Old and New Edinburgh

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Index for “dreghorn castle”

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Vol. 6  p. 402 (Rel. 2.1)

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Vol. 6  p. 323 (Rel. 2)

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Vol. 6  p. 324 (Rel. 1.91)

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Vol. 3  p. 158 (Rel. 1.1)

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Vol. 6  p. 318 (Rel. 1.05)

ramparts
castle
scotts monument
princes street
mons meg
edinburgh castle
military
barracks ... monument princes street mons meg edinburgh ...

Vol. 1  p. v (Rel. 1.02)

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Vol. 3  p. 95 (Rel. 1.01)

GENERAL INDEX 37s
Douglas, Sir William the Black
Knight ofliddesdal;, II.53,III.
354. 355
Dou&s, Baron, 11. 351
Dough., Lady Jane, Execution of,
Douglas of Grantully, Lady Jane,
1. 208, 158, 384, 11. 9, 1x5, 318,
349-351, 111. 9'
Douglas-Stewart, Lady Jane, Story
1. 83. 84
of 11.344.34
Doiglas, Lady?-z::es, 111. 311
Douglas, Campbell, architect, 111.
155
11. 1g0 ; his dagghter, ib.
Douglas General, 1. 281
Do.glas:WiIliam,minialurepainter,
Douglas, the painter, 11. 89, 90
nouglas. the clan, 11. q, 111. 19
" Dou las " the tragedy of, 11, =+,
21 , , . Douglcu, Dr., p&:$G4~I. zg8
Douglas, Francis Brown, Lord Pro-
Dougk Heron &Co. thebanken,
Douglas'Hotel, St. hndrew Square,
Douglas. Abbot William, 11. 48,
Doune, Lord, 11. zoo, 111. 3 4
Doune Tenace. 11. zoo, 111. 74
Dovecots, Superstitious belief in,
Dover, Duke of, 11. 36
Dow Craig, The, 11. 19 IOI, 1.06
Dowie Johnnie, I. rig, 19 * I +
his therm 1. 3 121
"Dowie Coilege:' Club, 1. xi9
Drama, The early Edinburgh, 11.
23, a+, w; denounced by the
Presbytery, II.24,39 ; theCalton
Hill plays 11. IDrawbridge'lhe
Leith 111. I 8
Dreghorn, iord, '11. 156,166, 911.
Dreghorn Castle. 111. 323, *324
Drem Haronyof 11. 233
Dres; Scottish &like of English
Dress 0; the Scottish gentry I
Dromedary A travelling 11. 15
Drum Ha&, 1. 95, 111.'*345, 34<
Drum Sands. near Cramond. 111
17, 151.
vost 11. 284
II. 19: failur; of 11'. 35
I. mz, 11. 174 342
111. 116
111. 319
32 3
in 1;g 11. 280
centuryago, 111. ~ 3 9
brother, 111. 75
hummond of Hawthornden thi
pat and historian, I. IS+, I1
a?, 54.62, 127, 217, =2,zSg, 111
26 28 ,354.35 ; Ben onson'
vi:it, ii?. 354 ; tte cavalier an<
poet,III. 355; hisloves,ib.; hi
death ib.
Drummbnd, Bishop W i l l i Aber
nethy, 1. a6r, a64
Drummond, Colin, physician, 11
299,301
Drummond, Dr. John, 11.147
Drummond, Gearge, I. 176, 183
Drummond Hay, Coins of, 11. 87
Drummond, am-, artist and anti
UXkUl, It'. b,'III.84, I W , ~
I)rummond Jean I. ga
Drummond of &mock, The, Ill
Drummoud Place. I. 217. 280. I1
Irawings by, I. *at%, *368
354 .. .
'9'7 1927 I 7 289 Drummond $&e Gardens, 11. 19
Drumniond Street, I. 38, 11. 3 y
335. 338, 111. 3, 7
Drummore Lord I. 251 11. 348
DrumquhGel d i r d of,'I. 259, 26
Drumsheunh 'villane. 11. 211. w
111. 7rr y65; vicw'from, 11i.x-6
Drumsheugh, Forest of, I. 237, 11
%h 14:
Drumsheugh House, 11. 115,
Drumsheugh Park, 111. 70, fl
111. 139
h r y , Sir Willim, I. 48, 49, 116,
)ruds gun-battery, I. fl, 330
111. 238 ; trcachcry Of, 111. 133,
134
Duchess of Bragarm," Play of
the, I. 343
hddingston, I. 383, 11. 'go, 303,
307, *309, 3x1, 3139 3141 315, 316,
3x7, 318. 347. 111. 86. 131, 134,
146, 165,314 ; origin of the name,
11. 914 ; barony of 11. 316
hddingston Chnrc'h, 11. * 312:
*313,314; gatewayof,II.*314,
famous ministers of, 11. 315, 317
hddingston House 11. 317
3uddineston Loch,'I. 8, 11, 203,
327, 11. 86, 315. *316, 111. 58,
143 ; skating thereon, 11. 315
h f f , the actor, I. 350
Iuffus, Lady, 11. 333
hgdd Stewart's monument, 11.
den, 111. 3567 357
1.9, * I11
Duke of Albany (see Jam= Duke
Duke of Albany's Own Hwh-
Duke oi Hamilton's apartments,
Duke S t m t 11.117 181
Duke's Walk, The,'I. 8, 3la, 11.
Dumfries, &:f, I. go, 11. 166,
of Albany)
landers 11.
H o l p d &lace, I. 326
3'33, 306, 07
111. 12
Square I1 343
Dumbrect's Hotel, St. Andrew
Dunbar kari of 111. 143
Dunba; Sir Jaies 11.2%
Dunbar: william, burns' lines on,
I. 142, 235, 236, 11. 255
Dunbar Battle of (sec Battles)
Dunbar$ Close I. 6, 5511. 3
Duocan, AdmLl, 11.343, 111. 158,
"23
3797 384,II.I54,174 31% 111.39
Duncan, Dr. .Andrev, physician, 1.
Duncan Lady 11.343
Duncan: the p h e r , 11. 93
Duncan's Land, 111. 78
Dundas. Sir Lawrence, I. 217, XI.
nu,'& Sir ?homas, 11. l a
Dundas: Henry, Viscount Melville
Dundas. Lord Chief B a n . 11.210.
86 196, 171 282
(sec Melville)
343
Dundas, Robcrt Lord Amiston 1.
123,15g,172, 42, 11. 39 II1.;83
Dundas, President, fatie; of Lord
Melville, 1. 242, 346, 11. 210
Dundas, Lord Pradent, I. &,It.
38
Dundas, Lord Advocate, 11.343
Dundas, Sir David, 1. 366, 11. 287.
111. 105. 264: d o t e of h i
. . bf, rri. 7
111. 86,105
Dnnda. oJAske, Bamn, 11. 171
Dundas of Bsefhwood, Sir Kobert,
Dun&, Lady Emily, 11. xg8
nundas Lady Eleonora, 111. 2 9
D u n 4 Col. Walter, 1. 54
Dundas, Lieut.&. Francis, 11.
Dundas, Mr.. 11. m, 283
Dundas riots, 1791. 11. 343
Dundas Street, 11. 199; its Rsi.
dents, 11. ~gg, 111. 162
Dundee, Viscount, I. 62, 63,65,7t
Dundonald, Earl of, 1. 105,331.11.
Dundrennan Lord 11. 175
Dunglas and Greethaw, Baron, I1
279
Dunkeld, Bishops of, I. 39,253. I1
54, 251, 287, 111. 13% 307, 314
Dunfernline, Earl of, I. 3r6.11. z&
Ddermline, Lord, 111. p, 32
Dunfermline, H o w of the A&
210, 342
a579 27"
of, I. 212. 25
Dunlop, Dr. Jam, Fkquest to thq
University, 111. 26
Dunmore Earl of 11. 310
Dunn's dote1 II.'Ba 166, 161
Dupplin, Yi'ount, 1: 50
Durie. Lord, I. i68,242,III.31~,33!
Durie, AbborsofMelrose, I.a53,25.
hrie George, Abbot of Dunfermline'
I. 2x2
>yce,'the painter 11.87
Iysart, Lyonell L r l of,' 2I.ip;
Countess of, 11. 167
Jyvours stane, The, I. 152
E
Fade and Henderson. nurservmen. . I 111. 159
Eagle's Rock, Cramond, Ill. 315
Ear and Eye Dispenw-, I. a86
Earl Gre Street 11. 2x8
Earthen hound, i. gS, 102,106,116,
255, 11. 31. 80, 82. 9% 199. 4 3
bead of the, 11. 93-100; new
from Princes Street, Phtr r7
East and W a t Mayfield Houses,
111. 51
3x6, 349,111. .so
East Cross Causeway, 1. 384. 11.
Eat end of High Street, Nethei
Bow, and west end of Camngate,
T 1 ~ E
Eastbaik. Lord, 11. 10
Fst Gardens, 11.127
East Hermitage Place, Leith, 111
East India Club, 111. 125
E& London Street 11. 185
East Maitland Strc;t, 11. aoq
East Morningside H o w , 111. 47
East Pilton, 111. '309
East Princes Street Gardens. I1
166
100 a14
East b e e n Street Gardens, 11. XI;
East Register Street, 11. 176
East Richmond Street, 11. 337
East Warriston House, 111. IM
Easter, The district, 11. 221
Easter and Wester Pilton, 111. p
Easter Coates. Mansionof, 11. III
Easter Hill, 11. 199
Easterlings, 111.94
Easter Road, 11. 309, III.128,13i
Easter Wemy4 I. 3ag
Eastern and Wekern Duddiingston
133, 15% 158 160
11. 3r4
Echo Bank, 111. 5 4 57; old how
Echbing Rmz, The, 11. 313
Edgar, Rear-Admiral, 111. 142
Edgar's map of Edinbur h, 1. 3"
338, 34% 3% 3731 38551. 17, 81
Edgefield's (Lord), House, I. 241
Edge-tool maker, The first. 11. a6
Edinburgh Academy 111. 81
E$nburgh, Arms of ;he City of, 1
Edinburgh Castle, I. *I, z, 14-79
Stawand Camden'saccannts 15
the lecend of the White fiar,
21; Holyrood Abbey, oa; th
monks of the Castrum Puelb
rum, ib. ; capture of the Castle b
the English, ib.; it becomes
royal.residence,,a3; wars of th
Scottlsh succession, ib . "Wa
lace's Cradle," 24, *z;f the foi
tress dismantled, a+ ;again in th
hands of the En lah, 25' Bu
locks suacagem t r its reAveq
ib.;repairofthefort~,26;pr(
gress of the City, ib. : Henry I\
mvades the City, 27; the Englii
baffled, ib. : Al+y's pr0phe.q
ab.; lamre rding the buMm
of houses. ir; sumptuary law
28 ; murder of James I., 29 ; c1
ronation of James 11.. ib. ; Caul
intrigues, 29,30 ; Lord Chancellc
Crichton, 30; arrogance of t h
Earl of Douglas ib. : the I' blac
dinner " ib . th; Castle besiegec
31 . th; &;'fortified i6. ; +m<
IIi. and his haugdiy no ill@
32 ; plots of the Duke of Alban
and Earl of Mar, ib. ; mysterioi
death of Mar, ib.; apture an
escape of the Duke ofAlbany, 3 .E.; ciptitity of James HI., y
ichard of Gloumter at Edii
burgh,+.; the"C;ol$m Chartei
of the city, ib. ; the Blue RL)
ket," 34, * 36 ; accession of Jam
at 111. 5
2- 246,267. VI, 330,334
16
IV 35 : tournaments, ib. : " thc
se& sisters ot' Borthwick." v.5.'-
36.; the " Ylodden Wall," 38, +o ;
reign of Jam- V 38-42 ; Edmburgh
underthe f&tionsofnobles,
38-40 ; the castle attacked by
the Earl of Hertford, 43,111.16g;
death of Queen Mary of Guise,
I. 44, 45; accession of Mary
Stuart, 45h; birth of Jam- VI
46 *48: t esregeof1~73,47, I I f ?$ ; the a t y bombarded from the
astle, I. 47 ; Elkabeth'sspy, 48;
Sir W. Drury's dispositions for
the &Fe, 48,49 : execuaon of Sir
W: h.rkaldy, 50.: repairof the
ruins, ab. : execution of the Earl
of Morton, ib.; visit of Charles
I p, 51; procession to Holyr&,
Si : coronation of Charles
I., ib. : the struggle against episcopacy,
g1,52; siege of 1644 52 -
the spectre drummer 54; th;
castle baieged by CroLwell ib. ;
ten years' peace in Edinbkh
55 ; the Restoration, ib. ; th;
Argylcs, 56-58 ; the accession of
ames VII., 58 ; sentence of the
rl of Argyle, 58,59 ; h~ clever
59 ; the last sleep of Ar-
?e?.; hisdeath, ib. ; tortureof
the covenanters, 59,150; proclamation
of Williarn and Mary, pII;
the siege ,of 1689 6 internew
between the Duk;p?&rdon and
Viscount Dundee, ib. ; brilliant
defence of the &de, 63,64 ; Qpitulation
of the Duke of Gordm,
65 ; inner gateway of the Castle * 65 ; the spectre of Clawhaw:
66 ; torture of Neville Payne, id. ;
Jacobite plots, ib.: entombing of
thc regalia 66, 67; project for
surprismg ;he fortnss, SI ; right
of sanctuary abolished. ib. ; Lord
Drummonfla plot, 68 : Dome acv.
biteprixmen, 6g; "rebeldies"
70 ; iunes Macgregor, ib. ; de
at escape, 71 : tears as to the
destruction of the crown, sword,
and m p ~ e , ib.; crown-room
opened in 1794 and in 1817 id. ;
Mons Mag, 74 ; general d&p
tion of the Castle, 7 5 7 9
Edinburgh Castle and nty Ancient
and modern vieis of. 1. q. 17.
k
Cast / e vaults, 70 71 ; attempts
-
from various points, 11.193) 216,
111. 117
Edinburgh in 1745 1. 331-334;
Charles Stuart in \he mty, I. 323
Edinburgh Origin of the name, I.
12 ; the infant city, I. 26 ; first
enclosed by walls, 1. 31
Edinburgh and Glasgow Railway,
11. 19 113
Edinburgh and Leith Seamen's
Friendly Society, 111. q
Ediabzdrqh Aa'vmtkr, The, 1.318,
339, 11. 'VV 11% '7% 3a4 35'.
III.63r703 73 752 7% 85, 11% 123,
124l135.139.154,~34.~35.258,306
Edinburgh Assembly Rooms, 1.314,
inburgh Assoclation for Impmving
the Condition of the Poor, 11.
162
Edinburgh Arscdation of Science
and Arts, 11. 143
Edinburgh Bishop of 111.147
Edinburgh' Blind Asyhm, 111. a54
Edinburgh Bamic W e n , Leith
Walk 111. 98. its coratm ib.
Edinb&h &teryCom&y, 11.
"17
Edinburgh Chamber of Commerce
and Manufactures, I. 379, 111.
288
Edinburgh Che5 Club, 11.152
Edinburgh Club, The old, 111.
Ed:s7 * 3 4 3x7 ... plays 11. IDrawbridge'lhe Leith 111. I 8 Dreghorn, iord, '11. 156,166, 911. Dreghorn Castle . 111. 323, ...

Vol. 6  p. 375 (Rel. 0.98)

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Vol. 6  p. 326 (Rel. 0.97)

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Vol. 6  p. 322 (Rel. 0.96)

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Vol. 3  p. 166 (Rel. 0.94)

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Vol. 2  p. 392 (Rel. 0.73)

CRAIGMILLAR CASTLE ... ...

Vol. 5  p. iv (Rel. 0.7)

MERCHISTON CASTLE. ... ...

Vol. 5  p. v (Rel. 0.7)

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Vol. 1  p. 88 (Rel. 0.7)

1745.1 GENERAL- PRESTON, 329
the operations subsequent to his council of war,
though the inscription on his tomb in Westminster
CHARLES EDWARD IN HIS YOUTH,
(Frm t@ Portrait 6y Torque.)
when " besieged by the rebels."
The officers of state had now fled from Edinburgh
to defend which he instantly adopted the most
vigorous measures. He wrote to the Secretary of
State, acquainting him that if not soon relieved he
would be compelled to surrender, as his stock of
provisions was so small. This letter fell into the
hands of the Prince, by whom the Castle was
never formally summoned. Preston had now been
seventy years in the service. He was in his eighty,
seventh year, and was so enfeebled by time and
wounds as to be unable to walk j yet so constant
was his vigilance, that every two hours he was
wheeled round the posts to see that his sentinels
were on the alert, and whenever a Highlander could
be seen, a gun loaded with grape was fired at him
CHAPTER XLI.
EDINBURGH IN 1745 (concluded).
General] Guest's '' Bravery "-Popularity of the Prince-Castle Blockaded-It Fires on the City-kith Bombarded-End of the Blockade-
Departure of the Highland Army for England-Prisoners in the Castle-Macdopald of Teindreich-Duke ofCurnberlan'd in Edinburgh-
Burning of the Standards. ... GENERAL- PRESTON, 329 the operations subsequent to his council of war, though the inscription on his tomb ...

