Her Burial-Donald Bane-King
David 1.-The Royal Gardens, afterwards the Nonh Loch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I4
CHAPTER 111.
CASTLE OF EDINBURGH (continued).
The Legend of the White Hart-Holyrocd Abbey founded--The Monks of the Castrum Puellarum-David I.% numerous Endowments-His
Death-Fergus. Lord of Galloway, dies there-William the Lion-Castle Garrisoned by the English for Twelve Yean-The Castle a
Royal Residence-The War of the Scottish Succession-The ( h t l e in the hands of Edward 1.-Frank's Escalade-The Lbrtres
Dismantled-Again in the hands of the English-Bullock's Stratagem for its Re-caprurr-David's Tower . . . . . . 21
CHAPTER IV.
CASTLE OF EDINBURGH (confinucd).
Progress of the City-Ambassidor of Charles VI.-Edinburgh burned-Henry IV, baffled-Albmy's Prophecy-Laws lrgvdiog the Building
- of Houses-Sumptuary Laws, 1457-Murder of James I.-Coronationof JarncsI1.-Court Intrigues-Lard Chancellor C r i c h t o n - ~ g ~ c e
of the Earl of Douglas-Faction WaR--l'he Castle Resieged--"The Black Dinner"-Edmburgh Walled-Its Strength -Bale-fires . 26
CHAPTER V.
EDINBURGH CASTLE (continued).
James 111. and his haughty Nobilib-Plots of the Duke of Albany and Earl of Mar-Mysterious Death of Mar-Capture and Escape of the
Duke of Altuny-Captivity of James 111.-Richard of Gloucester at Edinburgh-The "Golden Charter" of the City-"The Blue
Blanket"-Accession of James 1V.-Tournamen%" The Seven Sisters of Bothwick "-The " Fldden Wall"-The Reign of Jarnes V.
-" Cleahse the Causeway !"-Edinburgh under the Factions of Nobles-Hertford Attacks the CastltDeath of Mary of Guise-
Queen Mary's Apartments in the CaStle-BLth of James VI. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
CHAPTER VI.
EDINBURGH CASTLE (continued).
The Siege of r573-The City Bombarded from the Castle-Elizabeth's Spy-D~ry's Dispositions for the Siege-Execution of Kirkddy-
Repar of the Ruins-Execution of Mortan-Visit of Charles 1.-Procession to Holymod-Comnation of Charles 1.-The Struggle
against Epiico-Siege of 1640-The Spectre Drummn-Besieged by Cmmwell-Under the Protector-The Restantion-The
Argyles-The Accession of James VI1.-Sentence of the Earl of Argyle-His. clever Escape-Imprisoned lour yms later-The Last
Sleep of ArgylcHis Death-Tolture of Covenaoters-Proclamation of W d l i and Maq-The Siege of 16@-Intewiew between
Gordon and Dundee-The Cas le invested-Rdiant Defeuce-Capitulation of the Duke of Cordon-The Spectre of Claverhouse . 47 ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I4 CHAPTER 111. CASTLE OF EDINBURGH ( continued ). The Legend of the White ...

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functions ; but, unlike that official, these functions
did not become permanently a part of his office.
At the Union the office of Clerk Register was
preserved with all its dignity and emoluments, and
that the records of Scotland should always remain
in that kingdom. '
The salary of the office was abolished between
186r and 1868; but a select committee was so
strongly irr favour of its maintainance, that it was
restored by the 25th section of the Writs' Registration
Act of the latter year.
Under the Act passed together with the Treaty
of Uiiion, no election of representative peers can
47
take place in Scotland without the presence of ,the
Lord Clerk Register.
Perhaps no holder of this important office ren-
' dered better service than the late Sir Wiliiam
well known for his talents, energy, and great
urbanity of manner. He was born in 1797, and
in 1837 represented Midlothian in the Whig interest.
In 1841 he was returned for the city as one
of its representatives along with Lord Macaulay,
and continued to sit till 1852, and ten years after
was appointed Lord Clerk Register and one result
of the careful charge and supervision he took of
his department, was that the histoid documents ... its representatives along with Lord Macaulay, and continued to sit till 1852, and ten years after was ...

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vi OLD AND NEW EDINBURGH.
CHAPTER XXIII. ,
THE HIGH STREET (continued).
PAGR ' The Black Turnpike-Bitter Reception of Quem Mary-Lambie's Bannei-Mary in the Black Turnpike-The House of Fenton-Its
Picturesque Appearance-The House of Bassandyne the Printer, 1574-" Bishop's Land," Town House of AKhbhhop Spottiswood-
Its various Tenants-% Stuart Thriepland-The Town-house of ths Hendersons of Fordel-The Lpdging of the Earls of Crawford-
The First Shop of Allan Rams.g-The Religious Feeling of the People-Ancrum House-The First Shop of .Constable and Co.-
Manners and Millar, Booksellers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 204
- CHAPTER XXV.
THE HIGH STREET (coalinued).
The Neighbourhood of Knox's House-Mmerino Mansion-Singular Accident-The Knos Memorial ChurchSociety CI-John
Knox's House-The '' Preaching Window "-His Wives-Attempted Aqmsination-Last Sermon-Death and Burial-James of
Jerusalem-House of Archbishop Sharp-The Birthplace of W i l l i FaIconef-Old Excise Offices-The Nether Bow Part-The
Earlier Gate-Th; Regent Morton's Surp<se Party-Tne Last Gate-Its Demolition . . . . . . . . . . 212
CHAPTER XXV.
THE HIGH STREET (continued).
Thz Ancient Markets-The House of Adam Bothwell, Bishop of Orkney-The Bishop and Queen Mary-His Sister Anne-Sir William Dick
of Braid-His Colossal Wealth-Hard Furtune-lhe "Lamentable State "-Advocates' Close-Sir lames S.ewart's Holm-Andrew
CroSbie, *' Counsehx Pleydell "-Scougal's House-His Picture Gallery-Roxburgbe Close-Warriston's Close-Lord Philiphaugh's
House-Bmce of Binning's Mansion-Mess=. W. and R. Chambers's Printing and Publishing Establishment--History of the Firm-
House of Sir Thomas Craig-Sir Archibald Johnston of Wariston . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 219
CHAPTER XXVI.
THE HIGH STREET (continued).
M q Rig's Cke-Who was Mary ?-Scourged by the Plague of *s-Its Mystery-Drummond's Epigram-hf. Sirtclaifs 'I Satan's
' Invklble World Discovered $'-MT. and Mrs. Coltheart's Ghostly Visitors-The Close finally abandoned to Goblins-Craig's Close-
Andro Hart, Bookseller and Printer-Andro Hart's Spear-A Menagefie in Craig's ClostThe Isle of Man Arms-The Cape Club-
Its Mysteries and OCcegInstallation of a Knight-Provincial Cape ClubbThe Poker ClukHow it Originated-Membm-
Office-bearc+OId Stamp Office Court-Fortune's Tavern-The beautiful Countess of Eglinton-Her Patronage of Letters-Her
Family-Interview with Dr. Johnson-Murderous Riot in the Close-Removal of the Stamp Office . . . . . . . 227
CHAPTER XXVII.
THE HIGH STREET (continued).
Tie Anchor Close-Dawney Douglas% Taw-The 'a Crnwn Rwm"-The Crochallan Club-Members-Burns among the Crochallan
Fencihles-Smellie's Printing Of5ctDandas's House, Fleshmarket Clo~-Mylne's Squue-Lord Alva's How-The Countess of
Sutherland and Lady Glenorchy-Birthplace of Fergucson-Halkerston's Wynd Port-Kinloch's Close-Carmbber's Close-The
Episcopal Chapel-Clam Shell Land--Captain Matthew Henderson-Allan Ramsay's Theatre-Its later Tenants-The Tailor's Hall-
Bailie Fyfe's Closc-" Heave awa' lads, I'm no deid yet "-Chalmers' Close-Hope's House-Sandiland's Close-Bishop Kennedy's
Housc-Grant's Close-Baron Grant's H-se . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 235
CHAPTER XXVIII.
THE HIGH STREET (continre.l).
The Salamander Land "-The Old Fihmarka Close-Heriot's Mansion-The Decnste<s Hmse-Borthwick's ClostLmd Durie's House
-Old Assembly Rooms-Edinburgh Assemblies, I/ZO-S3-MiSS Nicky Murray-Formalities of the Balls-Ladies' Fashions-Assemblies
Removed to Bell's Wynd-Blair Street and Hunter's Square-Kennedy's Close-George Buchanan's Death--Nidd,y's Wynd-Nicoi
Edwards' House-A Case of Homicide in 1597-A Quack Dacta-Livingstone's Liberty . . . . . . . . . . 24."
,
CHAPTER XXIX.
THE HIGH STREET (confinued.)
Niddry's Wynd --Provast Edwads House-Lmkhart's Court-St. Mary's Chapel-Masonic Lodge Meetings-Vintess Glenorchy-The
Story of Lady Graoge-St. Cecili'. Hall-Its Old-fashioned Concerts-The Belles of the Etghteenth Century-The Name Niddry . 246
. CHAPTER XXX.
THE HIGH STREET (confinued).
Dicksons' and Cant's Closes-The House of the " Scottish Hogarth and the Knight of Tillybole-Rosehaugh's, or Strichen's, Close-House
of the Abbots of Melrose-Sir George Mackenzie of Rosehaugh-Lady Anne Dick-Lord Strichen-The Manners of 1730-Provost
Griey-John Dhu, Corporal of the City Guard-Lady Lovdtk Land-Walter Chapman, Printer-Lady Lovat . . . . . 253 ... AND NEW EDINBURGH. CHAPTER XXIII. , THE HIGH STREET ( continued ). PAGR ' The Black Turnpike-Bitter Reception ...