Vol. 2  p. 329 (Rel. 0.69)

EDINBURGH CASTLE FROM GREYFRIARS CHURCHYARD. ... CASTLE FROM GREYFRIARS ...

Vol. 6  p. 189 (Rel. 0.69)

PROSPECT OF EDINBURGH CASTLE FROM THE EAST IN 1779. ... OF EDINBURGH CASTLE FROM THE EAST IN ...

Vol. 1  p. 85 (Rel. 0.68)

I12 OLD AND NEW EDINBURGH. [Bradie's Close.
Cullen, a single-minded and upright man, the
transition is great indeed to the occupant who
gave his name to the next close-a name it still
Masons of Edinburgh, was the son of Convener
Francis Brodie, who had an extensive business as
a cabinet maker in the Lawnmarket; and in 1781
PLAN OF EDINBURGH, FROM THE CASTLE TO ST. GILES'S. (From Gwdm of Rothiemay'.o Maj.)
g, The High Street from the Castle ; 10, The Weighhouse : 15, Horse Market Street : 16, Straight (or West) Bow ; Currer's Close;
35, Liberton's Wynd ; 36, Foster's Wynd ; Z, The Kirk in the Castle Hill.
retains-a notorious character, who had a kind of
dual existence, for he stood high .in repute as a
pious, wealthy, and substantial citizen, until the
daring robbery of the Excise Office in 1788 brought
to light a longcontinued system of secret housebreaking
and of suspected murder, unsurpassed in
the annals of cunning and audacity.
the former was elected a Deacon Councillor of the
city. He had unfortunately imbibed a taste for
gambling, and became expert in making that taste
a source of revenue; thus he did not scruple to
have recourse to loaded dice. It became a ruling
passion with him, and he was in the habit of resorting
almost nightly to a low gambling club, kept ... OLD AND NEW EDINBURGH. [Bradie's Close. Cullen, a single-minded and upright man, the transition is great ...

Vol. 1  p. 112 (Rel. 0.67)

GROUND PLAN OF EDINBURGH CASTLE IN THE PRESENT DAY. ... PLAN OF EDINBURGH CASTLE IN THE PRESENT ...

Vol. 1  p. 81 (Rel. 0.67)

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Vol. 1  p. 21 (Rel. 0.66)

throne would ensure their total destruction, yet
he escaped them. Aware that a day of trial was
coming, and terrified by the unknown fate of Mar,
some of his numerous friends contrived to acquaint
him that in the Roads of Leith there lay a small
vessel laden with Gascon wine, by which he might
and also a strong rope, with a waxen roll
enclosing an unsigned letter, urging, "that he
should lose no time in escaping, as the king's
minions had resolved that he should die ere the
' morrow's sun set," but that the boats of the French
vessel would await him at the harbour of Leith.
EDINBURGH CASTLE IN 1647. (From Gmda o/ Rofhiemuys Mu#.)
U, the Castle; 6, the Castle ChapeL
escape if he made an effort. It is supposed that
he was confined in David's Tower, for we are told
it was one that arose from the northern verge of
the rock, where the height of the precipice seemed
to preclude the possibility of escape. He had
but one attendant (styled his chalmerchield) left
to wait upon him, and to this follower he revealed
his intention. From the vessel there came to
him two small runlets said to contain wine, and
they were camed to his apartment unexamined,
The duke found that they contained malvoisie,
U b,.
To lull suspicion, Albany invited the captain of
the guard and three of his principal soldiers to sup
with him, and all these he succeeded in partially
intoxicating. They sat drinking and gaming until
the hour grew late ; and then the royal duke found
that the moment of fate had come !
Snatching the captain's long dagger from his
baldrick, Albany buried it again and again in his
glittering breast ; he despatched the intoxicated
soldiers in the same fashion, and, in token of his
hostility, with the assistance of his chalmer-chield
castle rock
castles
: ... would ensure their total destruction, yet he escaped them. Aware that a day of trial was coming, and ...

Vol. 1  p. 33 (Rel. 0.66)

THE CASTLE, RAMSAY GARDENS, BANK OF SCOTLAND, AND EARTHEN MOUND, FROM PRINCES STREET. ... CASTLE, RAMSAY GARDENS, BANK OF SCOTLAND, AND EARTHEN MOUND, FROM PRINCES ...

Vol. 3  p. iii (Rel. 0.65)

2 48 OLD AND NEW EDINBURGH. LCowgate.
the historian) became senior minister of the Cowgate
chapel.
One of his immediate predecessors, the Rev.
Mr. Fitzsimmons, an Englishman, became seriously
embroiled with the authorities, and was arraigned
Two of these four, Vanvelde and Jaffie, had
escaped from the Castle by sawing through their
window bars with a sword-blade furnished to them
by John Armour, a clerk in the city. The other
two were on parole. The Hon. Henry Erslcine
THE MEAL MARKET, COWGATE.
before the High Court of Justiciary in July, 1790,
on the charge of aiding the escape of Jean Bap
tiste Vanvelde, Jean Jacques Jaffie, Re'ne' Griffon,
and Hypolite Depondt, French prisoners, from the
Castle of Edinburgh, by concealing them in his
house, and taking them in the Newhaven fishing
boat of Neil Drysdale to the Isle of Inchkeith,
where they remained hidden till taken to a cartel
ship, commanded by Captain Robertson, in Leith
Roads.
defended Mr. Fitzsimmons, who was sentenced to
three months' imprisonment in the Tolbooth. In
the following September 600 French prisoners (including
the crew of the Vicforicux) were marched
from the Castle, under a guard of the North York
Militia, to Leith, where they embarked for England
in care of 150 bayonets of the 7rst Highlanders,
After the erection of St. Paul's Church, in York
Place, the Cowgate Chapel was purchased by the ... 48 OLD AND NEW EDINBURGH. LCowgate. the historian) became senior minister of the Cowgate chapel. One of his ...

Vol. 4  p. 248 (Rel. 0.65)

[-wade. THE MELVILLES..
/
LASSWADE CnuKCH, 1773. (Afdw an Etching by Yohn Clerk of E(din.1
CHAPTER XLIII.
THE ENVIRONS OF EDINBURGH-(ccmclz&d).
Melville Castle and the Melvilles-The Viscounts Melvil1::-Sheriffnall-Newton-Monkton-Stonyhill-" The Wicked Colonel Charteris "-
New Hailes-The Stair Obelisk-Lord Hailes-His Death.
MELVILLE CASTLE stands on the left bank of the
North Esk, about five furlongs eastward of Lasswade,
and was built by the first Viscount Melville,
replacing a fortress of almost unknown antiquity,
about the end of the last century. It is a splendid
mansion, with circular towers, exhibiting much
architectural elegance, and surrounded by a finelywooded
park, which excited the admiration of
George IV.
Unauthenticated tradition states that the ancient
castle of Melville was a residence of David Rizzio,
and as such, was, of course, visited occasionally by
Queen Mary; but it had an antiquity much more
remote.
It is alleged that the first Melville ever known
'in Scotland was a Hungarian of that name, who
accompanied Queen 'Margaret to Scotland, where
he obtained from Malcolm 111. a grant of land
in hiidlothian, and where he settled, gave his surname
to his castle, and became progenitor of all
the Melvilles in Scotland. Such is the story told
by Sir Robert Douglas, on the authority of Leslie,
143
Mackenzie, Martin, and Fordun ; but it is much
more probable that the family is of French origin.
Be all that as it may, the family began to be
prominent in Scotland soon after the reign of
Malcolm 111.
Galfrid de Melville of Meldle Castle, in
Lothian, witnessed many charters of Malcolm IV.,
bestowing pious donations on the abbeys of Holyrood,
Newbattle, and Dunfermline, before 1165, in
which year that monarch died.
He also appears (1153-1165) as Vicecomes de
CasieZZo Pzd'Eamm, in the register of St. Marie
of Newbattle. He witnessed two charters of
William the Lion to the abbey of Cambuskenneth,
and made a gift of the parish church of
Melville (which, probably, he built) to the monastery
of Dunfermline, in presence of Hugh, Bishop
of St. Andrews, previously chaplain to King
William, and who died in 1187.
Galfrid of Melville left four sons-Sir Gregory,
his successor, Philip, Walter, and Waren. Of the
last nothing is known, but the other three founded ... THE MELVILLES.. / LASSWADE CnuKCH, 1773. (Afdw an Etching by Yohn Clerk of E(din.1 CHAPTER XLIII. THE ...

Vol. 6  p. 361 (Rel. 0.61)

Granton 1 LATDTNG OF THE ENGLISH ARMY, 309
I. CAROLINE PARK; a, RUINS OF GRANTON CASTLE ; 3, EAST PILTON. ... 1 LATDTNG OF THE ENGLISH ARMY, 309 I. CAROLINE PARK; a, RUINS OF GRANTON CASTLE ; 3, EAST ...

Vol. 6  p. 309 (Rel. 0.6)

60 OLD AND NEW EDINBURGH. [Craigmillar.
CRAIGMILLAR CASTLE.
I, The Hall ; 2, The Keep ; 3. Queen Mary's Tree ; 4, South-west Tower ; 5, The Chapel ... OLD AND NEW EDINBURGH. [Craigmillar. CRAIGMILLAR CASTLE. I, The Hall ; 2, The Keep ; 3. Queen Mary's Tree ; 4, ...

Vol. 5  p. 60 (Rel. 0.6)

Leaving his queen in the then solitary Castle,
Grime (who, according to Buchanan, began his
reign in the year 996) often pursued the pleasures
of the chase among the wilds of Polmood, in the
probably a remnant of Edwin's departed power,
and from this period begins the authentic history
of Edinburgh and its castle, as from that
time it continued to be almost permanently the
Bertha, her aged father, and infant son, and, burying
them in one grave, heaped above it a rough
tumulus, which still marks the spot.
Full of remorse and fear, the queen died before
the return of Grime, who, after defeating the
Danes, and destroying their galleys, hastened to
this invests the solemn event with a peculiar charm.
The grand-niece of Edward the Confessor, she
had fled from her own country on the usurpation of
Harold, but was wrecked on the Forth, at the place
still called Queensferry. She and her retinue
were hospitably entertained by Malcolm III., who
successor, was deserted in battle by his warriors,
taken captive, and, after having his eyes put out,
died in grief and misery in the eighth year of his
reign.
He was succeeded, in 1004, by Maicolm II.,
who had Lothian formally ceded to him by Eadulf-
Cudel, Earl of Northumberland, who had pre-
Viously exercised some right of vassalage over it,
wife, of Malcolm, in the lines spoken hy Macduff,
Macbeth, Act iv., scene 3 :-
" The queen that bore thee,
Oftener upon her knees than on her feet,
Died every day she lived."
In 1091 William Rufus made war on Scotland,
and, taking the castle of Alnwick by surprise,
wantonly put its garrison to the sword. Malcolm.
coat of arms ... his queen in the then solitary Castle, Grime (who, according to Buchanan, began his reign in the year ...

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CONTENTS.
PAGE
INTROEUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . J
CHAPTER I.
P R E H I S T O R I C EDINBURGH.
The Site before the Houses-Traces of Early Inhabitants-The Caledonian Tribes-Agricola's Invasion-Subjection of the Scottish Lowlands
-The Rorrao Way-Edinburgh never occupied permanently-Various Roman Remains : Urns, Coins, Busts ; Swords, Spears, ahd
other Weapons-Ancient Coffins-The Camus, or Cath-st,neOrigin of the name " Edinburgh"-Dinas-Eiddyn-The Battle of Catraeth 9
CHAPTER 11.
THE CASTLE OF EDINBURGH.
Of its Origin and remoter History-The Legends concerning it-Ebranke-St. Monena-Def& of the Sawons by King Bridei-King
Edwin-King Grime-The Story of Grime and Bertha of Badlieu-The Starting paint of authentic Edinburgh History-Sr Margaret
-Het Piety and amiable Disposition-Her Chapel-Her Death-Restoration of her Oratory-Her Burial-Donald Bane-King
David 1.-The Royal Gardens, afterwards the Nonh Loch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I4
CHAPTER 111.
CASTLE OF EDINBURGH (continued).
The Legend of the White Hart-Holyrocd Abbey founded--The Monks of the Castrum Puellarum-David I.% numerous Endowments-His
Death-Fergus. Lord of Galloway, dies there-William the Lion-Castle Garrisoned by the English for Twelve Yean-The Castle a
Royal Residence-The War of the Scottish Succession-The ( h t l e in the hands of Edward 1.-Frank's Escalade-The Lbrtres
Dismantled-Again in the hands of the English-Bullock's Stratagem for its Re-caprurr-David's Tower . . . . . . 21
CHAPTER IV.
CASTLE OF EDINBURGH (confinucd).
Progress of the City-Ambassidor of Charles VI.-Edinburgh burned-Henry IV, baffled-Albmy's Prophecy-Laws lrgvdiog the Building
- of Houses-Sumptuary Laws, 1457-Murder of James I.-Coronationof JarncsI1.-Court Intrigues-Lard Chancellor C r i c h t o n - ~ g ~ c e
of the Earl of Douglas-Faction WaR--l'he Castle Resieged--"The Black Dinner"-Edmburgh Walled-Its Strength -Bale-fires . 26
CHAPTER V.
EDINBURGH CASTLE (continued).
James 111. and his haughty Nobilib-Plots of the Duke of Albany and Earl of Mar-Mysterious Death of Mar-Capture and Escape of the
Duke of Altuny-Captivity of James 111.-Richard of Gloucester at Edinburgh-The "Golden Charter" of the City-"The Blue
Blanket"-Accession of James 1V.-Tournamen%" The Seven Sisters of Bothwick "-The " Fldden Wall"-The Reign of Jarnes V.
-" Cleahse the Causeway !"-Edinburgh under the Factions of Nobles-Hertford Attacks the CastltDeath of Mary of Guise-
Queen Mary's Apartments in the CaStle-BLth of James VI. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
CHAPTER VI.
EDINBURGH CASTLE (continued).
The Siege of r573-The City Bombarded from the Castle-Elizabeth's Spy-D~ry's Dispositions for the Siege-Execution of Kirkddy-
Repar of the Ruins-Execution of Mortan-Visit of Charles 1.-Procession to Holymod-Comnation of Charles 1.-The Struggle
against Epiico-Siege of 1640-The Spectre Drummn-Besieged by Cmmwell-Under the Protector-The Restantion-The
Argyles-The Accession of James VI1.-Sentence of the Earl of Argyle-His. clever Escape-Imprisoned lour yms later-The Last
Sleep of ArgylcHis Death-Tolture of Covenaoters-Proclamation of W d l i and Maq-The Siege of 16@-Intewiew between
Gordon and Dundee-The Cas le invested-Rdiant Defeuce-Capitulation of the Duke of Cordon-The Spectre of Claverhouse . 47 ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . J CHAPTER I. P R E H I S T O R ...