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iv OLD AND NEW EDINBURGH.
CHAPTER VII.
PAGE
EDINBURGH CASTLE (conclzded). .
The Torture of Neville Payne-Jacobite Plots-Entombing the Regalia-Project for Surprising the Foltress-Right of Sanctuary Abolished
-Lord Drummond's Plot-Some Jacobite Prisoners-'' Rebel Ladies"- James Macgregor-The Castle Vaults-Attempts at Escape-
Fears as to the Destruction of the Crown, Sword, and Sceptre-Crown-room opened in 1794-Again in 1817, and the Regalia brought
forth-Mons Megseneml Description of the whole Castle . . . : . . . . . . . . . . . . 66
CHAPTER VIII. .
THE CA~STLE HILL.
Doyglas-Castle Hill Promenade-Question as to the Proprietary of the Esplanade and Castle Hill . . . . . . . .
The Esplanade or Castle Hill-The Castle Banks-The Celtic Crosses-The Secret Passage and Well house Tower-The Church on the Castle
Hill-The Reservoir-The House of Allan Ramsay-Executions for Treason, Sorcery, &.-The Master of Forbes-Lady Jane
79
CHAPTER IX.
THE CASTLE HILL (conczuded).
'Dr. Guthrie's O~pinal Ragged School-Old Homes in the Street of the Castle Hill-Duke of Gordon's House, Blair's Close-Webster's Close
-Dr. Alex. Webster-Eoswell s Court-Hyndford House-Assembly Hdl-Houses of the Marquis of Argyle, Sir Andrew Kennedy, the
Earl of Cassillis, the Laud of cockpen--Lord Semple's House-Lord Semple-Fah of Mary of Guise-Its Fate . . . . 87
CHAPTER X.
T H E LAWNMARKET.
The Lawnmarket-RiSjt-The Weigh-houstMajor Somerville and captain Crawford-AndeMn's Pills-Myhe's Court-James's Gourt-Sir
John Lauder-Sir Islay Campbell-David Hume--" Cprsica" Boswell-Dr. Johnso-Dr. Blki-" Gladstone's Land "-A Fire in 1771 94
CHAPTER XI.
THE LAWNMARKET (continued).
Lady Stair's Close-Gray of Pittendrum-"Aunt Margaret's M rror"-The Marshal Earl and Countess of Stair-Miss Feme-Sir Richard
Steel-Martha Countess of Kincardine-Bums's Room in Barfer's C1o.e-The Eridges' Shop ih Bank Stxet-Bailie MacMorran's
Story-Sir Francis Grant of Cullen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I02
CHAPTER XII.
THE LAWNMARKET' (continued).
The Story of Deacon Brodie-His Career of Guilt-Hanged on his own Gibbet-Mauchine's Close, Robet? Gourlay's Hoiise and the other
Old Houses therein-The Rank of Scotland, 16~5-Assassination of Sir Gorge hckhart-Taken Red Hand-Punishment of Chiesly I12
CHAPTER XIII.
THE LAWNMARKET (concluded).
Gosford's Close- The Town House of the Abbot of Cambu~kcnncth-Tennant's House-Mansion of the Hays-Liberton's Wynd-Johnnie
Dowie's Tavern-Burns a d His Songs-The Place of Execution-Birthplace of "The Man of Feeling"-The Mirror Club-
Forrester's Wynd-The Heather Stacks in the Houses-Peter Williamn-Beith's Wynd-Habits of the Lawnmarket Woollen
Traders-"Lawnmarket Gazettes "-Melbourne Place-The County Hall-The Signet and Advocates' Libraries . . . . . I I8
CHAPTER XIV.
T H E TOLBOOTH.
Memori-1s of the Heart of Midlothian, or Old Tolbooth-Sir Walter Scott's Description-The Early Tolhth-The "Robin Hod"
Disturbances-Noted Prison-Entries from the Records--Lord Burleigh's Attempts at Escape-The Porteous Mob-The Stories
of Katherine Nairne and of Jam- Hay-The Town Guard-The Royal Bedesmen . . . . . . . . . . . . 12; ... Blki-" Gladstone's Land "-A Fire in 1771 94 CHAPTER XI. THE LAWNMARKET ( continued ). Lady Stair's ...

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Leaving his queen in the then solitary Castle,
Grime (who, according to Buchanan, began his
reign in the year 996) often pursued the pleasures
of the chase among the wilds of Polmood, in the
probably a remnant of Edwin's departed power,
and from this period begins the authentic history
of Edinburgh and its castle, as from that
time it continued to be almost permanently the
Bertha, her aged father, and infant son, and, burying
them in one grave, heaped above it a rough
tumulus, which still marks the spot.
Full of remorse and fear, the queen died before
the return of Grime, who, after defeating the
Danes, and destroying their galleys, hastened to
this invests the solemn event with a peculiar charm.
The grand-niece of Edward the Confessor, she
had fled from her own country on the usurpation of
Harold, but was wrecked on the Forth, at the place
still called Queensferry. She and her retinue
were hospitably entertained by Malcolm III., who
successor, was deserted in battle by his warriors,
taken captive, and, after having his eyes put out,
died in grief and misery in the eighth year of his
reign.
He was succeeded, in 1004, by Maicolm II.,
who had Lothian formally ceded to him by Eadulf-
Cudel, Earl of Northumberland, who had pre-
Viously exercised some right of vassalage over it,
wife, of Malcolm, in the lines spoken hy Macduff,
Macbeth, Act iv., scene 3 :-
" The queen that bore thee,
Oftener upon her knees than on her feet,
Died every day she lived."
In 1091 William Rufus made war on Scotland,
and, taking the castle of Alnwick by surprise,
wantonly put its garrison to the sword. Malcolm.
coat of arms ... Edinburgh and its castle, as from that time it continued to be almost permanently the Bertha, her aged ...