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iv OLD AND NEW EDINBURGH.
CHAPTER VII.
PAGE
EDINBURGH CASTLE (conclzded). .
The Torture of Neville Payne-Jacobite Plots-Entombing the Regalia-Project for Surprising the Foltress-Right of Sanctuary Abolished
-Lord Drummond's Plot-Some Jacobite Prisoners-'' Rebel Ladies"- James Macgregor-The Castle Vaults-Attempts at Escape-
Fears as to the Destruction of the Crown, Sword, and Sceptre-Crown-room opened in 1794-Again in 1817, and the Regalia brought
forth-Mons Megseneml Description of the whole Castle . . . : . . . . . . . . . . . . 66
CHAPTER VIII. .
THE CA~STLE HILL.
Doyglas-Castle Hill Promenade-Question as to the Proprietary of the Esplanade and Castle Hill . . . . . . . .
The Esplanade or Castle Hill-The Castle Banks-The Celtic Crosses-The Secret Passage and Well house Tower-The Church on the Castle
Hill-The Reservoir-The House of Allan Ramsay-Executions for Treason, Sorcery, &.-The Master of Forbes-Lady Jane
79
CHAPTER IX.
THE CASTLE HILL (conczuded).
'Dr. Guthrie's O~pinal Ragged School-Old Homes in the Street of the Castle Hill-Duke of Gordon's House, Blair's Close-Webster's Close
-Dr. Alex. Webster-Eoswell s Court-Hyndford House-Assembly Hdl-Houses of the Marquis of Argyle, Sir Andrew Kennedy, the
Earl of Cassillis, the Laud of cockpen--Lord Semple's House-Lord Semple-Fah of Mary of Guise-Its Fate . . . . 87
CHAPTER X.
T H E LAWNMARKET.
The Lawnmarket-RiSjt-The Weigh-houstMajor Somerville and captain Crawford-AndeMn's Pills-Myhe's Court-James's Gourt-Sir
John Lauder-Sir Islay Campbell-David Hume--" Cprsica" Boswell-Dr. Johnso-Dr. Blki-" Gladstone's Land "-A Fire in 1771 94
CHAPTER XI.
THE LAWNMARKET (continued).
Lady Stair's Close-Gray of Pittendrum-"Aunt Margaret's M rror"-The Marshal Earl and Countess of Stair-Miss Feme-Sir Richard
Steel-Martha Countess of Kincardine-Bums's Room in Barfer's C1o.e-The Eridges' Shop ih Bank Stxet-Bailie MacMorran's
Story-Sir Francis Grant of Cullen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I02
CHAPTER XII.
THE LAWNMARKET' (continued).
The Story of Deacon Brodie-His Career of Guilt-Hanged on his own Gibbet-Mauchine's Close, Robet? Gourlay's Hoiise and the other
Old Houses therein-The Rank of Scotland, 16~5-Assassination of Sir Gorge hckhart-Taken Red Hand-Punishment of Chiesly I12
CHAPTER XIII.
THE LAWNMARKET (concluded).
Gosford's Close- The Town House of the Abbot of Cambu~kcnncth-Tennant's House-Mansion of the Hays-Liberton's Wynd-Johnnie
Dowie's Tavern-Burns a d His Songs-The Place of Execution-Birthplace of "The Man of Feeling"-The Mirror Club-
Forrester's Wynd-The Heather Stacks in the Houses-Peter Williamn-Beith's Wynd-Habits of the Lawnmarket Woollen
Traders-"Lawnmarket Gazettes "-Melbourne Place-The County Hall-The Signet and Advocates' Libraries . . . . . I I8
CHAPTER XIV.
T H E TOLBOOTH.
Memori-1s of the Heart of Midlothian, or Old Tolbooth-Sir Walter Scott's Description-The Early Tolhth-The "Robin Hod"
Disturbances-Noted Prison-Entries from the Records--Lord Burleigh's Attempts at Escape-The Porteous Mob-The Stories
of Katherine Nairne and of Jam- Hay-The Town Guard-The Royal Bedesmen . . . . . . . . . . . . 12; ... OLD AND NEW EDINBURGH. CHAPTER VII. PAGE EDINBURGH CASTLE (conclzded). . The Torture of Neville ...

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great leaders of that movement, and with cold and
hard hostility they gazed upon her wasted but once
beautifiil' features, as she conjured them in moving
terms to be loyal men and true to Mary, the girlqueen
of Scotland and of France, and touchingly
she implored the forgiveness of all. The apartment
in which she expired is one of those in the
royal lodging, within the present half - moon
battery. The rites of burial were denied her
body, and it lay in the Castle lapped in lead-till
carpets; the tables were of massive oak elaborately
carved ; the chairs of gilded leather with cushions
she had " eleven tapestries of gilded leather; right
of the ' Judgment of Paris'; five of the ' Triumph of
Virtue' j eight of green velvet brocaded with great
trees bearing armorial shields and holly branches ;
ten of cloth of gold and brocaded taffeta ; thirty
more of massive cloth of gold, one bearing the
story of the Count de Foix, eight bearing the
ducal arms of Longueville, five having the history
of King Rehoboam; four the hunts of the Unicorn;
as many more of the story of Eneis, and
EDINBURGH CASTLE, FROM THE SOUTH-WEST.
(Fa-simile 4f a Dutch Engraving fmm a Dmwing ay *don of RotUmay.) ... leaders of that movement, and with cold and hard hostility they gazed upon her wasted but once beautifiil' ...

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the permanent and undisputed capital of Scotland.
Sorrow and indignation spread over all the realm
when the fate of James was heard, and no place
seemed to afford such security to the royal person
as the impregnable Castle of Edinburgh j thus
Queen Jane, ignorant of the ramifications of that
.conspiracy by which her princely husband was
,slain (actually in her arms), instantly joined her
.son James II., who since his birth had dwelt
there. It was then in the hands of William Baron
.of Crichton-a powerful, subtle, and ambitious
statesman, who was Master of the Household.
with every solemnity, on the 25th of March, 1437.
The queen-mother was named his guardian, with
an allowance of 4,000 merks yearly, and Archibald
the great Earl of Uouglas and Angus (Duke of
Touraine) was appointed lieutenant-general of the
kingdom. During the two subsequent years the
little king resided entirely in the Castle under the
custody of Crichton, now Lord Chancellor, greatly
to the displeasure of the queen and her party, who
found him thus placed completely beyond their
control or influence.
In short, it was no longer the queen-mother,
RUINS OF THE WELL-HOUSE TOWER. (~m a D7awifirb W ~ Z Z ~ ~ X . paton, R.s.A.)
Within forty days nearly all concerned in the
imurder of the late king were brought to Edinburgh,
where the ignoble were at once consigned
to the hangman; but for the Earl of Athol and
bother titled leaders were devised tortures worthy
.alone of Chinese or Kaffir ingenuity. Crowned
by a red-hot diadem as " King of Traitors," at the
Market Cross, after undergoing three days of un-
.exampled agonies in sight of the people and the
Papal Nuncio, afterwards Pius II., the body of the
earl was dragged nude through the streets ; it was
then beheaded and quartered.
On the assembly of the Lords of Parliament,
-their first care was the coronation of James II.,
-who was conducted in procession from the Castle
$0 the church of Holyrood, where he was crowned,
but the crafty Crichton, who had uncontrolled
custody of the little sovereign, and who thus was
enabled to seize the revenues, and surround him
by a host of parasites, who permitted neither her,
nor the Regent, Sir Alexander Livingstone of
Callender, to have any share in the government
A bitter feud was the consequence, and Scotland
again was rent into two hostile factions, a state of
matters of which the English could not, as usual,
make profit, as they were embroiled among themselves.
The queen remained with the regent at
Stirling, while her son was literally a prisoner at
Edinburgh ; but, womanlike, the mother formed a
plan of her own to outwit the enemy.
Visiting the Castle, she professed a great regard
for the Chancellor, and a desire to be with her son, ... permanent and undisputed capital of Scotland. Sorrow and indignation spread over all the realm when the fate ...

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AFTER the royal marriage and coronation of
Tames 111. with Margaret of Oldenburg-both of
which ceremonies took place with great pomp at
Edinburgh in 1476, he unfortunately contrived to
lisgust his proud nobility by receiving into favour
many persons of inferior rank. Thus, deep and
dangerous intrigues were formed against him, and
by those minions he was soon made aware that his
brothers-Alexander Duke of Albany, and John
Earl of Mar-were forming a conspiracy against
him, and that the former aimed at nothing less than
wresting the sceptre from his hand, and getting
himself, with English aid, crowned as Alexander IV.,
King of Scotland and the Isles-a fact since proved
by authentic documents.
Instead of employing his authority as Warden of
the Marches in the repression of outrage, Albany
THE ROYAL LODGING OR PALACE, FROM THE GRAND PARADE.
I than once; he slew John of Scougal in East
Lothian; and surrounded himself with a band of
desperadoes, who at his behest executed the most
nefarious crimes.
The dark accusations under which he lay roused
at length the suspicions of the king, who ordered
the arrest of both him and Mar. Over the latter's
fate there hangs a strange mystery. One historian
declares that he died of fever in the Canongate,
under the spells of witches who were burned
therefor. Another records that he was bled to
death in Craigmillar Castle; and the singular discovery
there in 1818 of a man's skeleton built erect
into the north wall was thought to warrant the
adoption of the last account.
In 1482 Albany was committed to the Castle
of Edinburgh, a close prisoner in the hands of ... the royal marriage and coronation of Tames 111. with Margaret of Oldenburg-both of which ceremonies took ...

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smaller cross was raised, " In memory of Colonel
Kenneth Douglas Mackenzie, C.B., who served for
forty-two years in the 92nd Highlanders-who saw
much of service in the field, and deserved well of
his country in war and in peace. . . . Died on
duty at Dartmoor, 24th August, 1873."
On the green bank behind the duke's statue is a
Two relics of great autiquity remain on this side
of the Castle bank-a fragment of the secret
passage, and the ruins of the Well-house tower,
which, in 1450, and for long after, guarded the
pathway that led under the rock to the church oi
St. Cuthbert. Within the upper and lower portion
of this tower, a stair, hewn in the living rock, was
EDINBURGH CASTLE, FROM THE KING'S MEWS, 1825. (AfterEw6ank.)
very curious monumental stone, which, however,
can scarcely be deemed a local antiquity-though
of vast age. It was brought from the coast of
Sweden by Sir -4lexander Seton, of Preston, many
years ago. On it is engraved a serpent encircling a
cross, and on the body of the former is an inscription
in runes, signifying-
ARI ENGRAVED THIS STONE I q MEMORY
OF HIALM, HIS FATHER.
.
GOD HELP HIS SOUL!
found a few years ago, buried under a mass of
rubbish, among which was a human skull, shattered
by concussion on a step. Many human bones lay
near it, with various coins, chiefly of Edward I. and
Edward 111. ; others were Scottish and foreign.
Many fragments of exploded bombs were found
among the upper layer of rubbish, and in a
breach of the tower was found imbedded a
48-pound shot. At certain seasons,. woodcock,
snipe, and waterducks are seen hovering near ... cross was raised, " In memory of Colonel Kenneth Douglas Mackenzie, C.B., who served for forty-two ...

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" Edinburgh Castle, tome and tower,
God grant thou sinke for sinne,
An that even for the black dinner
Earle Douglas got therein."
This affair instead of pacifying the country only
led to ruin and civil strife. The Douglas took arms
under James IV., Duke of Touraine and seventh
Earl of Douglas and Angus, and for a long space the
city and neighbourhood were the scene of contest
and ravage by the opposite factions. The Chancellor
remained secure in the Castle, and, to be revenged
on Sir John Forrester, who had laid waste his lands
at Crichton in 1445, he issued forth with his
troopers and garrison, and gave to fire and sword
all the fertile estates of the Douglases and Forresters
westward of the city, including Blackness,
Abercorn, Strathbroc, aid Corstorphine ; and, with
other pillage, carrying off a famous breed of
Flanders mares, he returned to his eyry.
Douglas, who, to consolidate his power had
espoused his cousin the Fair Maid of Galloway,
adding thus her vast estates to his own, and had now,
as hereditary lieutenant-general of the kingdom,
obtained the custody of the young king, came to
Edinburgh with a vast force composed of the
Crown vassals and his own, and laid siege to the
Castle, which the Chancellor defended for nine
months, nor did he surrender even to a summons
sent in the king's name till he had first seciued
satisfactory terms for himself; whfle of his less
fortunate coadjutors, some only redeemed their
lives with their estates, and the others, including
three members of the Livingstone family, were
beheaded within its walls.
The details of this long siege are unknown, but
to render the investment more secure the Parliament,
which had begun its sittings at Perth, was
removed to Edinburgh on the 15th of July, 1446.
After all this, Earl Douglas visited Italy, and in
his absence during the jubilee at Rome in 1450,
Crichton contrived to regain the favour of James
II., who haviyg now the government in his own
hands, naturally beheld with dread the vast power
of the house of Touraine.
How Douglas perished under the king's dagger
in Stirling in 1452 is a matter of general history.
His rival died at a very old age, three years
afterwards, and was interred among his race in
the present noble church of Crichton, which he
founded.
Beneath the Castle ramparts the rising city was
now fast increasing; and in 1450, after the battle
of Sark, in which Douglas Earl of Ormond de.
feated the English with great slaughter, it was
deemed necessary to enclose the city by walls,
scarcely a trace of which now remains, except the
picturesque old ruin known as the Well-house
Tower, at the base of the Castle rock. They ran
along the southern declivity of the ridge on which
the most ancient parts of the town were built, and
after crossing the West Bow -then deemed the
grand entrance to Edinburgh-ran between the
High Street and the hollow, where the Cowgate
(which exhibited then but a few minor edifices) now
stands; they then crossed the main ridge at the
Nether Bow, and terminated at the east end of
the North Loch, which was then formed as a
defence on the north, and in the construction of
which the Royal Gardens were sacrificed. From
this line of defence the entire esplanade of the
Castle was excluded. " Within these ancient
limits," says Wilson, '' the Scottish capital must
have possessed peculiar means of defence-a city
set on a hill and guarded by the rocky fortress,
there watching high the least alarms; it only
wanted such ramparts, manned by its burgher
watch, to enable it to give protection to its princes
and to repel the' inroads of the southern invader.
'The important position which it now held may be
inferred from the investment in the following year
of Pntrick Cockburn of Newbigging (the Provost
of Edinburgh) in the Chancellor's office as governor
of the Castle, as well as his appointment, along
with other commissioners, after the great defeat of
the English at the battle of Sark, to treat for the
renewal of a truce." It seemed then to be always
'' truce " and never peace !
In the Parliament of 1455 we find Acts passed
for watching the fords of the Tweed, and the
erection of bale-fires to give alarm, by day and
night, of inroads from England, to warn Hume,
Haddington, Dunbar, Dalkeith, Eggerhope, and
Edinburgh Castle, thence to Stirling and the north
-arrangements which would bring all Scotland
under arms in two hours, as the same system did
at the time of the False Alarm in 1803. One
bale-he was a signal that the English were in
motion; two that they were advancing; four in a
row signified that they were in great strength. All
men in arms westward of Edinburgh were ta
muster there ; all eastward at Haddington ; and
every Englishman caught in Scotland was lawfully
the prisoner of whoever took him (Acts, 12th Pal.
James 11.). But the engendered hate and jealousy
of England wopld seem to have nearly reached its
culminating point when the 11th Parliament of
James VI., chap. 104, enacted, ungallantly, "that
no Scotsman marrie an Englishwoman without the
king's license under the Great Seal, under pain of
death and escheat of moveables." ... Edinburgh Castle, tome and tower, God grant thou sinke for sinne, An that even for the black dinner Earle ...

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answer for some raid, act of treason, or murder, he
would perhaps appear at the bar in a suit of mail,
with as many armed men as he could muster;
and the influence of clanship rendered it dishonourable
not to shield and countenance a kins
VIEW FROM THE COWGATE OF THE BUILDINGS ON THE SOUTH SIDE OF THE PARLIAMENT CLOSE,
THE HIGHEST BUILDINGS IN EDINBURGH. (From a Print published in 1794.)
The forcible abduction of Sir Alexander Gibson,
Lord Durie, a noted lawyer (who drew up the
decisions of the Court from the 11th July, 1621.
to the 16th July, 164z)-that his voice and vote
might be absent from the decision of a case-is
hackbuttiers, with matches lighted, to enforce the '
authority of the Court; before which the former
came armed, while four thousand of his followers
of Dumbreck, and taken to Northumberland, where
he was kept for eight days in the Castle of Harbottle,
while his friends and family, unable to ac ... for some raid, act of treason, or murder, he would perhaps appear at the bar in a suit of mail, with as ...