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380 OLD AND NEW EDINBURGH. [South Bridge.
~~ ~~~
mechanics, and such other branches of science as
were necessary in their various crafts, an association
was formed, and with this general object in view
the School of Arts was duly inaugurated on the
16th of October, ISPI, by a meeting at which the
Lord Provost, afterwards Sir William Arbuthnot,
Bart., presided. The two leading classes then
established, and which continue to this day to be
fundamental subjects of education in the school,
were Chemistry and Mechanical or Natural Philosophy.
The first meetings of the school were in a
General Hope, it was resolved that an edifice
should be erected with that view, appropriate to
the name and character of Watt, and that it should
be employed for the accommodation of the School
of Arts and to promote the interests of the class
from which he sprang.
The directors had by them L400, which they
resolved to add as a Subscription for this memorial,
to the end that their school should have a permanent
building of its own ; but it was not till
1851 that arrangements were completed, by which,
SURGEON SQUARE. (Rrom a Drawing by Sh#krd,julZishd zn 1829.)
humble edifice in Niddry Street, but after a time it
was moved to one of the large houses described
in Adam Square.
Continued success attended the school from
its opening; it had the support of all classes of
citizens, particularly those connected with the
learned professions ; the subscription list showing
a sum of ;E450 yearly, and from this the directors,
by thrifty management, were able to put aside money
from time to time, as a future building fund.
For the purpose of erecting a memorial in
honour of James Watt at Edinburgh, a meeting
was held in July, 1824. On thewotion of the
.*Me Lord Cockburn, seconded by the Solicitorinstead
of erecting a new house, the old one in
Adam Square, which had been occupied by the
school for nearly thirty years, was purchased, when
the accumulated fund amounted to ~ 1 , 7 0 0 , and
the directors adding ASoo, obtained the house
for A2,500, after which it took the name of The
Watt /nsfifufion and SchooZ of Arts.
In May, 1854, the directors placed a statue of
James Watt, on a granite pedestal, in the little
square before the school, where both remained
till r871, when the building in Adam Square, which
had become too small for the requirements of the
institution, was pulled down, with those which adjoined
it, to make way for the broad and spacious ... to one of the large houses described in Adam Square. Continued success attended the school from its opening; ...

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CONTENTS. vii
. CHAPTER XXXI.
PAGE ALLEYS OF THE HIGH STREET (continued).
Blackfriars Wynd-The Grant of Alexander 11.-Bothwell slays Si Williiam Stewar-Escape of Archbishop Sharpe-Cameronian Meetinghouse-
The House of the Regent Morton-Catholic Chapels of the Eighteenth Century-Bishop Hay-"No Popery" Riots-
Baron Smith's Chapel-Scottish Episcopalians-House of the Prince of Orkney- Magnificence of Earl Wdliam Sinclair-Cfudinnl
Beaton's House-The Cardinal's Armorial Bearings-Historical Assw$arions of his House-Its Ultimate Occupants-The United
IndusWSchool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 . 258
CHAPTER XXXII.
ALLEYS OF THE HIGH STREET (continued).
Toddrick's Wynd-Banquet to the Danish Ambassador and Nobles-Lord Leven's House in Skinner's Close-The Fim Mint Houses-
The Mint-Scottish Coin-Mode of its Manufacture-Argyle's Lodging-Dr. Cullen-Elphinstone's Court--Lords Laughborough and
Stonefield-Lard Selkirk-Dr. Rutherford, the Inventor of Gas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 266
CHAPTER XXXIII.
ALLEYS OF THE HIGH STREET (concluded).
The House of the Earls of Hyndford-The l'hree Rornps'of Monreith-Anne, Conntess of Balcarris-South Foulid Qosc-The "Endnrylie's
Well"-Fountain Close-The House of Bailie Fullerton-Purchase of Property for the Royal College of Physicians-New
Episcopal Chapel-Tweeddale Close-The House of the Marquis of Tweeddale-Kise of the British Linen Compmy-The Mysterious
Murder of Begbie-The World's End Close-The Stanfield Tragedy-Titled Raidenters in Old Town C h e s . . . . . . 274
CHAPTER XXXIV.
NEW STREETS WITHIN THE AREA OF THE FLODDEN WALL.
Lord Cockburn Street-Lord Cockhnrn-The Scobman Newspaper-Charles Mackren and Alexander Kussel-The Queen's Edinburgh
Rifle Brigade-St. Giles Street-Sketch of the Rise of Journalism in Edinburgh-The Edidurgk Couramt-The Dai& Review-
Jeffrey Street-New Trinity College Church . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 282
CHAPTER XXXV.
NEW STREETS WITHIN THE AREA OF THE FLODDEN WALL (ctmcluded).
Victoria Street and Terrace-The I n d i Buildings-Mechanics' Subscription Libraq-Gwrge IV. Bridge-St. Augustine's Church-Martyrs'
Church-Chamber of the Hqhlandaud Apicnltural Sodety--SheriffCourt Bddbgs a d sohitors' Hall-Johnstone Terace-St. John's
Free Church-The Church of Scotland Training Ihllege . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 291
CHAPTER XXXVI.
ST. MARY'S WYND.
St. Mary's Wynd and Street-Sir David Annand-St. Mary's Cisterdan Conrentand Hospital-Bothwell's Brawl in I+-T?I~ Caagate Port-
Rag Fair-The Ladies of Traquair-Ramsay's "White Horsc '' Inn-Pasqnale de Paoli-Ramsay Retires with a Fortune-Boyd's
'' White Horse" Inn-Patronised by Dr. Johnson-Improvements in the Wynd-Catholic Institute-The Oldest Doorhead in the City 297
CHAPTER XXXVII.
LEITH WYND.
Leith Wynd-Our Lady's Hospital-Paul's Work-The Wall of 1540-ItO Fall in 1854-The "Happy Land"-Mary of Gueldns-Trinity
College Church-Some Particulars of its Charter-Interior View-Decorations-Enlargement of the Establishment-Privileges of
its Ancient Officers-The Duchess of Lennox-Lady Jane Hamilton-Curious Remains-Trinity Hospital-Sir Simon Preston's
" Public Spirit "-Become a Corporation Charity-Description of Buildings-Provision for the Inmates--Lord Cockburn's Female
Pdon-Demolition of the Hospital-Other Charities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 300
CHAPTER XXXVJII.
T H E W E S T B O W .
%e West Bow-Quaint Ciaracter of its Houses-Its Modern Aspact-Houses of the Tunplar Knighrs-The Bowfoot Well-The Bow
Port-The Bow-head-Major Weir's Land-History of Major Thomas WeL-Personal Appearance-His Powdd Prayers-The 'I Holy
Sisters "-The Bowhead Saints-Weir's Reputed Compact with the Devil-Sick-bed Confession-ht-Search of his House--Prison
Confession-Trial of Him and His Sister Grizel-Execution-What was Weir ?-His Sister undoubtedly Mad-Terrible Reputation of
the Houw-Untenanted for upwards of a Century-Patullo's Experience of a Cheap Lodging-Weir's Land Improd Out of Existence
-Hall of the Knights of St. John-A Mysterious House-Samerville Mmsion-The Assembly Rooms--Opposed by the Bigotry of
the Times-The LPdy-Directress-Curioua Regulations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .309 ... vii . CHAPTER XXXI. PAGE ALLEYS OF THE HIGH STREET ( continued ). Blackfriars Wynd-The Grant of Alexander ...