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Stuart monarchs-a new era began in its history,
and it took a stahding as the chief burgh in
Scotland, the relations of which with England, for
generations after, partook rather of a vague prolonged
armistice in time of war than a settled
peace, and thus all rational progress was arrested
or paralysed, and was never likely to be otherwise
so long as the kings of England maintained the
insane pretensions of Edward I., deduced from
Brute the fabulous first king of Albion !
In 1383 Robert 11. was holding his court in
the Castle when he received there the ambassador
of Charles VI., on the 20th August, renewing the
ancient league with France. In the following year
a truce ended; the Earls of March and Douglas
began the war with spirit, and cut off a rich convoy
on its way to Roxburgh. This brought the Duke
of Lancaster and the Earl of Buckingham before
Edinburgh. Their army was almost innumerable
(according to Abercrombie, following Walsingham),
but the former spared the city in remembrance of
his hospitable treatment by the people when he was
among them, an exile from the English court-a
kindness for which the Scots cared so little that
they followed up his retreat so sharply, that he laid
the town and its great church in ashes when he returned
in the following year.
In 1390 Robert 111. ascended the throne, and ir.
that year we find the ambassadors of Charles VI.
again witnessing in the Castle the royal seal and signature
attached to the treaty for mutual aid and
defence against England in all time coming. This
brought Henry IV., as we have said, before the
Castle in 1400, with a well-appointed and numerous
army, in August.
From the fortress the young and gallant David
Duke of Rothesay sent a herald with a challenge
to meet him in mortal combat, where and when
he chose, with a hundred men of good blood on
each side, and determine the war in that way.
" But King Henry was in no humour to forego the
advantage he already possessed, at the head of a
more numerous army than Scotland could then
raise ; and so, contenting himself with a verbal
equivocation in reply to this knightly challenge, he
sat down with his numerous host before the Castle
till (with the usual consequences of the Scottish
reception of such'invaders) cold and rain, and -
twenty feet in length, with three or four large saws,
I for the common use, and six or more " cliekes of
castles, resorted to the simple expedient of driving
off all the cattle and sheep, provisions and goods,
even to the thatch of their houses, and leaving
nothing but bare walls for the enemy to wreak their
vengeance on; but they never put up their swords
till, by a terrible retaliating invasion into the more
fertile parts of England, they fully made up for
their losses. And this wretched state of affairs, for
nearly 500 years, lies at the door of the Plantagenet
and Tudor kings.
The aged King Robert 111. and his queen, the
once beautiful Annabella Drummond, resided in the
Castle and in the abbey of Holyrood alternately.
We are told that on one occasion, when the Duke
of Albany, with several of the courtiers, were conversing
one night on the ramparts of the former,
a singular light was seen afar off at the horizon, and
across the s t a q sky there flashea a bright meteor,
carrying behind it a long train of sparks.
'' Mark ye, sirs ! " said Albany, " yonder prodigy
portends either the ruin of a nation or the downfall
of some great prince ;a and an old chronicler omits
not to record that the Duke of Rothesay (who,
had he ascended the throne, would have been
David III.), perished soon after of famine, in the
hands of Ramornie, at Falkland.
Edinburgh was prosperous enough to be able to
contribute 50,000 merks towards the ransom of
James I., the gifted author of " The King's Quhair "
(or Book), who had been lawlessly captured at
sea in his boyhood by the English, and was left
in their hands for nineteen years a captive by his
designing uncle the Regent Albany ; and though
his plans for the pacification of the Highlands kept
him much in Perth, yet, in 1430, he was in
Edinburgh with Queen Jane and the Court, when
he received the surrender of Alexander Earl of
ROSS, who had been in rebellion but was defeated
by the royal troops in Lochaber.
As yet no Scottish noble had built a mansion in
Edinburgh, where a great number of the houses were
actually constructed of wood from the adjacent
forest, thatched with straw, and few were more than
two storeys in height ; but in the third Parliament
of James I., held at Perth in 1425, to avert the
conflagrations to which the Edinbiirghers were so
liable, laws were ordained requiring the magistrates
to have in readiness seven or eight ladders of
his progress or retreat."*
When unable to resist, the people of the entire
town and country, who were not secured in
* Wilson's ''Memorials." .
fired ;' and that no fire was to be conveyed from
one house to another within the town, unless in a
covered vessel or lantern. Another law forbade'
people on visits to live with their friends, but to ... monarchs-a new era began in its history, and it took a stahding as the chief burgh in Scotland, the ...

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with whom she took up her abode. After having
effectually lulled all suspicion, she affected to remember
a vow she had made to visit the White
Kirk of Brechin (according to the '' Chronicles of
Pitscottie "), and bade adieu to the Chancellor overnight,
with many tender recommendations of the
young king to his care. She set forth betimes next
morning with her retinue, and baggage borne on
sumpter horses. In one of the arks or chests
:trapped on one of these she had the young king
concealed, with his own consert. He was thus
conveyed to Leith, and from thence by water to
Stirling, where she placed him in the hands of the
Regent Livingstone, while the haughty Douglas
kept aloof, as one who took no interest in the
petty intrigues around the throne. Livingstone
now unfurled the royal standard, levied troops, and
laid siege to the Castle of Edinburgh ; but the wary
Chanceflor, finding that he had been outwitted,
pretended to compromise matters by delivering
the keys of the gates into the hands of the king,
after which they all supped together in the great
hall of the fortress. Crichton was confirmed in his
ofice of Chancellor, and the other as regent and
guardian of the royal person, a state of affairs not
fated to last long.
Livingstone having quarrelled with the queen,
she carried off the young king again, and restored
him to the custody of the Chancellor in the Castle
of Edinburgh. Under the guidance of the Bishops
of Moray and Aberdeen, then resident in the city,
a conference was held in the church of St. Giles,
' making him and his rival joint guardians, which,
from their mutual dread and hatred of the Earl of
Douglas, led to an amicable arrangement, and the
young king chose the Castle as his future place of
residence.
The great house..of. Dauglas,had naw reached
the zenith of its baronial power and pride. The
earl possessed Annabdale, Galloway, and other extensive
dominions in. the southern counties, where
all men bowed to his authority. He had the
dukedom of Touraine and lordship of Longueville
in France. He was allied to the royal family of
Scotland, and had at his back a powerful force of
devoted vassals, trained to arms, led by brave
knights, who were ripe at all times for revolt and
strife.
'' The Regent and the Chancellor are both alike
to me," said he, scornfully ; " 'tis no matter which
may overcome, and if both perish the country
will be the better ; and it is a pleasant sight for
honest men to.see such fencers yoked together."
But soon after the potent Douglas died at
Restalrig-h June, 144o-and was succeeded by
his son William, then in his sixteenth year ; and
now the subtle and unscrupulous old Chancellor
thought that the time had come to destroy with
safety a family he alike feared and detested. In
the flush of his youth and p...12, fired by the
flattery of his dependents, the young earl, in the
retinue and splendour that surrounded him far
surpassed his sovereign. He never rode abroad
with less than two thousand lances under his
banner, well horsed, and sheathed in mail, and
he actually, according to Buchanan, sent as his
ambassadors to the court of France Sir Malcolm
Fleming and Sir John Lauder of the Bass, to
obtain for him a new patent of the duchy of
Touraine, which had been conferred on his grandfather
by Charles VII. Arrogance so unwonted
and grandeur so great alarmed both Crichton and
Livingstone, who could not see where all this was
to end.
Any resort to violence would lead to civil war.
He was therefore, with many flatteries, lured to
partake of a banquet in the Castle of Edinburgh,
accompanied by his brother the little Lord David
and Sir Malcolm Fleming of Cumbernauld. With
every show of welcome they were placed at the
same table with the king, while the portcullis was
suddenly lowered, the gates carefully shut, and
their numerous and suspicious train excluded.
Towards the close of the entertainment a black
bull's head-an ancient Scottish symbol that some
one was doomed to death-was suddenly placed
upon the board. The brave boys sprang up, and
drew their swords; but a band of Crichton's
vassals, 'in complete armour, rushed in from a
chamber called the Tiring-house, and dragged
forth the three guests, despite the tears and entreaties
of the young king.
I They were immediately beheaded-on the 24th
of November, I 440-according to Godscroft, '' in
the back court of the Castle that lyeth to the west"
(where the barracks now stand); in the great
hall, according to Balfour. They were buried in
the fortress, and when, in 1753, some workmen, in
digging a foundation there, found the plate and.
handles of a coffin all of which were pure gold,
they were supposed tp belong to that in which
the Earl of Douglas was placed. Singular to say,
Crichton was never brought to trial for this terrible
outrage. " Venomous viper ! I' exclaims the old
historian of the Douglases, "that could hide so
deadly poyson under so faire showes ! unworthy
tongue, unelesse to be cut oute for example to all
ages ! A lion or tiger for cruelty of heart-a waspe
or spider for spight ! " He also refers to a rude
ballad on the subject, beginning ... whom she took up her abode. After having effectually lulled all suspicion, she affected to remember a vow ...

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308 OLD AKD NEW EDINBURGH. [Arthur's Scat.
sey, and a deep excitement prevailed, when it was
whispered-none knew how-that they were under
secret orders for the distant East Indies-in other
words, that they had been SOU to the East India
Company by the Government, and that, worse than
the authorities basely having an idea that the poor
clansmen of Kintail "were ignorant, unable to comprehend
the nature of their stipulations, and incapable
of demanding redress for any breach of trust."
But the Seaforth men were neither so ignorant
all, they had been sold by their officers and by the
chief, whom they had looked upon as a father and
leader.
All their native jealousy and distrust of the
Saxon was now kindled and strengthened by their
love of home. General David Stewart, in his
'' Sketches of the Highlanders," boldly asserts that
the regiment was secretly under orders for India,
nor so confiding as the Government supposed, and
they were determined at all hazards not to submit
to the least infraction of the terms on which they
were enlisted as Fencible Infantry-limited service
and within the British Isles ; and when the day for
embarkation came, the zznd September, their longsmothered
wrath could no longer be hidden.
" The regiment paraded on the Castle hill, and ... OLD AKD NEW EDINBURGH. [Arthur's Scat. sey, and a deep excitement prevailed, when it was whispered-none knew ...

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... Vlll OLD' AND NEW EDINBURGH.
CHAPTER XXXIX.
, T H E W E S T B 0 W (conclud-d.) PAGE
A Hand to Hand Combat in the Bow-Murder'in 1h5 in the Bow-The House of Lord Ruthven-The Hidden Sword-Processions in the
Bow-The Jacobite Prisoners-House of Provost Stewart-A Secret Entertainment to Prince Charles-Donaldson the Printer-State of
Printing and Publishing in his Day-The Edimburck Adwcrfiser-Splendid Fortunc of his Descendant-Town House ,of the
Napiers of Wrightshouse-Trial of Barbara Napier for Witchcdt-Clcckmaker's Land-Paul Romieu-The Mahogany Land-
Duncan Campbell, Chirurgeon-Templar Houses
.
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 315
CHAPTER XL.
E D I N B U R G H I N 1745.
Pmvost Stewart-Advance of the Jacobite Clans-Preparations far DefenctCapturc of the City-Lachiel's Surp&-Entance of Prince
Charles-Arrival at Holyrood-JamesVIII. Proclaimed at the Cross-Conduct of the Highland Tmps in the City-Colquhoun Grant-
A Triumphal ProcessiOn--Guest's Council of War-Preston's Fidelity . . . . . . . . . . . . . jZZ
CHAPTER XLI.
EDINBURGH IN 1745 (concluded),
General Guest's "Brave~~"-Popularity of the Prince-Castle Blockaded-It Fires on the City-Leith Bombarded-End of the Blockade
-Departure of the Highland Army for ' England-Prisoners in the Castle-Macdonald of Teindreich-Duke of Cumberland in
Ediiburgh-Burning of the Standards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 329
CHAPTER XLII.
T H E NORTH BRIDGE.
The New Town projected by Jams VIL-The North Bridge and other Structures by the Earl of Mar, 1728-Oppased in 175g-Foundation
Stone Laid-Erection Delayed till 1$5-Henderson's Plan-William Mylne appointed Architect-Terms of the Contract-Fall of the
Bridge-Repired and Completed--The Upper and Lower Flesh-Markets-Old Post OffictAdam Black-Ann Street-The Ettrick
Shepherd and the .. Nocks"-The Bridge Widened . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 334
CHAPTER XLIII.
EAST SIDE OF THE NORTH BRIDGE.
Dingwall's Castle-Whitefield's " Preachings "-History of the Old Theatre Royal-The Building-David Ross's Management-Leased to
Mr. Foote-Then to Mr. Digges-Mr. Moss-Mrs. Yates-Next Leased to Mr. Jackson-The Siddons Ram-Reception of the Great
Actress-Mrs. Baddeley-New Patent-the playhouse Riot--"The Scottish Roscius"-A Ghost-Expiry of the Patent . . . 340
CHAPTER XLIV..
EAST SIDE OF THE NORTH BRIDGE (continued).
Old Theatre Royal-Management of Mr. Henry Siddons-Mr. Mumy-Miss O'Neill-Production of Rd Roy-Visit of George IV. to the
Theatre- Eoinburgh Theatrical Fund-Scott and his Novels-Retirement of Mr. Mumy-The Management of Mr. and ME.
Wyndham-The Closing Night of the Theatre . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 348
CHAPTER XLV.
EAST SIDE OF THE NORTH BRIDGE (codinwed).
Memorabilia of the General Post Office-First Postal Svstem in Scotland-First Communication with Irdand-Sanctions given by the Scottish
Parliament-Expenses of the Establkhment at various Periods-The Horse Posts-Violation of Letter Bags-Casualties of the Period-
The First Stage Coach-Peter Willison-The Various Post Ofice Buildings--The Waterloo Place Office-Royal Arms Removed-
New 06ce Built-Staffand F d Details . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .353
CHAPTER XLVI.
EAST SIDE OF THE NORTH BRIDGE (concluded).
The Old Orphan Hospital-It5 Foundation, Object, and Removal-Lady Glenorchy's Chapel-Her Disputes with the Presbytery-Dr. Snell
JonesDemolition of the Chapel and School-Old PhysiC Gardens Formed-The Gardens-& Andrew Balfour-James Suthe.-land-
. Inundatedin ~~Sutherland5EffortstoImprovetheGardens-ProfessorHope . . . . . . . . . . . 359 ... Vlll OLD' AND NEW EDINBURGH. CHAPTER XXXIX. , T H E W E S T B 0 W (conclud-d.) PAGE A Hand to Hand Combat in ...

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woman's cap, it was perhaps the most lawless land
in Europe.
All save those who possessed. zoo merks of
yearly rent were forbidden to wear silk or furs, or
borderings of pearl or bullion; and the feminine
rove of display attracted the attention of Parliarnent
at Edinburgh in 1457. It was ordained that
citizens should make their wives and daughters
appear in costumes suitable to their estate and
position ; on their heads short curches with little
and their wives the same ; the curches of the latter
to be of their own making, and not to exceed the
price " of XI pennyes the elne."
By the same laws, advocates who spoke for money
in Parliament were ordained " to have habits of
grene, of the fassoun of a tuneike, and the sleeves
to be oppin as a tabert."
From the date of the cruel assassination of
James I.-the poet, soldier, and lawgiver-may be
considered the time when Edinburgh became really
[The Castle.
resort to " hostillaries," for the encouragement of
the latter.
During the reign of James I. and his successor
laws were passed against excess in dress j and it
has been said that, though edicts were passed for
everything in Scotland, even to the shape of a
hoods ; (' and as to their gownes, that na woman
weare mertrickes nor letteis, nor tailes unfit in
length, nor furred under, but on the Halie-daie f
and that no labourers nor husbandmen were to
wear anything on work-days but grey and white ;
and even on holidays but light blue, green, red, ... cap, it was perhaps the most lawless land in Europe. All save those who possessed. zoo merks of yearly ...

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them were captured, among others old McLean,
who made a desperate resistance in the West Port
with a musket and bayonet. Many who rolled
down the rocks to the roadway beneath were
severely injured, and taken by the City Guard. A
sentinel was bound hand and foot and thrown into
Macintosh, of Borlum, in his 80th
captivity of fifteen years, for participation
rising of 1715; and for twelve months,
there were confined in a small, horrid, unhealthy
chamber above the portcullis,
many a year as '' the black hole " of
south) where he confessed the whole plot ; the
corporal was mercilessly flogged ; and Sergeant
Ahslie was hanged over the postern gate. Colonel
Stuart was dismissed ; and Brigadier Grant, whose
regiment was added to the garrison, was appointed
temporary governor.
From this period, with the exception of a species
of blockade in 1745, to be related in its place,
the history of the Castle is as uneventful as that of
the Tower of London, save a visit paid to it in t+
time of George I., by Yussuf Juniati, General and
Governor of Damascus.
Many unfortunate Jacobites have suffered most
protracted periods of imprisonment within its walls.
' with her daughters, the Ladies Mary
who were brought in by an escort of twenty
under a ruffianly quartermaster, who
with every indignity, even to tearing weddingring
from Lady Strathallan's finger, and
daughters of their clothes. During the
these noble ladies were in that noisome
the gate, they were without female attendance,
under the almost hourly surveillance sergeants
of the guard. The husband of
was slain at the head of his men on
Culloden, where the Jacobite clans were
by neither skill nor valour, but the sheer
numbers and starvation. ... were captured, among others old McLean, who made a desperate resistance in the West Port with a musket and ...

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vi OLD APU'D NEW EDINBURGH.
CHAPTER XXII.
ST. ANDREW SQUARE.
PAGE
St. Andrew Sq-Lst .of Early R e s i d e n u t Bomwlaski-Miss Gordon of CLuny-SconiSh W d m ' Fund-Dr. A. K. Johnstoo
--Scottish Provident Institution-House in which Lord Bmugham was Bom-Scottish Equitable Society-Charteris of Amisfield-
Douglas's Hotel-Sk Philip Ainslie-British Linen Company-National Bank--Royal Baulc-The Melville and Hopetoun Monuments
-Ambm's Tavern. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I66
CHAPTER XXIII.
CHARLOTTE S Q U A R E ,
Charlotle Sq-Its Early OccuPantgSu John Sinclair, B a r t - b o n d of that Ilk-Si Wdliam Fettes-Lard chief Commissioner Adam
-Alexander Dimto-St. George'r Church-The Rev. Andrew Thomson-Prince ConSmt's Memorial-The Parallelogram of the first
New Town. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . -172
CHAPTER XXIV.
ELDER STREET-LEITH STREET-BROUGHTON STREET.
Elder Street--Leith Street-The old "Black BuU"-Margarot-The Theatre Royal-Its Predecessors on the same Site-The Circus-
C o d s Rooms-The Pantheon-Caledonian Thoaue--Adelphi Theatre-Queen's Theatre and Open House-Burned and Rebuilt-
~ t . wary's chapel-~ishop Cameron . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .176
CHAPTER XXV.
THE VILLAGE AND BARONY OF BROUGHTON.
Bmghton-The Village and Barmy-The Loan-Bmughton first mentioned-Feudal Superio+Wttches Burned-Leslie's Headquarters
-Gordon of Ellon's Children Murdered-Taken Red Hand-The Tolbooth of the Burgh-The Minute Books-Free Burgews-
Modern Ch& Meted in the Bounds of the Barony . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .r80
CHAPTER XXVI.
THE NORTHERN NEW TOWN.
Picardy PI-Lords Eldm and CDig-Su David Milm--Joho AbcrcmmbitLord Newton--cOmmissioner Osborne-St. PauPs Church
-St. George's Chapel-Wib Douglas, Artist-Professor Playfair-Gcned Scott of BellencDrummond Place-C K. Sharpe of
Hoddam-Lard Robertson-Abercmmbie Place and Heriot Row-Miss Femer-House in which H. McKenzie died-Rev. A. Aliin
-Great King Street-Sir R Chrii-Sir WillLm Hamilton-Si William Allan--Lord Colonsay, Lc. . . . . . . . 185
CHAPTER XXVII.
THE NORTHERN NEW TOWN (codu&d).
AdrnLal Fairfax-Bishop Terrot-Brigadier Hope-Sir T. M. Brisbam-Lord Meadowbank-Ewbank the R.S.A-Death of Professor
Wilson-Moray Place and its Distria-Lord President Hope-The Last Abode of Jeffrey-Bamn Hume and Lord Moncrieff-
Fom Street-Thomas Chalmers, D.D.-St. Colme Street-Cap& Basil Hall--Ainslie Place-Dugald Stewart-Dean Ramsay-
Great Stuart Slreet--Pmfessor Aytwn--Mk Graharn of DuntrooPLord Jerviswoodc . . . . . . . . . . I98
CHAPTER XXVIII.
THE WESTERN NEW TOWN-HAYMARKET-DALRY-FOUNTAINBRIDGE.
Maithd Street and Shandwick Place-The Albert Institute--Last Residence of Sir Wa'ta Smtt in Edinburgh-Lieutenant-General
DundatMelville Street-PatricL F. Tytler--Manor Piace-St. M q ' s Cathedral-The Foundation Ud-Its Si and Aspxt-
Opened for Srrsice--The Copstone and Cross placed on the Spire-Haymarket Station-Wmta Garden-Donaldson's Hospital-
Castle Te-Its Churches-Castle Barns-The U. P. Theological Hall-Union Canal-Fkt Boat Launched-Dalry-The Chieslies
-The Caledoniau Dstillery-Foun&bridg=-Earl Grey Street-Professor G:J. Bell-The Slaughter-ho-Baii Whyt of Bainfield
-Nd British India Rubber Works-Scottish Vulcanite CompanpAdam Ritchie . . . . . . . . . . . . Z q ... OLD APU'D NEW EDINBURGH. CHAPTER XXII. ST. ANDREW SQUARE. PAGE St. Andrew Sq-Lst .of Early R e s i d e n u t ...

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the ancient ruby ring which the kings of Scotland
wore at their coronation. It was last used by the
unhappy Charles I., and, after all its wanderings
with his descendants, is now in its old receptacle,
together with the crown, sceptre, sword of state,
and the golden mace of Lord High Treasurer.
The mace, like the sceptre, is surmounted by a
great crystal beryl, stones doubtless of vast antiquity.
The " great beryl " was an amulet which
[Edinburgh Castle.
with the like number of diamonds and sapphires
alternately, and the points tipped with great pearls;
the upper circle is elevated with ten crosses floree,
each adorned in the centre with a great diamond
betwixt four great pearls placed in the cross, one
and one, and these crosses floree are interchanged
with ten high flews de fix, all alternately with the
great pearls below, which top the points of the
second small circle. From the upper circle proceed
cage, the regalia now lie on a white marble table
in the crown-room, together with four other memorials
of the House of Stuart, which belonged
to the venerable Cardinal York, and were deposited
there by order of King William in 1830. These
are the golden collar of the Garter presented to
James VI. by Elizabeth, with its appendage the
George; the order of St. Andrew, cut on an onyx
and having on the reverse the badge of the Thistle,
which opens with a secret spring, revealing a beau-
The ancient crown worn by Robert I. and his
successors underwent no change till it was closed
with four arches by order of James V., and it is
thus described in the document deposited with the
Regalia in the crown-room, in 1707 :-
"The crown is of pure gold, enriched with
many precious stones, diamonds, pearls, and curious
enamellings. It is composed of a fillet which
goes round the head, adorned with twenty-two
large precious stones. Above the great circle there
THE REGALIA OF SCOTLAND. ... ancient ruby ring which the kings of Scotland wore at their coronation. It was last used by the unhappy ...

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of the most brilliant conversationalists and the
kindest-hearted of men in Edinburgh.
Among the prizes competed for are the gold
THE HIGH SCHOOL.
medal was first awarded." The appendix to
Stevens's history of the famous school contains a
most interesting list of 180 boys, medallists or
city for Greek in the Rector's class ; the Ritchie
gold medal, presented in 1824, by Mr. William
Ritchie, for twenty-three years a master of the
school; the Macdonald, a third class medal,
given by Colonel John Macdonald, of the regiment
of Clan Alpine, son of the celebrated Flora
Macdonald, and presented for the first time in
1824.
The College Bailie silver medal for writing, the
personal gift of the gentleman holding that office
for the year, was first presented in 1814, and for
the last time in 1834.
"The head boy or dux of the school, at the yearly
examination, till about the close of the eighteenth
century," says Dr. Steven, '( usuallyreceived from the
city, as a prize, a copy of the best edition of one of
the classics. This was prior to I 794, when a gold
63
a gold medal given by Lieut.-Colonel Peter
Murray, Adjutant-General in Bengal in 1794, and
the name of which was changed to the Macgregor.
institution in the kingdom has ever sent forth SO
many pupils who have added fresh laurels to the
glory of their country.
In it is still preserved as a relic the carved
stone which was over the principal entrance of the
first school from'1578 to 1777. It bears within a
panel the triple castle of the city, with the initials
I. S., and, under the thistle, the date and legend :-
MVSIS : RESPUBLICA
FLORET. 1578.
Above t6is in a pediment is an imperial cronm,
with two thistles and the initials I. R. 6.
The High School Club, composed of old
scholars, was first instituted in 1849.
At a great entertainment given in the city to Mr.
(afterwards Lord) Brougham, on the 25th of April,
1825, presided over by Henry (afterwards Lord)
Of the distinguished men in every department of
life who conned their studies in the class-rooms, even
of the new High School, it is impossible to attempt ... the most brilliant conversationalists and the kindest-hearted of men in Edinburgh. Among the prizes competed ...

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17451 MACDONALD OF TEINDREICH. 333
landers, after their retreat from England, were besieging
Stirling, Lord Tweeddale wrote to General Guest,
stating that they meant to take the capital again.
On this, the Edinburghers at once held a solemn
council of war, and valiantly resolved to defend the
city; and once more all their plate and valuables
were committed to the care of General Guest. It was
take, Hawley, who had served as a major at
Sheriffniuir, and always expressed contempt 'for
the Highlanders, marched with fourteen battalions,
besides cavalry and artillery, to Falkirk, where his
army was routed as completely as that of Cope
had been, and all his guns were taken, save one
brought off by the 4th Regiment.
CHARLES EDWARD IN HIS LATER YEARS.
(From a Partrait Sy Oeim Humjhy, R.A., iake?a at Fhrme, 1776.)
arranged that a store of provisions should be
immediately laid in, that the cannon should be
mounted on travelling carriages, that the walls and
gates should be more completely fortified, that a
corps of really resolute soldiers should be embodied;
and again arms were issued to the
Seceders, and all who required them ; but on hearing
that Charles had actually made a requisition
for horses to draw his battering train, their courage
evaporated a second time, and all ideas of fighting
were abandoned; but the arrival of General
Hawley's army relieved them from immediate
apprehension.
Erecting an enormous gallows in the Grassmarket,
whereon to hang all prisoners he might
In the Castle he lodged his sole trophy, the
brave Major Donald Macdonald of Teindreich,
who struck the first blow in the revolt at the
Spean Bridge, and who had been captured in the
smoke at Falkirk. He was brought in bound with
ropes,'and kept in a dungeon till he was sent in
chains to Carlisle, to be butchered with many
others. He was a handsome man, and bore his
sufferings with great cheerfulness.
" It was principle, and a thorough conviction of
its being my duty to God, my injured king and
oppressed country," said he, "which induced me
to take up arms under the standard of his Royal
Highness Charles Prince of Wales, and I solemnly
declare I had no bye views in drawing my sword in
' ... MACDONALD OF TEINDREICH. 333 landers, after their retreat from England, were besieging Stirling, Lord ...

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IMIPERATC~OERSAI RIT. ITO. CELIO. HADKIANO
ANTONINOA.U G. Pro. PATRIP. ATRIB.
Although the Roman military causeway-o
which some fragments still remain--from Brittano
dunum to Alterva (i.e. from Dunbar ta Cramond
passed close to it, the Castle rock never appear!
to have become a Roman station; and it is suf
ficiently curious that the military engineers of thc
invaders should have neglected such a strong an(
natural fortification as that steep and insulatec
mass, situated as it was in Valentia, one of thei
six provinces in Britain.
Many relics of the Romans have been turnec
up from time to time upon the site of Edinburgh
but not the slightest trace has been found to indicatc
that it was ever occupied by them as a dwelling
place or city. Yet, Ptolemy, in his ? Geography,?
speaks of the place as the Casfrum alaturtz, ??2
winged camp, or a height, flanked on each sid<
by successive heights, girded with interinediatt
valleys.?? Hence, the site may have been a nativt
fort or hill camp of the Ottadeni.
When cutting a new road over the Calton Hill,
in 1817, a Roman urn was found entire; anothei
(supposed to be Roman), eleven and a half inches
in height, was found when digging the foundation
of the north pier ol
the Dean Bridge,
that spans a deep
ravine, through
which the Water ol
Leith finds its way
to the neighbouring
port. In 1782 a
coin of the EmperoI
Vespasian was found
in a garden of the
Pleasance, and is
now in the Museum
of Antiquities ; and
when excavating in ROMAN URN FOUND AT THE DEAN.
(Frwtn th Anfiqnanan Museum.) St. Ninian?s Row, on
the western side of
the Calton, in 1815, there was found a quan?tity of
fine red Samian ware, of the usual embossed character.
In 1822, when enlarging the drain by which
the old bed of the North Loch was? kept dry,
almost at the base of the Castle rock, portions of
ar. ancient Roman causeway were discovered, four
feet below the modem road. Another portion of
a Roman way, composed of irregular rounded
stones, closely rammed together on a bed of
forced soil, coloured with fragments pf brick, was
discovered beneath the foundations of the Trinity
College Church, when it was demolished in 1845.
The portions of it discovered in 1822 included a
branch extending a considerable way eastward
along the north back of the Canongate, towards the
well-known Roman road at Portobello, popularly
known as ? The Fishwives? Causeway.? ? Here,?
says Dr. Wilson, ?we recover the traces of the
Roman way in its course from Eildon to Cramond
and Kinneil, with a diverging road to the importanttown
and harbour at Inveresk, showing beyond
doubt that Edinburgh had formed a Zink between
these several Roman sites.??
Within a few yards of the point where this road
crossed the brow of the city ridge were built into
the wall of a house, nearly opposite to that of
John Knox, two beautifully sculptured heads of
the Emperor Septimius Severus and his wife Julia.
These busts, which Maitland, in his time (I~so),
says were brought from an adjacent building, Wilson
the antiquary conjectures were more probably
found when excavating a foundation; but under
the causeway of High Street, in 1850, two silver
denarii of the same emperor were found in excellent
preservation.
These busts were doubtless some relic of the
visit paid to the colony by Septimius Severus, for
Alexander Gordon, in his ? Itinerarium Septentrionale,?
published in 1726, says :-? About this
time it would appear that Julia, the wife of Severus,
and the greatest part of the imperial family, were
in the country of Caledonia; for Xephilin, from
Dio, mentions a very remarkable occurrence which
there happened to the Empress Julia and the wife
3f Argentocoxus, a Caledonian.??
Passing, however, from the Roman period, many
listant traces have been found of people who
lwelt on, or near, the site of Edinburgh, in what
may be called, if the term be allowable, the preiistoric
period.
In constructing the new road to Leith, leading
iom the centre of Bellevue Crescent, in 1823,
several stone cists, of circumscribed form, wherein
:he bodies had been bent double, were found;
ind these being disposed nearly due east and west,
were assumed, but without evidence, to have been
.he remains of Christians. In 1822 another was
ound in the Royal Circus, buied north and south ;
he skeleton crumbled into dust on being exposed,
ill save the teeth.
During the following year, 1823, several mde
tone coffins were discovered when digging the
oundations of a house in Saxe Coburg Place, near
;t. Bernard?s Chapel. One of them contained two
irns of baked clay, from which circumstance it was
#upposed that this was a place of interment, at the
ieriod when the Romans had penetrated thus far ... RIT. ITO. CELIO. HADKIANO ANTONINOA.U G. Pro. PATRIP. ATRIB. Although the Roman military ...