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OLD -4NU NEW EDINBURGH. ... v11t
CHAPTER XXXIV.
INCHKEITH.
PAGE
The Defences of Leith-Inchkeith Forts-%. Serf-The Pest-stricken in 1497-Experiment of James lV.-The Old Fort-Johnson and
Boswell-The New Chanuel -Colonel Moggridge's P l a n j T h e 'I hree New Forts-Magazines and Barracks-The Lighthouse . . 290
CHAPTER XXXV.
NEWHAVEN.
Cobbett on Edinburgh-Jam- IV.'s Dockyard -His Gift of Newhaven to Edinburgh-The GYCQ~ Michapl-Embarkation of Mary of Guise
-Woc.ks at Newhaven in the Sixteenth Century-The Links-Viscount Newhaven-The Feud with Prestonpans-The Sea Fencibles
--Chain Pier-Dr. Fairhirn-The E ishwives-Superstitions . , . . . , . . . . . . . . . 295
CHAPTER XXXVI.
WARDIE, TRINITY, AND GRANTO~.
Wardie Muir-Human Remqins Found-Bangholm Bower and Trinity Lodge-Christ Church, Trinity-Free Church, Granton Road-Pilton
-Royston-Caroline Park-Granton-The Piers and Harhuun-Morton's Patent Slip , . . . . . . , . . 306
CHAPTER XXXVII.
THE ENVIRONS OF EDINBURGH.
Cramond-Origin of the Name-Cramond of that Ilk-Ancient Charters - Inchmickery-Lord Cramond--Bdrnton -Goer and its Proprietors-
Saughton Hall--Riccarton . . . . . . , . . . . . . . , . . . , . . 3'4
CH AI'TE R XXXVI 11.
THE EXVIRONS OF EDINBURGH (confinzed).
Colinton-Ancient Name and Church-Redhall-The Family of Foulis-Dreghom -The Pentlands-View from Tqhin-Comiston-Slateford-
Grnysmill-Liberton -The Mill at Nether Liberton-Liberton Tower-The Chiirch-The Balm Well of St. Katherine-Grace
Mount-The Wauchopes of Niddrie-Niddrie House-St Katherine's-The Kaime-Mr. Clement Little-Lady Little 01 Lihrton . 322
CHAPTER XXXIX.
THE EXVIRONS OF EDINBURGH (continued).
Cnrrie-Origin of the Name-Roman Camps-The Old Church and Temple Lands-Lennox Tower-Curriehill Castle and the Skenes-
Scott of Malleny-James Andelson, LL.D.--"Camp Meg" and her Story . . . . . . . . . . , . 130
CHAPTER XL.
THE ENVIRONS OF EDIXBURGH (coalinued).
The Inch House-The WinramcEdmonstone and the Edmon.;tones of ttat Ilk-Witches-Woolmet-The Stenhouse-Moredun-The
' .338 Stewarts of Goodtrees-The Buckstane-Burdiehoux-Its Limekilns and Fossils . . . . , I . . . , . ... . 322 CHAPTER XXXIX. THE EXVIRONS OF EDINBURGH ( continued ). Cnrrie-Origin of the Name-Roman Camps-The ...

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OLD -4NU NEW EDINBURGH. ... v11t
CHAPTER XXXIV.
INCHKEITH.
PAGE
The Defences of Leith-Inchkeith Forts-%. Serf-The Pest-stricken in 1497-Experiment of James lV.-The Old Fort-Johnson and
Boswell-The New Chanuel -Colonel Moggridge's P l a n j T h e 'I hree New Forts-Magazines and Barracks-The Lighthouse . . 290
CHAPTER XXXV.
NEWHAVEN.
Cobbett on Edinburgh-Jam- IV.'s Dockyard -His Gift of Newhaven to Edinburgh-The GYCQ~ Michapl-Embarkation of Mary of Guise
-Woc.ks at Newhaven in the Sixteenth Century-The Links-Viscount Newhaven-The Feud with Prestonpans-The Sea Fencibles
--Chain Pier-Dr. Fairhirn-The E ishwives-Superstitions . , . . . , . . . . . . . . . 295
CHAPTER XXXVI.
WARDIE, TRINITY, AND GRANTO~.
Wardie Muir-Human Remqins Found-Bangholm Bower and Trinity Lodge-Christ Church, Trinity-Free Church, Granton Road-Pilton
-Royston-Caroline Park-Granton-The Piers and Harhuun-Morton's Patent Slip , . . . . . . , . . 306
CHAPTER XXXVII.
THE ENVIRONS OF EDINBURGH.
Cramond-Origin of the Name-Cramond of that Ilk-Ancient Charters - Inchmickery-Lord Cramond--Bdrnton -Goer and its Proprietors-
Saughton Hall--Riccarton . . . . . . , . . . . . . . , . . . , . . 3'4
CH AI'TE R XXXVI 11.
THE EXVIRONS OF EDINBURGH (confinzed).
Colinton-Ancient Name and Church-Redhall-The Family of Foulis-Dreghom -The Pentlands-View from Tqhin-Comiston-Slateford-
Grnysmill-Liberton -The Mill at Nether Liberton-Liberton Tower-The Chiirch-The Balm Well of St. Katherine-Grace
Mount-The Wauchopes of Niddrie-Niddrie House-St Katherine's-The Kaime-Mr. Clement Little-Lady Little 01 Lihrton . 322
CHAPTER XXXIX.
THE EXVIRONS OF EDINBURGH (continued).
Cnrrie-Origin of the Name-Roman Camps-The Old Church and Temple Lands-Lennox Tower-Curriehill Castle and the Skenes-
Scott of Malleny-James Andelson, LL.D.--"Camp Meg" and her Story . . . . . . . . . . , . 130
CHAPTER XL.
THE ENVIRONS OF EDIXBURGH (coalinued).
The Inch House-The WinramcEdmonstone and the Edmon.;tones of ttat Ilk-Witches-Woolmet-The Stenhouse-Moredun-The
' .338 Stewarts of Goodtrees-The Buckstane-Burdiehoux-Its Limekilns and Fossils . . . . , I . . . , . ... . 322 CHAPTER XXXIX. THE EXVIRONS OF EDINBURGH ( continued ). Cnrrie-Origin of the Name-Roman Camps-The ...

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OLD -4NU NEW EDINBURGH. ... v11t
CHAPTER XXXIV.
INCHKEITH.
PAGE
The Defences of Leith-Inchkeith Forts-%. Serf-The Pest-stricken in 1497-Experiment of James lV.-The Old Fort-Johnson and
Boswell-The New Chanuel -Colonel Moggridge's P l a n j T h e 'I hree New Forts-Magazines and Barracks-The Lighthouse . . 290
CHAPTER XXXV.
NEWHAVEN.
Cobbett on Edinburgh-Jam- IV.'s Dockyard -His Gift of Newhaven to Edinburgh-The GYCQ~ Michapl-Embarkation of Mary of Guise
-Woc.ks at Newhaven in the Sixteenth Century-The Links-Viscount Newhaven-The Feud with Prestonpans-The Sea Fencibles
--Chain Pier-Dr. Fairhirn-The E ishwives-Superstitions . , . . . , . . . . . . . . . 295
CHAPTER XXXVI.
WARDIE, TRINITY, AND GRANTO~.
Wardie Muir-Human Remqins Found-Bangholm Bower and Trinity Lodge-Christ Church, Trinity-Free Church, Granton Road-Pilton
-Royston-Caroline Park-Granton-The Piers and Harhuun-Morton's Patent Slip , . . . . . . , . . 306
CHAPTER XXXVII.
THE ENVIRONS OF EDINBURGH.
Cramond-Origin of the Name-Cramond of that Ilk-Ancient Charters - Inchmickery-Lord Cramond--Bdrnton -Goer and its Proprietors-
Saughton Hall--Riccarton . . . . . . , . . . . . . . , . . . , . . 3'4
CH AI'TE R XXXVI 11.
THE EXVIRONS OF EDINBURGH (confinzed).
Colinton-Ancient Name and Church-Redhall-The Family of Foulis-Dreghom -The Pentlands-View from Tqhin-Comiston-Slateford-
Grnysmill-Liberton -The Mill at Nether Liberton-Liberton Tower-The Chiirch-The Balm Well of St. Katherine-Grace
Mount-The Wauchopes of Niddrie-Niddrie House-St Katherine's-The Kaime-Mr. Clement Little-Lady Little 01 Lihrton . 322
CHAPTER XXXIX.
THE EXVIRONS OF EDINBURGH (continued).
Cnrrie-Origin of the Name-Roman Camps-The Old Church and Temple Lands-Lennox Tower-Curriehill Castle and the Skenes-
Scott of Malleny-James Andelson, LL.D.--"Camp Meg" and her Story . . . . . . . . . . , . 130
CHAPTER XL.
THE ENVIRONS OF EDIXBURGH (coalinued).
The Inch House-The WinramcEdmonstone and the Edmon.;tones of ttat Ilk-Witches-Woolmet-The Stenhouse-Moredun-The
' .338 Stewarts of Goodtrees-The Buckstane-Burdiehoux-Its Limekilns and Fossils . . . . , I . . . , . ... . 322 CHAPTER XXXIX. THE EXVIRONS OF EDINBURGH ( continued ). Cnrrie-Origin of the Name-Roman Camps-The ...

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C0NTENTS.
CHAPTER I.
THE CANONGATE.
@AGE
I& Origin-Songs concerning it-Reaords-Market Cross-St. John's and the G i h Crosses-Early History-The Town of Her-
Canongate Paved-The Governing Body-Raising the Devil-Purchase of the Earl of Roxbwgh's "Superiority"-The Foreign
Settlement-George Heriot the Elder-Huntly's HouseSu Walter Scott's Story of a Fire--The Mo- Land-How of Oliphant
of Newland, Lord David Hay, and Earl of Angus-Jack's Land-Shoemaker's Lands-Marquis of Huntly's House-Nisbet of Duleton'd
Mansion-Golfers' Land-John and Nicol Paterson-The Porch and Gatehouse of the Abbey-Lucky Spellcc . . . . . . I
CHAPTER 11.
THE CANONGATE (continwd).
Execution of the Marquis of Montrose-The First Dromedary in Scotland-The streets Cleansed-Raxbugh House--London Stages of r71a
and 175+-Religious Intolerance-Declension of the Burgh . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
CHAPTEK 111.
THE CANONGATE (con#i+vwd).
Closes and AlleF on the North Side-Fiesh-market and Coull's Cloxs-Canongate High School-&e's Close--Riillach's Lodging-New
Street and its Residents-Hall of the Shoemakers-Sir Thos Ddyell-The Canongate Workhouse-Panmure HousbHannah
Robertson-The White Horse Hostel-% Water Gate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
CHAPTER IV.
THE CANONGATE (continued).
Closes and Alleys on the South Side-Chessel's Court-The Canongate Theatre-Riots Therein-"Douglas" Performed-Mr. Diggea and Mra.
Bellamy-St. John's Close-St. John's Street and iks Residents-The Haaunennan's Clo~-Horse Wynd, Abbey-House of Lord Napier 22
CHAPTER V.
THE CANONGATE (roniinued).
Separate or Detached Edifices therein-Sir Walter Scott in the Canongate--The Parish C%urch-How it came to be built-Its Official
Position- Its Burying Ground-The Grave of Fergusson-Monument to Soldiers interred the-Ecceotric Henry PrentiaThe
Tolbth-Testimony as to its Age-Its latu uses-Magdakne Asylum-Linen Hall-Many House-Its Hstorical Associari ons-The
WiotooXo-Whiteford Howe-The Dark Story of Queuriberry House . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 7
CHAPTER VI.
THE CANONGATE (coduded).
mthiin H u t - M PalmerstowSt. Thomas's Hospita-The Tennis Court and its Theawe4&wen Mq's --The Houxr of Croftan-
Righandclock-mill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
CHAPTER ' VII.
HOLYROOD ABBEY.
Foundation of the Ahbey-Text of King David's Charter-Original Extent of the Abbey Char&-The sc-alled Miracdau b - T h e
Pawnages of the Canons-Its Tbirtyanc Abbots-Its Relics and Revenues . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 ... Water Gate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 CHAPTER IV. THE CANONGATE ( continued ). Closes and Alleys on the ...

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iv OLD AND NEW EDINBURGH. -
CHAPTER VI.
THE VALLEY OF THE WATER OF LEITH.
PAGE
Lady Sinclair of Dunbeath-Bell's Mills-Water of Leith Village-Mill at the Dean-Tolbwth there-Old Houses-The Dean and Poultry
-Lands thereof-The Nisbet Family-A Legend-The Dean Village-Belgrave Crescent-The Parish Church-Stewart's Hospital-
Orphan Hospita-John Watson's Hospital-The Dean Cemetery-Notable Interments there . . . . . . . . . 62
CHAPTER VII.
VALLEY OF THE WATER OF LEITH (continued).
The Dean Bridge-Landslips at Stockbridge-Stone Coffins-Floods in the Leith-Population in ~74z-St. Bernard's Estate-Rods Tower-
" Chritopher North " in Aune Street-De Quincey there-St. Bernard's Well-Cave at Randolph Cliff-Veitchs Square-Churches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . in the Locality-Sir Henry Raeburn-Old Deanhaugh House ' 70
CHAPTER VIII.
VALLEY OF THE WATER OF LEITH (concluded).
E.niiuent Men connected with Stockbridge-David Robert7. RA.--K Macleay, R.S.A.-James Browne, LL.D.-James Hogg-Sir J. Y.
Simpson, Bart. -Leitch Ritchie-General Mitchell-G. R. Luke-Comely Bank-Fettes Collegc--Craigleith Quarry-Groat Hall-Silver
Mills-St. Stephen's Church-The Brothers Lauder-Jam- Drummond, R.S.A.-Deaf and -Dumb Institution-Dean Bank Institution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . -The Edinburgh Academy -78
CHAPTER IX.
CANONMILLS AND INVERLEITH.
CanonmillgThe Loch-Riots of 1784-The Gymnasium-Tanfield HalL-German Church-Zoological Gardens-Powder Hall-Rosebank
Cemetery-Red BraesThe Crawfords of Jordanhill-Bonnington-Bishop Keith-The Sugar Refinery-Pilrig-The Balfour Family-
Inverleith-Ancient ProprietorsThe Touris-The Rocheids-Old Lady Inverleith-General Crocket-Royal Botanical GardensMr.
JamesMacNab. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
CHAPTER X.
THE WESTERN NEW TOWN.
Coltbridge-Roseburn House-Traditions of it-Murrayfield-Lord Henderland-Beechwood-General Leslie-The Dundaxs-Ravelston-
The Foulises and Keiths-Craigcrook-Its fint Proprietors-A Fearful Tragedy-Archibald Constable-Lord Jeffrey-Davidson's
Mains-LauristonCastle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .IOZ
CHAPTER XI,
C O R S T O R P H I N E .
ContorphintSupposed Origin of the N a m t T h e Hill-James VI. hunting there-The Cross-The Spa-The Dicks of Braid and con^
phine-" Contorphine Cream '%onvalerent House-A Wraith-The Original Chapel-The Collegiate Church-Its Provosts-Its
Old Tombs-The Castle and Loch of Cohtorphine-The Forrester Family . . . . . . . . . . . . . I 12
CHAPTER XII.
rHE OLD EDINBURGH CLUBS.
Of Old Clubs, and some Notabilia of Edinburgh Life in the Last Century-The Horn Order-The Union Club-Impious Clubs--Assembly
of Birds-The Sweating Club-The Revolution and certain other Clubs-The Beggars' Benison -The Capillaim Club-The Industrious
Company-The Wig, Exulapian, Boar, Country Dinner, The East India, Cape, Spendthrift, Pious, Antemanurn, Six Feet, and
Shakespeare Clubs-Oyster Cellars-" Frolics "-The "Duke of Edinburgh" . . . . . . . . . . . . 122 ... . . . . 62 CHAPTER VII. VALLEY OF THE WATER OF LEITH ( continued ). The Dean Bridge-Landslips at ...