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well worth consideration ; but, interesting as it is, it
need not detain us long here.
In the ? Myrvyian, or Cambrian Archa?ology,? a
work replete with ancient lore, mention is made of
Caer-Eiddyn, or the fort of Edin, wherein dwelt
a famous chief, Mynydoc, leader of the Celtic
Britons in the fatal battle with the Saxons under
Ida, the flame-bearer, at Catraeth, in Lothian, where
the flower of the Ottadeni fell, in 510; and this is
believed to be the burgh subsequently said to be
named after Edwin.
In the list of those who went to the battle of
Catraeth there is record of 300 warriors arrayed in
fine armour, three loricated bands (Le., plated for
defence), with their commanders, wearing torques
of gold, ?three adventurous knights,? with 300 of
equal quality, rushing forth from the summits of
the mighty Caer-Eiddyn, to join their brother
chiefs of the Ottadeni and Gadeni.
In the ?British Triads? both Caer-Eiddyn
(which some have supposed to be Carriden), and
also DinasEiddyn, the city of Eiddyn, are repeatedly
named. But whether this be the city of
Edinburgh it is exceedingly difficult to say; for,
after all, the alleged Saxon denominative from
Edwin is merely conjectural, and unauthenticated
by remote hcts.
From Sharon Turner?s ?Vindication of Ancient
British Poem%,? we learn that Aneurin, whose work
contains 920 lines, was taken prisoner at the battle
of Catraeth,* and was afterwards treacherously slain
by one named Eiddyn; another account says! he
died an exile among the Silures in 570, and that the
battle was lost because the Ottadeni ?had drunk
of their mead too profusely.?
The memory of Nynydac Eiddyn is preserved
a beautiful Welsh poem entitled The Drinking
Iorn,?by Owain, Prince of Powis.
i full of energy.
The poem
?? When the mighty bards of yore
Awoke the tales of ancient lore,
What tide resplendent to behold,
Flashed the bright mead in vase of Gold !
The royal minstrel proudly sung
Of Cambria?s chiefs when time was young;
How, with the drink of heroes flushed,
Brave Catraeth?s lord to battle rushed,
The lion leader of the strong,
And marshal of Galwyiada?s throng ;
The sun that rose o?er Itun?s bay
Ne?er closed on such disastrous day ;
There fell Mynydoc, mighty lord,
Beneath stem Osway?s baneful sword ;
Yet shall thy praise, thy deathless pame,
Be woke on harps of bardic fame,
Sung by the Cymri?s tuneful tmb,
Aneurin of celestial strain.?
DanielWilson,one of the ablest writers on Scottish
ntiquities, says that he thinks it useless ?to follow
le fanciful disquisitions of zealous anticuarians
Zspecting the origin and etymology of Edinburgh ;
: has successively been derived, both in origin and
1 name, from Saxon, Pict, and Gael, and in each
ase With sufficient ingenuity to leave the subject
lore involved than at first? But while on this
ubject, it should be borne in mind that the unirtunate
destruction of the national records by the
waders, Edward I. and Oliver Cromwell, leaves
ie Scottish historian dependent for much of his
iaterial on tradition, oi information that can only
e obtained with infinite labour; though it may
o doubt be taken for granted that even if these
rchives had been preserved in their entirety they
ould scarcely have thrown much, if any, light upon
le que& vexata of the origin of the name of
;dinburgh.
CHAPTER 11.
THE CASTLE OF EDINBURGH.
Of its Origin and remoter History-The Legends concaning it-Ebranke-St. Monena-Defeat of the Saxons by King Bridei--King Ed&-
Ring Grime-The Story of Grime and Benha of Badlieu-The Starting-point of authentic Edinburgh History-SL Mugarct-Her Piety
and vlliaMe Disoosition-Her Chaoel--Ha Dath-Rcstontion of her Oiatary-Her BurLCDonnld Bauc-Khg a v i d L-l?hc Royal
Gardens, afterwp;ds the North Lock
AFTER the departure of the Romans the jnhabitants
of fiorthern Britain bore the designation of Picti,
or Picts; and historians are now agreed that these
were not a new race, but only the ancient Caledonians
under a new name.
The most remote date assigned for the origin
*The famous Cutrail, or Pictsmrk-ditch, is a u wto have had
somc amnection with this battle df cluaeth. (Gdb Cambrrasir. 11.)
of the Castle of Edinburgh is that astounding
announcement made in Stods ?Summarie of
Englyshe Chronicles,? in which he tells us that
?Ebranke, the sonne of Mempricius, was made
ruler of Britayne ; he had, as testifieth Policronica,
Ganfride, and others, twenty-one wyves, of whom
he receyved twenty sonnes and thirty daughters,
which he sent into Italye, there to be maryed to ... worth consideration ; but, interesting as it is, it need not detain us long here. In the ? Myrvyian, or ...

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36 OLD AND NEW EDINBURGH. [Merchistom
captain named ScougaL
After a hard struggle, during which several were
killed and wounded, they stormed the outworks,
and set them on fire to smoke the defenders out of
the donjon keep ; but a body of the king's men
veyed to Leith, and hanged, while he had a narrow
escape, his horse being killed under him by a shot
from Holyrood Palace, Another conflict of a
more serious nature occurred before Merchiston
on the last day of the same month.
attack by firing forty guns from the Castle of Edinburgh.
The men of Scougal (who were mortally wounded)
fled over the Links and adjacent fields in all
directions, hotly pursued by the Laird of Blairquhan.
On the 10th of the subsequent June the
queen's troops, under George, Earl of Huntly, with
a small train of artillery, made another attack upon
Merchiston, while their cavalry scoured all the
fields between it and Blackford-fields now covered
with long lines of stately and beautiful villas-bringing
in forty head of cattle and sheep. By the time
the guns had played on Merchiston from two till
four o'clock p.m., two decided breaches were made
in the walls. The garrison was about to capitulate,
when the assemblage of a number of people, whom
the noise of the cannonade had attracted, was
mistaken for king's troops ; those of Huntly be,came
party of twenty-four men-at-arms rode forth to
forage. The well-stocked fields in the neighbourhood
of the fortalice were the constant scene of
enterprise, and on this occasion the foragers
collected many oxen, besides other spoil, which
they were driving triumphantly into town. They
were pursued, however, by Patrick Home of the
Heugh, who commanded the Regent's Light
Horsemen. The foraging party, whom hunger
had rendered desperate, contrived to keep their
pursuers, amounting to eighty spears, at bay till
they neared Merchiston, when the king's garrison
issued forth, and re-captured the cattle, the collectors
of which '' alighted from their horses, which they
suffered to go loose, and faught CreauZZ'iee," till succoured
from the town, when the fight turned in
their favour. In this conflict, Home of the Heugh,
Sir Patrick Home of Polwarth, four more gentle ... OLD AND NEW EDINBURGH. [Merchistom captain named ScougaL After a hard struggle, during which several ...

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Beechwood.] SIR ROBERT DUNDAS OF BEECHWOOD. 105
to the Castle of Edinburgh under a strong escort of
their comrades.
General Leslie, and Lieutenant MacLean the
adjutant, having accompanied this party a little
way out of Glasgow, were, on their return, assailed
by a mob which sympathised with the Highlanders
and accused them of being active in sending
away the prisoners. The tumult increased,
stones were thrown ; General Leslie was knocked
down, and he and MacLean had to seek shelter
these documents were not formally executed, were
confused in their terms, and good for nothing in a
legal sense, Mrs. Rutherford of Edgerstoun very
generously fulfilled to the utmost what she conceived
to be the intentions of her father.
Sir Robert Dundas, Bart., of Beechwood, like the
preceding, figures in the pages of Kay. He was
one of the principal Clerks of Session, and Deputy
Lord Privy Seal of Scotland. He was born in
June, 1761, and was descended from the Dundases
BEECHWOOD.
in the house of the Lord Provost till peace
officers came, and a company of Fencibles. One
of the mutineers was shot, by sentence of a
court-martial. The others were sent to America.
On his way back to Edinburgh General Leslie
was seized with a dangerous illness, and died at
' Beechwood House on the 27th of December,
'794.
No will could be found among the General's repositories
at Beechwood, and it was presumed that
he had died intestate. However, a few days after
the filneral, two holograph papers were discovered,
bequeathing legacies to the amount of L7,ooo
among some of his relations and friends, particularly
.&I,OOO each to two natural daughters. Although
110
of Amiston, the common ancestor of whom was
knighted by Charles I., and appointed to the
bench by Charles 11. Educated as a Writer to
the Signet, he was made deputy-keeper of Sashes,
and in 1820 a principal Clerk of Session. He was
one of the original members of the old Royal
Edinburgh Volunteers, of which corps he was a
lieutenant in 1794. He purchased from Lord
Melville the estate of Dunira in Perthshire, and
succeeded to the baronetcy and the estate of
Beechwood on the death of his uncle General Sir
David Dundas, G.C.B., who was for some time
Commander-in-Chief of the forces. Sir Robert
died in 1835.
A winding rural carriage-way, umbrageous and ... SIR ROBERT DUNDAS OF BEECHWOOD. 105 to the Castle of Edinburgh under a strong escort of their ...

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224 OLD AND NEW EDINBURGH. [Weat Port.
~~ ~
the dreadful Irish murders in 1828; but its repute
was very different in the last century. Thus we find
in the Edinburgh papers for 1764, advertisedas to let
there, " the new-built house, beautifully situated on
the high ground south of the Portsburgh, commanding
an extensive prospect every way, with genteel
furniture, perfectly clean, presently possessed by
John Macdonald, Esq., of Lairgie," with chaisehouse
and stabling.
remained intact up till SO recently as 1881, while
around the large cupola and above the chief seat
were panels of coats of arms of the various city
crafts, and that also of the Portsburgh-all done in
oil, and in perfect condition. This court-room was
situated in the West Port. In its last days it was
rented from the city chamberlain by the deacons'
court of Dr. Chalmers' Territorial Church. Mission
meetings and Sunday-schools were held in it, but
OLD HOUSES IN THE WEST PORT, NEAR THE HAUNTS OF BURKE AND HARE, 1869
(Fsmn a Drawing Sy Mn. J. Stnvari Smith.)
Near the Territorial Church is a door above
which are the arms of the Cordiners of the Portsburgh-
a cordiner's cutting-knife crowned, within a
circle, with the heads of two winged cherubim, and
the words of Psalm 133, versified :-
" Behold how good a thing it is,
And how becoming well,
Together such as brethren are,
In unity to dwell.
I 696. "
One of the most complete of the few rare relics
of the City's old municipal institutions was the
court-room where the bailies of the ancient
Portsburgh discharged their official duties. The
bailies' bench, seats, and other court-room fittings
the site upon &hich it was built was sold by
roup for city improvements.
In the middle of the West Port, immediately
opposite the Chalmers Territorial Free Church
and Schools, and running due north, is a narrow
alley, called the Chapel Wynd. Heye, at the foot
thereof, stood in ancient times a chapel dedicated
to the Virgin Mary, some remains of which were
visible in the time of Maitland about 1750. Near
it is another alley-probably an access to itnamed
the Lady Wynd. Between this chapel and
the Castle Rock there exists, in name chiefly, an
ancient appendage of the royal palace in the
fortress-the king's stables, " although no hoof of
the royal stud has been there for well-nigh three
I ... OLD AND NEW EDINBURGH. [Weat Port. ~~ ~ the dreadful Irish murders in 1828; but its repute was very ...

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The Great Fire.] THE GREAT FIRE. 189
Assemlily Close, then occupied as a workshop by
Kirkwood, a well-known engraver. The engines
came promptly enough ; but, from some unknown
cause, an hour elapsed before they were in working
order, and by that time the terrible element had
raged with such fierceness and rapidity that, by
eleven o'clock the upper portion of this tenement,
including six storeys, forming the eastern 'division
of a uniform pile of buildings, was one mass of
roaring flames, which, as the breeze was from the
to their elevated position, or the roar of the gathering
conflagration, the shouts of the crowd, and
wailing of women and children, their cries were
unheard for a time, until it was too late. The
whole tenement was lost, together with extensive
ranges of buildings in the old Fish Market and
Assembly Closes, to -which it was the means of
communicating the flames.
While these tall and stately edifices were yielding
to destruction, the night grew calm and still, and
THE ROYAL EXCHANGE.
sooth-west, turned them, as they burst from the
gaping windows, in the direction of a house to the
eastward, the strong' gable of which saved it from
the destruction which seemed imminent.
Two tenements to the westward were less fortunate,
and as, from the narrowness of the ancient
close, it was impossible to work the engines, they
soon were involved in one frightful and appalling
blaze. Great fears mere now entertained for the
venerable Courant office; nor was it long before
the fire seized on its upper storey, at the very time
when some brave fellows got upon the roof of a
tenement to the westward, and shouted to the firemen
to give them a pipe, by which they could
piay upon the adjoining roof, But, owing either
I the sparks emitted by the flames shot upwards as if
spouted from a volcano, and descended like the
thickest drift or snow-storm, affecting the respiration
of all. A dusky, lurid red tinged the clouds,
and the glare shone on the Castle wdls, the
rocks of the Calton, the beetling crags, and all the
city spires. Scores of lofty chimneys, set on fire
by the falling sparks, added to the growing horror
of the scene ; and for a considerable time the Tron
Church was completely enveloped in this perilous
shower of embers.
About one in the morning of the 16th the alarm
of fire was given from a house directly oppoife to
the burning masses, and, though groundless, it
added to the deepening Consternation. Mean ... Great Fire.] THE GREAT FIRE. 189 Assemlily Close, then occupied as a workshop by Kirkwood, a well-known ...

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men of rank, another plot to storm it, at a time
when its garrison was the nsth, or old regiment of
Edinburgh, was formed by Lord John Drummond,
son of the Earl of Perth, with eighty men, mostly
Highlanders, and all of resolute courage. All these
-among whom was a Captain McLean, who had
lost a leg at Killiecrankie, and an Ensign Arthur,
late of the Scots Guards-were promised commissions
under King James, and IOO guineas each, if
ROYAL LODGING AND HALF-MOON BATTERY.
when the plot was marred by-a lady !
In the exultation he felt at the approaching
capture, and the hope he had of lighting the beacon
which was to announce to Fife and the far north
that the Castle was won, Ensign Arthur unfolded
the scheme to his brother, a physician in the city,
who volunteered for the enterprise, but most prudently
told his wife of it, and she, alarmed for his
safety, at once gave information to the Lord Justice
the event succeeded ; and at that crisis-when Mar
was about to fight the battle of Sheriffmuir-it
might have put him in possession of all Scotland.
Drummond contrived to suborn four of the garrison
-a sergeant, Ainslie, to whom he promised a
lieutenancy, a corporal, who was to be made an
ensign, and two privates, who got bribes in money.
On the night of the 8th September, when the
troops marched from the city to fight the Earl of
Mar, the attempt was made. The chosen time,
near twelve o'clock, was dark and stormy, and the
ilrodlcs operandi was to be by escalading the western
walls, near the ancient arched postern. A ladder,
equipped with great hooks to fix it to the cope of
the bastion, and calculated to admit four men
Clerk, Sir Adam Cockburn of Ormiston, who instantly
put himself in communication with Colonel
Stuart. Thus, by the time the conspirators were
at the foot of the wall the whole garrison was
under arms, the sentinels were doubled, and the
ramparts patrolled.
The first party of forty men, led by the resolute
Lord Drummond and the wooden-legged McLean,
had reached the foot of the wall unseen ; already
the ladder had been secured by Sergeant Ainslie,
and the escalade was in the act of ascending, with
pistols in their girdles and swords in their teeth,
when a Lieutenant Lindesay passed with his patrol,
and instantly gave an alarm I The ladder and all
on it fell heavily on the rocks below. A sentinel ... of rank, another plot to storm it, at a time when its garrison was the nsth, or old regiment of Edinburgh, ...

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OLD -4NU NEW EDINBURGH. ... v11t
CHAPTER XXXIV.
INCHKEITH.
PAGE
The Defences of Leith-Inchkeith Forts-%. Serf-The Pest-stricken in 1497-Experiment of James lV.-The Old Fort-Johnson and
Boswell-The New Chanuel -Colonel Moggridge's P l a n j T h e 'I hree New Forts-Magazines and Barracks-The Lighthouse . . 290
CHAPTER XXXV.
NEWHAVEN.
Cobbett on Edinburgh-Jam- IV.'s Dockyard -His Gift of Newhaven to Edinburgh-The GYCQ~ Michapl-Embarkation of Mary of Guise
-Woc.ks at Newhaven in the Sixteenth Century-The Links-Viscount Newhaven-The Feud with Prestonpans-The Sea Fencibles
--Chain Pier-Dr. Fairhirn-The E ishwives-Superstitions . , . . . , . . . . . . . . . 295
CHAPTER XXXVI.
WARDIE, TRINITY, AND GRANTO~.
Wardie Muir-Human Remqins Found-Bangholm Bower and Trinity Lodge-Christ Church, Trinity-Free Church, Granton Road-Pilton
-Royston-Caroline Park-Granton-The Piers and Harhuun-Morton's Patent Slip , . . . . . . , . . 306
CHAPTER XXXVII.
THE ENVIRONS OF EDINBURGH.
Cramond-Origin of the Name-Cramond of that Ilk-Ancient Charters - Inchmickery-Lord Cramond--Bdrnton -Goer and its Proprietors-
Saughton Hall--Riccarton . . . . . . , . . . . . . . , . . . , . . 3'4
CH AI'TE R XXXVI 11.
THE EXVIRONS OF EDINBURGH (confinzed).
Colinton-Ancient Name and Church-Redhall-The Family of Foulis-Dreghom -The Pentlands-View from Tqhin-Comiston-Slateford-
Grnysmill-Liberton -The Mill at Nether Liberton-Liberton Tower-The Chiirch-The Balm Well of St. Katherine-Grace
Mount-The Wauchopes of Niddrie-Niddrie House-St Katherine's-The Kaime-Mr. Clement Little-Lady Little 01 Lihrton . 322
CHAPTER XXXIX.
THE EXVIRONS OF EDINBURGH (continued).
Cnrrie-Origin of the Name-Roman Camps-The Old Church and Temple Lands-Lennox Tower-Curriehill Castle and the Skenes-
Scott of Malleny-James Andelson, LL.D.--"Camp Meg" and her Story . . . . . . . . . . , . 130
CHAPTER XL.
THE ENVIRONS OF EDIXBURGH (coalinued).
The Inch House-The WinramcEdmonstone and the Edmon.;tones of ttat Ilk-Witches-Woolmet-The Stenhouse-Moredun-The
' .338 Stewarts of Goodtrees-The Buckstane-Burdiehoux-Its Limekilns and Fossils . . . . , I . . . , . ... -4NU NEW EDINBURGH. ... v11t CHAPTER XXXIV. INCHKEITH. PAGE The Defences of Leith-Inchkeith Forts-%. ...