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Tron Church.
sum had been paid but once in ten years, yet, if it
had been properly managed, the accumulated sum
behoved to have exceeded ~16,000 sterling."
The old spire had been partially built'of wood
covered with lead, according to a design frequently
repeated on public buildings then in Scotland. It
was copied from the Dutch ; but the examples of it
are rapidly disappearing. A bell, which cost 1,490
merks Scots, was hung in it in 1673, and continued
weekly to summon the parishioners to prayer and
-
EXPLANATION.
A The principal Entry.
B The mea 01 thrSyuare.
C The Piazza,
I3 The Coffee-room inthe west Coffec-hare.
d Rwnis aod Closets in diLlp.
a The Coffee-mm in the middk Ccffec
e Rmpis and Closets in ditm.
F The Coffee-room in the la t Coffeehoux.
f Raoms io ditto.
G The Great Sair leadiog to the Custon
H The P a q e Ieadioi 10 ditt-.
I 'An open for 1etriI.g in li6ht to the Houses
in the Writer's Court under the level of
the Square.
E The Passage belwecn the Square and
Wriicr's Court.
1. Seven Shops withiu the Square
m Four Shops behi d the raqe tvthe srect.
N Ten Shop an a line with the street.
0 An open of four feet for dcoopirg eaws
P Part ot the M'riter-5 Court.
g Area of ditto.
house. -
H0"W.
of the neighbouring houses
B
pounds yearly. It is an edifice of uninteresting
appearance and nondescript style, being neither
Gothic nor Palladian, but a grotesque mixture of
both. It received its name from its vicinity to the
Tron, or public beam for the weighing of merchandise,
which stood near it.
A very elegant stone spire, which was built in
1828, replaces that which perished in the great
conflaggation of four years before.
The Tron beam appears to have been used as
GENERAL PLAN OF THE ROYAL EXCHANGE. (Frmn an Engraviw in fhe "Scofs Mafizzine" fm 1754.)
sermon till the great fire of 1824, when it was
partly melted by heat, and fell with a mighty crash
through the blazing ruins of the steeple. Portions
of it were made into drinking quaighs and similar
memorials.
In 1678 the tower was completed by placing
therein the old clock which had formerly been in
the Weigh House.
Towards the building of this church the pious
Lady Yester gave 1,000 merks. In 1703 the
magistrates appointed two persons to preach alternately
in the Tron Church, to each of whom they
gave a salary of forty guineas, as the Council Re-,
gister shows ; but about 1788 they contented themselves
with one preacher, to whom they gave fifty
a pillory for the punishment of crime. In Niccol's
'' Diary" for 1649, it is stated that " much falset
and cheitting was daillie deteckit at this time by
the Lords of Sessioune; for the whilk there was
daillie nailing of lugs and binding of people to the
Trone, and boring of tongues; so that it was a
fatal year for false notaries and witnesses, as daillie
experience did witness."
On the night of Monday, the 15th of November,
1824, about ten o'clock, the cry of "Fire ! " was
heard in the High Street, and it spread throughout
the city from mouth to mouth ; vast crowds came
from all ,quarters rushing to the spot, and columns
of smoke and flame were seen issuing from the
second *floor of e house at the head of the old ... which cost 1,490 merks Scots, was hung in it in 1673, and continued weekly to summon the parishioners to ...

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CON TENTS. V
CHAPTER XIII.
THE DISTRICT OF RESTALRIG.
PAGE
Abbey Hill-Baron Norton-Alex. Campbell and 'I Albjm's Anthology "--Comely Gardens-Easter Road-St. Margaret's Wellxhurch
and Legend of St. Tnduana-Made Collegiate bv James 111.-The Mausoleum-Old Barons of Restalrig-The Logans, &c-
Conflict of Black Saturday-Residents of Note-First Balloon in Britain-Rector Adams-The Nisbeb of Craigantinnie and Dean
-The Millers-The Craixantinnie Tomb and Marbles-The Marionville Tragedy-The Hamlet of Jock's Lodge-Mail-bag Robberies
in Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries-Piemhill House and Barracks. . . . . . . . . . . . . I 27
CHAPTER XIV.
PORTOBELLO.
Portobell~The Site before the Houses-The Figgate Muir--ctone Coffiqs-A Meeting with Cramwell-A Curious Race-Portobello Hut-
Robbers-William Jamieson's Feuing-Sir W. Scott and "The Lay "-Portobello Tower-Review of Yeomanry and Highlanders-
Hugh Miller-David Lamg-Joppa-Magdalene Bridge-Rrunstane House . . . . . . . . . . . . I43
CHAPTER XV.
LEITH WALK.
A Pathway in the 15th Century probable-Genera1 Leslie's Trenches-Repulse of Cramwell-The Rood Chapel-Old Leith Stazes-Propsal
for Lighting the Walk-The Gallow Lea-Executions there-The Minister of Spott- Five Witches-Five Covenanters-The Story of
their Skulls-The Murder of Lady Baillie-The Effigies of "Johnnie Wilkes" . . . . . . . . , . . 150
CHAPTER XVI.
LEITH WALK (conchfed).
East Side-Captain Haldane of the Tabernacle-New Road to Haddington -Windsor Street-Mrs H. Siddons -Lovers' Loan-Greenside
House-Andrew Macdonald. the Author of" Vimonda "-West Side-Sir J. Whiteford of that Ilk-Gayfield House-Colonel Crichton
--Prince Leopold-Lady Maxwell-Lady Nairne-SFr;ngfield-McCulloch of Ardwell and Samuel Foote . . . . . ' 157
CHAPTER XVII.
LEITH-HISTORICAL SURVEY.
Origin of the Name-Boundaries of South and North Leith-Links of North Leith-The Town frrst mentioned in History--King Robert's
Charter-Superiority of the Logans and Magistrates of Edinburgh-Abbot Ballantyne's Bridge and Chapel-Newhaven given to
Edinburgh by Jam- 1V.-The Port of 153c-The Town Burned by the English . . . . , . . . . . - . 164
CHAPTER XVIII.
LEITH-HISTORICAL SURVEY (continued).
The Great Siege-Arrival of the French-The Fortifications-Re-capture of Inchkeith-The Town Invested-Arrival of the English Fleet
and Army-Skirmishes-Opening of the BatteriesFailure of the Great Assault-Queen Regent's Death-Treaty of Peace-Relics of
thesiege . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .r7o
CHAPTER XIX.
LEITH-HISTORICAL SURVEY (catinued).
rhc Fortifications demolished-Landing of Queen Mary-Leith Mortgaged-Edinburgh takes Military Pasession of it-A Convention-A
Plague-James VI. Departs and Returns -Witches-Cowrie Con%pkacy-The Union Jack-Pirates-Taylor the Water Poet-
A Fight in the Harbour-Death of Jamer VI. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . , 178 ... Burned by the English . . . . , . . . . . - . 164 CHAPTER XVIII. LEITH-HISTORICAL SURVEY ( continued ). The ...

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One of her chief intimates was the unfortunate
Lady Jane Douglas of Grantully, the heroine of
the long-contested Douglas cause. She
contemplated the approach of her own
death with perfect calmness, and in
anticipation of her coming demise had
all her grave-clothes ready, and the ,
turnpike stair whitewashed. When
asked by her only son, Archibald
(before mentioned), if she wished to
be put in the family burial vault at
Beaufort, in Kilmorack, she replied, I
Indeed, Archie, ye needna put your- '
sel' to any fash aboot me, for I
carena' though ye lay me aneath that ,
hearthstane."
She died in her house at the Wynd
head, in 1796, in the eighty-sixth
year of her age. The old Scottish
&ling-pin of her house door is now
preserved in the Museum of the '
Scottish Antiquarian Society.
Lovat, who died a Lieutenant-General
in 1782, was a man of irreproachable
character, who inherited nothing of
old Lovat's nature but a genius for
Her stepson, Sirnon, Master of TIRLISO-PIN, FKOM LADY
LOVAT'S HOUSE, BLACKFRIARS
WYND.
(From *hsco*tish M?,srum.)
service in America. The rapidity with which the
ranks of previous Highland regiments, raised by
making fine speeches. He raised the Fraset
Highlanders, or old 71st regiment, which was
disbanded in 1783, after a career of brilliant
the bloody brawl between the Earl of Bothwell
and Sir William Stewart of Monkton.
Between these two a quarrel had taken place in
him in 1757, were filled by Frasers,
so pleased George III., that on the
embodiment of the 71st he received
from the king a free grant of his
family estates of Lovat, which had
been forfeited by his father's attainder
after Culloden.
At the first muster of the 71st in
Glasgow, an old Highlander, who had
brought a son to enlist, and was looking
on, shook the general's hand with that
familiarity so common among clansmen,
and said, " Simon, you are a good
soldier, and speak like a man ! While
you live old Simon of Lovat will never
die "-alluding to his close resemblance
personally to his father, the
wily old lord of the memorable "Fortyfive."
Blackfriars Wynd, which has now
become a broad street, has many
a stirring memory of the great and
powerful, who dwelt there in ages
past j hence it is that Sir Alexander
Boswell wrote-
" What recollections rush upon my mind,
Of Lady Stair's Close and BZackfk'ws Wynd!
There once our nobles, and here judges dwelt ."
CHAPTER XXXI.
ALLEYS OF THE HIGH STREET (continued:.
Blackfriars Wynd-The Grant of Alexander 11.-Bothwell slays S'r Williiam Stem-Escape of Archbishop Shar&Cameronian Meeting
house-The House of the Regent Morton-Catholic Chapels of the Eighteenth Century-Bishop Hay-" No Popery *' Riots-Baron
Smith's Chapel-Scottish Episcopalians -House of the Prince of Orkney- Magnificence of Earl William Sinclair-Cardinal Beaton's
House-The Cardinal's Armorial Bearing-Historical Associations of his HouscIts Ultimate Occupants-The United Industrial School.
A BROAD $end (AngZic6 archway), leading through
the successor to the tenement in which Lady Lovat
dwelt, gave access to the Blackfriars Wynd, which,
without doubt, was one of the largest, most important,
and ancient of the thoroughfares diverging
from the High Street, and which of old was named
the Preaching Friar's Vennel, as it led towards the
Dominican monastery, or Black Friary, founded
by Alexander II., in 1230, on the high ground
beyond the Cowgate, near where the Old Infirmary
stands. The king gave the friars-among
whom he resided for some time-with many other
endowments, a grant of the whole ground now
occupied by the old wynd and modern street, to
erect houses, and for five centuries these edifices ... once our nobles, and here judges dwelt ." CHAPTER XXXI. ALLEYS OF THE HIGH STREET ( continued ...

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... Vlll OLD' AND NEW EDINBURGH.
CHAPTER XXXIX.
, T H E W E S T B 0 W (conclud-d.) PAGE
A Hand to Hand Combat in the Bow-Murder'in 1h5 in the Bow-The House of Lord Ruthven-The Hidden Sword-Processions in the
Bow-The Jacobite Prisoners-House of Provost Stewart-A Secret Entertainment to Prince Charles-Donaldson the Printer-State of
Printing and Publishing in his Day-The Edimburck Adwcrfiser-Splendid Fortunc of his Descendant-Town House ,of the
Napiers of Wrightshouse-Trial of Barbara Napier for Witchcdt-Clcckmaker's Land-Paul Romieu-The Mahogany Land-
Duncan Campbell, Chirurgeon-Templar Houses
.
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 315
CHAPTER XL.
E D I N B U R G H I N 1745.
Pmvost Stewart-Advance of the Jacobite Clans-Preparations far DefenctCapturc of the City-Lachiel's Surp&-Entance of Prince
Charles-Arrival at Holyrood-JamesVIII. Proclaimed at the Cross-Conduct of the Highland Tmps in the City-Colquhoun Grant-
A Triumphal ProcessiOn--Guest's Council of War-Preston's Fidelity . . . . . . . . . . . . . jZZ
CHAPTER XLI.
EDINBURGH IN 1745 (concluded),
General Guest's "Brave~~"-Popularity of the Prince-Castle Blockaded-It Fires on the City-Leith Bombarded-End of the Blockade
-Departure of the Highland Army for ' England-Prisoners in the Castle-Macdonald of Teindreich-Duke of Cumberland in
Ediiburgh-Burning of the Standards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 329
CHAPTER XLII.
T H E NORTH BRIDGE.
The New Town projected by Jams VIL-The North Bridge and other Structures by the Earl of Mar, 1728-Oppased in 175g-Foundation
Stone Laid-Erection Delayed till 1$5-Henderson's Plan-William Mylne appointed Architect-Terms of the Contract-Fall of the
Bridge-Repired and Completed--The Upper and Lower Flesh-Markets-Old Post OffictAdam Black-Ann Street-The Ettrick
Shepherd and the .. Nocks"-The Bridge Widened . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 334
CHAPTER XLIII.
EAST SIDE OF THE NORTH BRIDGE.
Dingwall's Castle-Whitefield's " Preachings "-History of the Old Theatre Royal-The Building-David Ross's Management-Leased to
Mr. Foote-Then to Mr. Digges-Mr. Moss-Mrs. Yates-Next Leased to Mr. Jackson-The Siddons Ram-Reception of the Great
Actress-Mrs. Baddeley-New Patent-the playhouse Riot--"The Scottish Roscius"-A Ghost-Expiry of the Patent . . . 340
CHAPTER XLIV..
EAST SIDE OF THE NORTH BRIDGE (continued).
Old Theatre Royal-Management of Mr. Henry Siddons-Mr. Mumy-Miss O'Neill-Production of Rd Roy-Visit of George IV. to the
Theatre- Eoinburgh Theatrical Fund-Scott and his Novels-Retirement of Mr. Mumy-The Management of Mr. and ME.
Wyndham-The Closing Night of the Theatre . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 348
CHAPTER XLV.
EAST SIDE OF THE NORTH BRIDGE (codinwed).
Memorabilia of the General Post Office-First Postal Svstem in Scotland-First Communication with Irdand-Sanctions given by the Scottish
Parliament-Expenses of the Establkhment at various Periods-The Horse Posts-Violation of Letter Bags-Casualties of the Period-
The First Stage Coach-Peter Willison-The Various Post Ofice Buildings--The Waterloo Place Office-Royal Arms Removed-
New 06ce Built-Staffand F d Details . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .353
CHAPTER XLVI.
EAST SIDE OF THE NORTH BRIDGE (concluded).
The Old Orphan Hospital-It5 Foundation, Object, and Removal-Lady Glenorchy's Chapel-Her Disputes with the Presbytery-Dr. Snell
JonesDemolition of the Chapel and School-Old PhysiC Gardens Formed-The Gardens-& Andrew Balfour-James Suthe.-land-
. Inundatedin ~~Sutherland5EffortstoImprovetheGardens-ProfessorHope . . . . . . . . . . . 359 ... Ghost-Expiry of the Patent . . . 340 CHAPTER XLIV.. EAST SIDE OF THE NORTH BRIDGE ( continued ). Old ...