Vol. 6  p. 397 (Rel. 0.23)

OLD -4NU NEW EDINBURGH. ... v11t
CHAPTER XXXIV.
INCHKEITH.
PAGE
The Defences of Leith-Inchkeith Forts-%. Serf-The Pest-stricken in 1497-Experiment of James lV.-The Old Fort-Johnson and
Boswell-The New Chanuel -Colonel Moggridge's P l a n j T h e 'I hree New Forts-Magazines and Barracks-The Lighthouse . . 290
CHAPTER XXXV.
NEWHAVEN.
Cobbett on Edinburgh-Jam- IV.'s Dockyard -His Gift of Newhaven to Edinburgh-The GYCQ~ Michapl-Embarkation of Mary of Guise
-Woc.ks at Newhaven in the Sixteenth Century-The Links-Viscount Newhaven-The Feud with Prestonpans-The Sea Fencibles
--Chain Pier-Dr. Fairhirn-The E ishwives-Superstitions . , . . . , . . . . . . . . . 295
CHAPTER XXXVI.
WARDIE, TRINITY, AND GRANTO~.
Wardie Muir-Human Remqins Found-Bangholm Bower and Trinity Lodge-Christ Church, Trinity-Free Church, Granton Road-Pilton
-Royston-Caroline Park-Granton-The Piers and Harhuun-Morton's Patent Slip , . . . . . . , . . 306
CHAPTER XXXVII.
THE ENVIRONS OF EDINBURGH.
Cramond-Origin of the Name-Cramond of that Ilk-Ancient Charters - Inchmickery-Lord Cramond--Bdrnton -Goer and its Proprietors-
Saughton Hall--Riccarton . . . . . . , . . . . . . . , . . . , . . 3'4
CH AI'TE R XXXVI 11.
THE EXVIRONS OF EDINBURGH (confinzed).
Colinton-Ancient Name and Church-Redhall-The Family of Foulis-Dreghom -The Pentlands-View from Tqhin-Comiston-Slateford-
Grnysmill-Liberton -The Mill at Nether Liberton-Liberton Tower-The Chiirch-The Balm Well of St. Katherine-Grace
Mount-The Wauchopes of Niddrie-Niddrie House-St Katherine's-The Kaime-Mr. Clement Little-Lady Little 01 Lihrton . 322
CHAPTER XXXIX.
THE EXVIRONS OF EDINBURGH (continued).
Cnrrie-Origin of the Name-Roman Camps-The Old Church and Temple Lands-Lennox Tower-Curriehill Castle and the Skenes-
Scott of Malleny-James Andelson, LL.D.--"Camp Meg" and her Story . . . . . . . . . . , . 130
CHAPTER XL.
THE ENVIRONS OF EDIXBURGH (coalinued).
The Inch House-The WinramcEdmonstone and the Edmon.;tones of ttat Ilk-Witches-Woolmet-The Stenhouse-Moredun-The
' .338 Stewarts of Goodtrees-The Buckstane-Burdiehoux-Its Limekilns and Fossils . . . . , I . . . , . ... -4NU NEW EDINBURGH. ... v11t CHAPTER XXXIV. INCHKEITH. PAGE The Defences of Leith-Inchkeith Forts-%. ...

Vol. 6  p. 398 (Rel. 0.23)

OLD -4NU NEW EDINBURGH. ... v11t
CHAPTER XXXIV.
INCHKEITH.
PAGE
The Defences of Leith-Inchkeith Forts-%. Serf-The Pest-stricken in 1497-Experiment of James lV.-The Old Fort-Johnson and
Boswell-The New Chanuel -Colonel Moggridge's P l a n j T h e 'I hree New Forts-Magazines and Barracks-The Lighthouse . . 290
CHAPTER XXXV.
NEWHAVEN.
Cobbett on Edinburgh-Jam- IV.'s Dockyard -His Gift of Newhaven to Edinburgh-The GYCQ~ Michapl-Embarkation of Mary of Guise
-Woc.ks at Newhaven in the Sixteenth Century-The Links-Viscount Newhaven-The Feud with Prestonpans-The Sea Fencibles
--Chain Pier-Dr. Fairhirn-The E ishwives-Superstitions . , . . . , . . . . . . . . . 295
CHAPTER XXXVI.
WARDIE, TRINITY, AND GRANTO~.
Wardie Muir-Human Remqins Found-Bangholm Bower and Trinity Lodge-Christ Church, Trinity-Free Church, Granton Road-Pilton
-Royston-Caroline Park-Granton-The Piers and Harhuun-Morton's Patent Slip , . . . . . . , . . 306
CHAPTER XXXVII.
THE ENVIRONS OF EDINBURGH.
Cramond-Origin of the Name-Cramond of that Ilk-Ancient Charters - Inchmickery-Lord Cramond--Bdrnton -Goer and its Proprietors-
Saughton Hall--Riccarton . . . . . . , . . . . . . . , . . . , . . 3'4
CH AI'TE R XXXVI 11.
THE EXVIRONS OF EDINBURGH (confinzed).
Colinton-Ancient Name and Church-Redhall-The Family of Foulis-Dreghom -The Pentlands-View from Tqhin-Comiston-Slateford-
Grnysmill-Liberton -The Mill at Nether Liberton-Liberton Tower-The Chiirch-The Balm Well of St. Katherine-Grace
Mount-The Wauchopes of Niddrie-Niddrie House-St Katherine's-The Kaime-Mr. Clement Little-Lady Little 01 Lihrton . 322
CHAPTER XXXIX.
THE EXVIRONS OF EDINBURGH (continued).
Cnrrie-Origin of the Name-Roman Camps-The Old Church and Temple Lands-Lennox Tower-Curriehill Castle and the Skenes-
Scott of Malleny-James Andelson, LL.D.--"Camp Meg" and her Story . . . . . . . . . . , . 130
CHAPTER XL.
THE ENVIRONS OF EDIXBURGH (coalinued).
The Inch House-The WinramcEdmonstone and the Edmon.;tones of ttat Ilk-Witches-Woolmet-The Stenhouse-Moredun-The
' .338 Stewarts of Goodtrees-The Buckstane-Burdiehoux-Its Limekilns and Fossils . . . . , I . . . , . ... -4NU NEW EDINBURGH. ... v11t CHAPTER XXXIV. INCHKEITH. PAGE The Defences of Leith-Inchkeith Forts-%. ...

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2 14 OLD AND NEW EDINBURGH. . [Castle Terrace.
Place, and now chiefly used as a coal dep8t.
Some of the merchants having coal offices here
are among the oldest and most extensive firms in
the city, one having been established so far back
as 1784 and having now business ramifications so
ample as to require a complete system of private
telegraphs for the transmission of orders between
their various offices and coal stores throughout
Edinburgh and the suburbs.
This station is reached from the East Princes
Street Gardens by a tunnel 3,000 feet in length,
passing under the West Church burial ground
and the foundations of several streets, and serves
as a port for the North British system at the West
End.
In its vicinity, on the north side of the way, is
a large Winter Garden at the corner between the
Glasgow Road and Coates Gardens. It was
formed in 1871, and has a southern front 130 feet
in length, with a main entrance 50 feet wide, 30
feet long, and surmounted by a dome 65 feet in
height.
A little westward of it is West Coates Established
Church, built in the later Pointed style, in
1869, with a tower and spire 130 feet in height.
It cost &7,500, and is seated for go0 persons.
The United Presbyterian Churches in Palmerston
Place (the old line of Bell's Mills Loan) and
Dalry Road were opened in 1875, and cost respectively
,f;13,000 and 'L5,ooo. The former is
an imposing edifice in the classic Italian style,
with a hexastyle portico, carrying semicircular
headed arches and flanked by towers IOO feet in
height.
On the gentle swell of the ground, about 600
yards westward of the Haymarket, amid a brilliant
urban landscape, stands Donaldson's Hospital, in
magnitude and design one of the grandest edifices
of Edinburgh, and visible from a thousand points
all round the environs to the westward, north,
and south. It sprang from a bequest of about
~210,000 originally by James Donaldson of
. Broughton Hall, a printer, at one time at the
foot of the ancient Rest Bow, who died in the
year 1830.
It was erected between the years 1842 and 1851,
after designs by W. H. Playfair, at a cost of about
~IOO,OOO, and forms a hollow quadrangle of 258
feet by 207 exteriorly, and 176 by 164 interiorly.
It is a modified variety of a somewhat ornate
Tudor style, and built of beautiful freestone. It
has four octagonal five-storeyed towers, each IZO
feet in height, in the centre of the main front,
and four square towers of four storeys each at the
corners; and most profuse, graceful, and varied
-
ornamentations on all the four fapdes, and much
in the interior.
It was speciallyvisited and much admired by
Queen Victoria in 1850, before it was quite completed,
and now maintains and ' educates poor
boys and girls. The building can accommodate
150 children of each sex, of whom a considerable
per centage are both deaf and dumb. According
to the rules of this excellent institution, those
eligible for admission are declared to be-'' I. Poor
children of the name of Donaldson or Marshall, if
appearing to the governors to be deserving. 2. Such
poor children as shall appear to be in the most destitute
circumstances and the most deserving of admission."
None are received whose parents are able
to support them. The children are clothed and
maintained in the hospital, and are taught such
useful branches of a plain education as will fit the
boys for trades and the girls for domestic service.
The age of admission is from seven to nine, and
that of leavhg the hospital fourteen years. The
Governors are the Lord Justice-General, the Lord
Clerk Register, the Lord Advocate, the Lord Provost,
the Principal of the University, the senior
minister of the Established Church, the ministers
of St. Cuthbert's and others ex-officio.
The Castle Terrace, of recent erection, occupies
the summit of a steep green bank westward of
the fortress and overhanging a portion of the old
way from the West Port to St. Cuthbert's. A
tenement at its extreme north-western corner is
entirely occupied by the Staff in Scotland. Here
are the offices of the Auxiliary Artillery, Adjutant-
General, Royal Engineers, the medical staff, and
the district Con~missariat.
Southward of this stands St. Mark's Chapel,
erected in 1835, the only Unitarian place of
worship in Edinburgh. It cost only Lz,ooo, and
is seated for 700. It has an elegant interior, and
possesses a iine organ. Previous to 1835 its congregation
met in a chapel in Young Street.
Near it, in Cambridge Street, stands the new
Gaelic Free Church, a somewhat village-like erection,
overshadowed by the great mass of the
United Presbyterian Theological Hall. The latter
was built in 1875 for the new Edinburgh or West
End Theatre, from designs by Mr. Pilkington, an
English architect, who certainly succeeded in
supplying an edifice alike elegant and comfortable.
In its fiqt condition the auditorium measured
70 feet square within the walls, and the accommodation
was as follows-pit and stalls, 1,ooo ;
dress circle and private boxes, 400; second
circle, 600; gallery, 1,000; total, 3,000. The
stage was expansive, and provided with all the ... 14 OLD AND NEW EDINBURGH. . [Castle Terrace. Place, and now chiefly used as a coal dep8t. Some of the merchants ...

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George Street.] THE BLACKWOODS. I39
CHAP,TER XIX.
GEORGE STREET.
Major Andrew Faser-The Father of Miss Femer-Grant of Kilgraston-William Blackwoad and his Magazine-The Mother of Sir Waltn
Scott-Sir John Hay, Banker-Colquhoun of Killermont-Mrs. Murray of Henderland-The Houses of Sir J. W. Gomon, Sir Jam-
Hall. and Sir John Sinclair of Ulbster-St. Andrew's Church-Scene of the Disruption-Physicians' Hall-Glance at the Histcry of thecollege
of Physicians-Sold and Removed-The Commercial Bank-Its Constitution-Assembly Rooms-Rules of 17+Banquet to Black
Watch-" The Author of Waverley"-The Music Hall-The New Union Bank-Its Formation, &c.-The Mlasonic Hall-Watsoa'E
Pictureof Bums-Statues of George IV., Pitt, and Chalmers. .
PREVIOUS to the brilliant streets and squares
erected in the northern and western portions of
new Edinburgh, George Street was said to have no
rival in the world ; and even yet, after having undergone
many changes, for combined length, space,
uniformity, and magnificence of vista, whether
viewed from the east or west, it may well be
pronounced unparalleled. Straight as an arrow
flies, it is like its sister streets, but is 1x5 feet
broad. Here a great fossil tree was found in 1852.
A portion of the street on the south side, near
the west end, long bore the name of the Tontine,
and owing to some legal dispute, which left the
houses there mfinished, they were occupied as
infantry barracks during the war with France.
Nos. 3 and 5 (the latter once the residence of
Major Andrew Fraser and cf William Creech the
eminent bookseller) forni the office of the Standard
Life Assurance Company, in the tympanum of
which, over four fine Corinthian pilasters, is a
sculptured group from the chisel of Sir John Steel,
representing the parable of the Ten Virgins. In
George Street are about thirty different insurance
offices, or their branches, all more or less ornate
in architecture, and several banks.
In No. 19, on the same side, is the Caledonian,
the oldest Scottish insurance company (having
been founded in June, 1805). Previously the
office had been in Bank Street. A royal charter
was granted to the company in May, 1810, and
twenty-three years afterwards the business of life
assurance was added to that of fire insurance.
No. 25 George Street was the residence (from
1784 till his death, in 18zg), of Mr. James Ferrier,
Principal Clerk of Session, and father of Miss
Susan Ferrier, the authoress of " Marriage," &c.
He was a keen whist player, and every night of his
life had a rubber, which occasionally included Lady
Augusta Clavering, daughter of his friend and client
John, fifth Duke of Argyll, and old Dr. Hamilton,
usually designated " Cocked Hat " Hamilton, from
the fact of his being one of the last in Edinburgh
who bore that head-piece. When victorious, he
wcdd snap his fingers and caper about the room,
to tbe manifest indignation of Mr. Ferrier, who
would express it to his partner in the words, "Lady
Augusta, did you ever see such rediculous leevity
in an auld man 7 " Robert Burns used also to be
a guest at No. 25, and was prescnt on one occasion
when some magnificent Gobelins tapestry arrived
there for the Duke of Argyll on its way to Inverary
Castle. Mrs. Piozzi also, when in Edinburgh, dined
there. Next door lived the Misses Edmonstone,
of the Duntreath family, and with them pitched
battles at whist were of frequent nightly occurrence.
These old ladies figure in " Marriage " as
Aunts Jacky, Grizzy, and Nicky; they were grandnieces
of the fourth Duke of Argyll. The eldest
Miss Ferrier was one of the Edinburgh beauties in
her day ; and Bums once happening to meet her,
while turning the corner of George Street, felt suddenly
inspired, and wrote the lines to her enclosed
in an elegy on the death of Sir D. H. Hair. Miss
Ferrier and Miss Penelope, Macdonald of Clanronald,
were rival belles ; the former married
General Graham ot Stirling Castle, the latter Lord
Belhaven.
In No. 32 dwelt Francis Grant of Kilgraston,
father of Sir Francis Grant, President of the Royal
Academy, born in 1803 ; and No. 35, now a shop,
was the town house of the Hairs of Balthayock, in
Perthshire.
No. 45 has long been famous as the establishment
of Messrs. Blackwood, the eminent publishers.
William Blackwood, the founder of the magazine
which stills bears his name, and on the model of
which so many high-class periodicals have been
started in the sister kingdom, was born at Edinburgh
in 1776, and after being apprenticed to the
ancient bookselling firni of Bell and Bradfute, and
engaging in various connections with other bibliopoles,
in 1804 he commenced as a dealer in old
books on the South Bridge, in No. 64, but soon
after became agent for several London publishing
houses. In 1S16 he disposed of his vast stock of
classical and antiquarian books, I 5,000 volumes in
number, and removing to No. 17 Princes Street,
thenceforward devoted his energies to the business
of a-general publisher, and No. 17 is to this day a
bookseller's shop. ... Street.] THE BLACKWOODS. I39 CHAP,TER XIX. GEORGE STREET. Major Andrew Faser-The Father of Miss ...