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140 OLD AND NEW EDINBURGH. [St. Giles's Church.
establishment, and Maitland gives us a roll of the
forty chaplaincies and altarages therein.
An Act of Council dated twelve years before
this event commemorates the gratitude ,of the
citizens to one who had brought from France a
relic of St. Giles, and, modernised, it runs thus :-
*' Be it kenned to all men by these present letters,
we, the provost, bailies, counselle and communitie
of the burgh of Edynburgh, to be bound
and obliged to William Prestoune of Gourton, son
and heir to somewhile iVilliam Prestoune of Gourton,
and to the friends and sirname
of them, that for so much
that William Prestoune the
father, whom God assoile, made
diligent labour, by a high and
mighty prince, the King of
France (Charles VII.), and
many other lords of France, for
getting the arm-bone of St. Gile,
the which bone he freely left to
our mother kirk of St. Gile of
Edinburgh, without making any
condition. We, considering the
great labour and costs that he
made for getting thereof, promise
that within six or seven years,
in all the possible and goodly
haste we may, that we shall
build an aisle forth from our
Ladye aisle, where the said William
lies, the said aisle to be
begun within a year, in which
aisle there shall be brass for his
lair in bost (it., for his grave in
embossed) work, and above the
brass a writ, specifying the
bringing of that Rylik by him
into Scotland, with his arms, and
his arms to be put in hewn
church of his name in the Scottish quarter of
Bruges, and on the 1st of September is yearly
borne through the streets, preceded by all thedrums
in the garrison.
To this hour the arms of Preston still remain in
the roof of the aisle, as executed by the engagement
in the charter quoted; and the Prestons
continued annually to exercise their right of bearing
the arm of the patron saint of the city until
the eventful year 1558, when the clergy issued
forth for the last time in solemn procession on
the day of his feast, the 1st
SEAL OF ST. G1LES.t (A ffw Henry Lain&.
work, in three other parts of the aisle, with book
and chalice and all other furniture belonging
thereto. Also, that we shall assign the chaplain
of whilome Sir William of Prestoune, to sing at the
altar from that time forth. . . . . Item, that
as often as the said Rylik is borne in the year,
that the sirname and nearest of blood of the said
William shall bear the said Rylik, before all
others, &c. In witness of which things we have
set to our common seal at Edinburgh the 11th
day of the month of January, in the year of our
Lord 1454"*
The other arm of St. Giles is preserved in the
Frag. : " Scotomomastica."
September, bearing with them
a statue of St. Giles-"a marmouset
idol," Knox calls itborrowed
from the Grey Friars,
because the great image of the
saint, which was as large as life,
had been stolen from its place,
and after being '' drouned " in
the North Loch as an encourager
of idolatry, was burned
as a heretic by some earnest
Reformers. Only two years
before this event the Dean of
Guild had paid 6s. for painting
the image, and Izd. for
polishing the silver arm containing
the relic. To give dignity
to this last procession the
queen regent attended it in
person; but the moment she
left it the spirit of the mob
broke forth. Some pressed close.
to the image, as if to join in
its support, while endeavouring
to shake it down; but this.
proved impossible, so firmly was
it secured to its supporters; and
the struggle, rivalry, and triumph
of the mob were delightful -to Knox, who described
the event with the inevitable glee in which
he indulged on such occasions.
Only four years after all this the saint's silverwork,
ring and jewels, and all the rich vestments,
wherewith his image and his arm-bone were wont
to be decorated on high festivals, were sold by
the authority of the magistrates, and the proceeds
employed in the repair of the church.
f Under a canopy supported by spiral columns a full-length figure of.
St. Giles with the nimbus, holding the crozier in his right hand, and ih
his left a Look and a branch. A kid, the usual attendant on St. Giles,
is playfully leaping up to his hand. On the pedestal is a shield bearing
the castle triple-towered, S. COMMUNE CAPTI BTI EGIDII DEEDINBURGH.
(Apfindrd to a chartrr by the Provost [ Waite, FodesJ d Chuptrr
of St. Gdes of fke man= andgkk in favmrof the magisfrates and'
conzmndy of Edindrryh, A.D. 1496.") ... the engagement in the charter quoted; and the Prestons continued annually to exercise their right of ...

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THE ROYAL INFIRMARY. 299 h6rmary Street]
students to witness surgical operations. The Infirmary
has separate wards for male and female
patients, and a ward which is used as a Lock
hospital ; but even in ordinary periods the building
had become utterly incompetent for the service
of Edinburgh, and during the prevalence of an epidemic
afforded but a mere fraction of the required
accommodation, and hence the erection of its magnificent
successor, to which we shall refer elsewhere.
The Earl of Hopetoun, in 1742, and for the last
twenty-five years of his life, generously contributed
A400 per annum to the institution when it was
young and struggling. In 1750 Dr. Archibald Kerr
of Jamaica bequeathed to it an estate worth
E218 11s. 5d. yearly; and five years afterwards
the Treasury made it a gift of jG8,ooo j yet it has
never met with the support from Government. that
it ought to have done, and which similar institutions
in London receive.
But the institution owed most of its brilliant
success to Lord Provost Drummond. Among his
associates in this good work he had the honoured
members of the Colleges of Physicians and Surgeons
in Edinburgh, ever first in all works of goodness and
charity; and the first Dr. Munro, Professor of
Anatomy, was singularly sanguine of the complete
success of the undertaking.
That portion of the house which was founded by
the Earl of Cromarty was opened for the reception
of patients in December, 1741. The theatre described
was made to serve the purposes also of a
chapel, and twelve cells on the ground floor, for cases
of delirium fremens, being found unnecessary, were
converted into kitchens and larders, &c. The
grounds around the house, consisting of two acres,
and long bounded on- the south by the city wall,
were laid out into grass walks for the convalescents,
and ultimately the house was amply supplied with
water from the city reservoir.
In the years 1743-4 the sick soldiers of the
regiments quartered in the Castle were accommodated
in the Infirmary; and in the stormy
period of the '45 it was of necessity converted into
a great military hospital for the sick and wounded
troops of both armies engaged at Prestonpans and
elsewhere ; and in I 748 the surgeon-apothecaries,
who since 1729 had given all manner of medical
aid gratis, were feed for the first time. Wounded
from our armies in Flanders have been sent there
for treatment.
In 1748, after paying for the site, building,
furniture, &c., the stock of the institution amounted
to &5,00o; and sick patients not wishing to be resident
were invited to apply for advice on Mondays
and Fridays, and were in cases of necessity
admitted as supernumeraries at the rate of 6d. per
day. About this time there was handed over an
Invalid Grant made by Government to the city,
on consideration of sixty beds being retained for
the use of all soldiers who paid 4d. per diem for
accommodation, This sum, &3, 2 70, was fully made
over to the managers, who, for some time afteqfound
themselves called upon to entertain so many military
patients, that a guard had to be mounted on
the house to enforce order; and liberty was obtained
to deposit all dead patients in Lady Yester's
churchyard, on the opposite side of the street.
Hitherto the physicians had, with exemplary
fidelity, attended the patients in rotation j but in
January, 1751, the managers on being empowered
by the general court of contributors, selected Dr.
David Clerk and Dr, Colin Drummond, physicians
in ordinary, paying them the small honorarium of
;E30 annually.
The University made offer to continue its
services, together with those of the ordinary physicians,
which offer was gladly accepted; and
though the practice fell into disuse, they were long
continued in monthly rotation. To the option of
the two ordinary physicians was left the visiting
of the patients conjointly, or by each taking his
own department. "It was their duty to sign the
tickets of admission and dismission. In case of any
unforeseen occurrences or dangerous distemper, the
matron or clerks were permitted to use this authe
rity ; the physicians en their amval, however, were
expected to append their signatures to the tickets.
The good and economy of the house from the first,
induced the managers to appoint two of their
number to visit the institution once every month,
who were enjoined to inquire how far the patients
were contented with their treatment, and to note
what they found inconsistent with the ordinary
regulations : their remarks to be entered in a book
of reports, to come under review at the first meeting
of managers." (" Journal of Antiq.," VoL 11.)
In 1754 some abuses prevailed in the mode of
dispensing medicines to the out-door patients,
detrimental to the finances ; an order was given for
a more judicious and sparing distribution. In the
following pear application was made to the Town
Council, as well as to the Presbytery of the Church,
to raise money at their several churches to provide
a ward for sick servants-which had been found
one of the most useful in the house. From its
first institution the ministers of the city had, in
monthly rotation, conducted the religious services ;
but in the middle of 1756 the managers appointed
aregular chaplain, whose duty it was to preach
every Monday in the theatre for surgical operations. ... accepted; and though the practice fell into disuse, they were long continued in monthly rotation. To the ...

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