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386 OLD AND NEW' EDINBURGH.
'Plague in Leith, The 111. 180,186
Plainstane's close ~ i . 235
Playfair, Dr. Lyo;, 111. 24
Playfair, Professor, 1. 339, 11.106,
1% 1p,z70' monument to,II.rro
Playfaii, W. H., architect, I. 379,
11. 83 88, 97, 106, 110, 2x41 335,
111. ;3, 68, 83
Playhouse Close 11. 23
Pleasance, he, i. 38, 253,278,295.
298, 335, 382-384, 11. 3, 218 135,
240, 301, 3247 330, 337, 3383 345,
111.54 ; origin of thename, I. 382
Plewlands, The, 111. 42
Pocketsleve 111.92
PokerCluh ?he, I . ~ O , Z ~ T , I I I . I ~ ~
Police of Ehinburgh, 11. 120
Police Office, I. 242
Political unions. Illegality of the, . - -
11. 236, 237
Pollok. Robert. 11. ICO
Polton Lord iII. 3;6
PolwAh d d y 11. aog
Pont, dkrt, dinister of St. Cuthbert's
Church 11. 131 I 2
Pont, Robert, hrovost 'o?Trinity
Pontheus, John, the quack doctor,
Poole's Coffee-house, 11. xza
Popular songs of 1745, I. 325
Port Hopetoun, 11.~15~226 ; Edinbur
h Castle from, 11. *a16
Port .ft. Nicholas, 111. 171
Portmus Captain I. 130 111.262
263 ; hHnged b;the mdb, I. 130:
College, 1.305, 307
I. zoo, 201
~. z3i, 11. 2 I, 232
Porteous john, herald painter,
111.4:
Porreou~ riots I. 4 123, 128-1 I
178, 218, 3:g; h n t i n g ~f t2:
111. III .___ ._
Portland, Henrietta Duchess of,
Portland,'Duke of, 111.42
Portland Place 11. zza
Portobello, I. h3, 111. 138, 143-
154165; Romanroadnear I. 10,
fro; view of Portobed, III.
:IN, *152, *r53: plan of, 111. . 147: churchesandchawls. 111.
II.rg1 111.42
- .
147; * 153
Portobello Hut. 111. IM
Portobello review lhe' '111. 146
Portobello Koad '111. ;38
Portobello Sand; 111.145, Plate p
Rortsburgh CO& House, 11. *=I. -
2=4
Porbburgh, The Eastern, I. 3 8 , k
l p , I I . 222 224 226 227,22gr 334
33s ; anciehtly H htirgh, 11. 103
Post Office, The old, I. 274 338,
*356; the new I. 340, 351, 353,
*357,358.364; ;he Scottishpostal
system, I. 353- 58 : itsexpenses
at various periJs, I. 355,356; its
posf-ten 1.354,355,39; the
vanous po&office buildings, I.
358
Post Office Close, I. 358
Potato, The introducer of the, 11. p
Potterrow, The, 1. p, 335,II. 135,
231, =4=r 274. 327, 330, 33% 332,
Potterrow ort, 11. 257, 334 331,
111.3
Poulterer The King's 111.66
Poultry AndS. Dean,'III. 65, 66
Poultry Market The old I. 373
Powburn, The ' 11. 267 ' 111. 29
I 58; its otier names:
Powburn House 111. 51
Powderhall III:88 8g *g3
Powrie, di1liaq 'ac<ornplice ot
Bothwell in the murder of Darnley,
1. 263, 276, 111. 4, 6
Prayer, An ambiguous, 11. 133
Preaching Friar's Vennel, The, I.
Preaching Window," Knox'r
house, I. 214
3331 3 3 4 , p 345, 111. 51
81.:; '
'( p7,258
Pre-historic Edinburgh, I. 9-14
Prendergast's revenqe, 11. 52, 53
.Prentice, Henry, the introducer 01
Presbyterian Church, Re-establish.
.Preston, John, Lord Fentonbams,
the potato, 11. 30
ment of the, 11.246
-1.206 -
Preston, Sir Michael, I. q
&ton of Craigmillar Provost Sir
?reston of Craignillar. Sir Richard.
Henry, 11. 242, 278,'III. 61
111.61
?reston of Craigmillar, Provost Sir
Simon, I. w, 305, 11.279.111.
58, 59, 61, 62, 107
'reston of Valleyfield, Sir Charles,
11. 26, 335
326, 330. ,331: 332.
?reston, Lieut.-General, I. 322,323.
?redon relic, bt. Giles's Cathedral,
I. 140
?restonAeld manor-house, 111. *56,
57, 58
?restongrange, Lord, 11.242, 272,
111.10
?restonpans, 11. 283 16,.340, 111.
IM, 174, a63; the' ishermen of,
111. 300 ; battle of (see Battles)
?reston Street, 111. 50
?retender, Defence of the, 111.194
?rice, Sir Magnus, 1. 117
?nestfield or Prestonfield, I. 3 2 6 3 .
Primrose, Viscount, I. m3,II. 124;
Primrose, Si Archibald, I. 91,111.
?rimrose Lady Dorothea, I. 257
Primus 'khe title 11. 246
Prince 'Anne of benmarks Dragoons
I. 64
Prince kharley's house, Duddmgston
11. *317
Princ;Consort, The, I. 358,II. 79;
memorial to, 11. 175, '77, a84
PrinceofWales, Marrageof, 11.284
Prince of Wales's Graving Dock,
Leith, 111. 286, q8g
358, 3647372r 11- 93, 95, 99s 100,
14, 1x0, 114, 117, 118, 119-130,
176, 182, 191 no6, zog, ?XI, 213,
372, 383,111.'146, 295 ; view from
Scott'smonument, 11.*124: view
looking west, 11. * '25
hinale, Andrew Lord Haining, I.
315, III.5p
Viscountess, I. 104
I06
Princes Street, I.39,a55,295, 339.
131,136, 139, 151, 163, 165, 175,
27;
Pringle, Sir Walter, I. 1%
Pringle, Thomas 11. 140
Pringle of Stichel, Colonel, 111.45;
Printed, Number of, in Edinburgh
Printing-press, The first, in Scot-
Prison& of 'war in Edinburgh
Privy C&ud, Imd Keeper of the,
Proctor John thecartoonist,III. 82
Project' for :urprising Edinburgh
Promisc;ous dancing, Presbyterian
Property Investment Society, I. 123
Protestant Institute, I. zg , 11. z6a
Provost of Edinburgh, Salary and
privileges of the, 11. 281, 111.
270; his first appearance in official
decorations, 11. 282
Provost Stewart's Land. West Bow,
Lady 11. 163
in 1779, I. 318
land I. 142 255
Castle 11. a48
1. 370. 372
Castle I. 67
abhorrence of, I. 315
I. 325
Provosts of Leith, The, 111. q,
Provat's Close, 11. 277
Provost's House. Kirk+f-Field,
219, zm, 270
111.3
Publicopinionin Edinburgh, Weak.
ness of formerly I. 285
PuirFolks'Purses:The,I. 138, 11.6
Pulteney, Sir ames 1. 106 '' Purging *' o/ the Scottish army,
Furitan g&ner,Anecdote ofa, 1.56
Pye, Sir Robert, 111. 260, 261
111. 186 187
Q
Quadrangle, The, Holymod Palace,
Quality Street. Leith, III.2~1,235,
11. '76
. .
Q,';?ity Wynd, Rotten Row, Leith
Quarry Holes, The, 11. 101, zw
Queen Mary (sec Mary Stuart)
111. 173
111. 128, 133, 151
Queen Mary's Apartments, Holyrood
Palace 11. 66, * 67, 74 ; h u
bedchambei, ib.
Queen Mary's Bath, 11. 40, 41
!&.en Mary's Bower, Moray
House 11. *32 33
&een Mary's r&m Dungeon in
Edinburgh Castle below, I. *ZI,
,R
Q&en Mary's room, Rmeburn
House, 111. 103
Queen Mary's sundial 11. 68, 73
Queen Marys tree i1. 316; her
pear.tree, Mercdiston Castle,
Plate 26 ; her tree at Craigmillar
Castle 111. 59 *60 . Queen itreet, iI. 115, 151-158,
*16o 162 175 186 18 ,194, 199,
Que& d e e t Gardens, 11.185~194.
&eenptreet, k i t h , III.r73,qo,
Queen's Dock Leith 111. 283 285
Queen's Drivi, The, \. XI, 11.'303.
ZW ;U2 d83, iI8, i72, III. 74,106
am
ueen Street Hall 111. 88
231, 232
312
Brigade, 1. 286
the, Ptate 23
turret near the I. * 49, 78
11. 17
Queen's Edinburgh Rifle Volunteer
Queen's Park, Volunteer review in
Queen.s Post, Ancient postern and
Queen's Theatre k d Opera Houl,
Queen $ctoria'svisit to Edinburgh,
11. 354, 362
Queensberry, Duke of, I. 162. 164,
11. 8, 35, 38, 225, 226, 351, 111.
Queensberry Duchess of I 155,
11. 37 ; herleccentric habh,.II. 38
Quernsbeny Earl of, 11. a53
Queensberry'House, Canongate, I.
1058 1'55, 327. 11. 10, 357 36, 37,
38; its present use, 11. 38
Queensberrv Lodge, 11. 38
Queensferry, I. 16, 19,II. 101. I!I.
Q u e e n 2 4 Road, 11. 115,185,sm,
Qneensferry Street, 11. 136
Qqhitncss John of, Provost, 11.278
Quince? +hornas de, 11. 135, 140,
246, 265,365
63,211, 306,307,314 ; theherrug
fishe at 111. p
207, 111. 255 - II.74,359
R
Rae Sir David 11. 26 203
~ a e l Sir Wildm 11. ;27, III. 33c
Rae: Lady, !I. &, 339
&burn, Sir Henry, I. 119, 159,
a y , 384, 11. 88, go. gz, xzz,1z6,
his stepdaughter, 111. 77
Hadical Road," The, 11. II
I. 285
11. 188
187. 188, 111. 7lr 74, 6, 77, 140;
Raeburn Place, 111.79
Railston Bishop of Dunked, 11.54
Railway;, their influence foreseen,
Ramsay, Allan (see Allan Ramsay:
Ramsay, Allan, the painter, 1. 83,
Ramsay, Sir Alexander 11. 206
Ramsay, Sir Alexander,'Provost, I.
Ramsay of Dalhousie. Sir Alex.
y s Close, 11. I8
'99
ande;, I. 24, 25, 111.354, 355
Ramsay of Abbotshall, Sir Andrew.
I. 311, 11. 74 ; Lord Provost, 11.
,281
Ramsay, Sir George I. 162
Ramsay, Sir John, IiI. 42
Ramsay of Balmain, Sir John, 11.
Ramsay, Sir William 11. 166
Ramsay of Dalhousii, Sir W i l l i i
239
111.94
Ramsay, William, banker, 11. 362
111. 124
Ramsay, Cuthbert, I. 258
Ramsay Dean 11. 126, 205, 206
portrait of, 1;. * 128
Ramsay, Duel between Sir Georgq
and Capt. Macrae, 111. 13-14,
Ramsay, General John, I. 83, I1
I28
camsay, Lady, and Capt. Macrae,
<amay Lady Elizabeth 111.32
Zamsay: Miss Christian,'her fondcamsay,
The Misses, 111. 138
camsay Garden, I. 83, 11.82 ; view
camsay Lane, 1. 87. 91
camsay Lane, Portp,bello 111. *153 <amsnpS, Peter, White Horse
<am$y's Fort, Leith, 111. 171
tandolph Earl of Moray 11.47
candolph' Sir Thomas ; successful
re-captlre of the Castle by, 1. 24
candolph Cliff, 111. 70,75. f'tate 28
candolph Crescent, I. 237, 11. 11.5,
ZW, 2057 2071 20% 209
bnkeillor Street 11. 39
cankenion Club,'The, 11.180
lavelrig, 111. 334
tavelrig Hill, 111. 331
<avelston, I. 331, Ill. 79, 106
tavelston House 111. 106, 108
<wen's Craig ri. 307
<awdon Lad;Elizabeth, 11. 18
<ay Jdhn rectur of the high
Sc~ool, Ii. 290
<eade,Charles, thenovelist, 111.303
ieay George Lord II. 272, 111.8
<ay: Lady ElLabTeth Fairlie, 12
tecord of Entails, I. 372
cedbraes manor-house, 111. 88, 89. * 93. its changes, 111. p ' !&gauhet," References to, 11.
<edhallCastle, 111.313; themanor
tedheughs, 'I he 111. 114,31g,33r
<ed House The' 11. 330
teed. Robert. K'inp's architect. 11.
111. 139--14I
ness for cats, 11. 18
from Princes Street, Pidr 17
Inn ' 1. zgg
272, 346
270
house, 11.43
R&rig, KLdS of, 111. 134, 135,
Restalrig Lwh, 111. 13
Keston Lord, 11. 199
Restodtion festivals 11. 334
Restoration of Cha;les II., Popularity
of the, I. 55, '59, 176, 11.
334
Restoration of James VII., Plots
for the I. 66
Review dfScottish Volunteers, 1860,
11. 284.354 ; Plate 23
RevoliitionClub,The, 111. s a 3 ; i t ~
meLI, I. *63 .
168 ... OLD AND NEW' EDINBURGH. 'Plague in Leith, The 111. 180,186 Plainstane's close ~ i . 235 Playfair, Dr. Lyo;, ...

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iv OLD AND NEW EDINBURGH. -
CHAPTER VI.
THE VALLEY OF THE WATER OF LEITH.
PAGE
Lady Sinclair of Dunbeath-Bell's Mills-Water of Leith Village-Mill at the Dean-Tolbwth there-Old Houses-The Dean and Poultry
-Lands thereof-The Nisbet Family-A Legend-The Dean Village-Belgrave Crescent-The Parish Church-Stewart's Hospital-
Orphan Hospita-John Watson's Hospital-The Dean Cemetery-Notable Interments there . . . . . . . . . 62
CHAPTER VII.
VALLEY OF THE WATER OF LEITH (continued).
The Dean Bridge-Landslips at Stockbridge-Stone Coffins-Floods in the Leith-Population in ~74z-St. Bernard's Estate-Rods Tower-
" Chritopher North " in Aune Street-De Quincey there-St. Bernard's Well-Cave at Randolph Cliff-Veitchs Square-Churches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . in the Locality-Sir Henry Raeburn-Old Deanhaugh House ' 70
CHAPTER VIII.
VALLEY OF THE WATER OF LEITH (concluded).
E.niiuent Men connected with Stockbridge-David Robert7. RA.--K Macleay, R.S.A.-James Browne, LL.D.-James Hogg-Sir J. Y.
Simpson, Bart. -Leitch Ritchie-General Mitchell-G. R. Luke-Comely Bank-Fettes Collegc--Craigleith Quarry-Groat Hall-Silver
Mills-St. Stephen's Church-The Brothers Lauder-Jam- Drummond, R.S.A.-Deaf and -Dumb Institution-Dean Bank Institution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . -The Edinburgh Academy -78
CHAPTER IX.
CANONMILLS AND INVERLEITH.
CanonmillgThe Loch-Riots of 1784-The Gymnasium-Tanfield HalL-German Church-Zoological Gardens-Powder Hall-Rosebank
Cemetery-Red BraesThe Crawfords of Jordanhill-Bonnington-Bishop Keith-The Sugar Refinery-Pilrig-The Balfour Family-
Inverleith-Ancient ProprietorsThe Touris-The Rocheids-Old Lady Inverleith-General Crocket-Royal Botanical GardensMr.
JamesMacNab. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
CHAPTER X.
THE WESTERN NEW TOWN.
Coltbridge-Roseburn House-Traditions of it-Murrayfield-Lord Henderland-Beechwood-General Leslie-The Dundaxs-Ravelston-
The Foulises and Keiths-Craigcrook-Its fint Proprietors-A Fearful Tragedy-Archibald Constable-Lord Jeffrey-Davidson's
Mains-LauristonCastle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .IOZ
CHAPTER XI,
C O R S T O R P H I N E .
ContorphintSupposed Origin of the N a m t T h e Hill-James VI. hunting there-The Cross-The Spa-The Dicks of Braid and con^
phine-" Contorphine Cream '%onvalerent House-A Wraith-The Original Chapel-The Collegiate Church-Its Provosts-Its
Old Tombs-The Castle and Loch of Cohtorphine-The Forrester Family . . . . . . . . . . . . . I 12
CHAPTER XII.
rHE OLD EDINBURGH CLUBS.
Of Old Clubs, and some Notabilia of Edinburgh Life in the Last Century-The Horn Order-The Union Club-Impious Clubs--Assembly
of Birds-The Sweating Club-The Revolution and certain other Clubs-The Beggars' Benison -The Capillaim Club-The Industrious
Company-The Wig, Exulapian, Boar, Country Dinner, The East India, Cape, Spendthrift, Pious, Antemanurn, Six Feet, and
Shakespeare Clubs-Oyster Cellars-" Frolics "-The "Duke of Edinburgh" . . . . . . . . . . . . 122 ... OLD AND NEW EDINBURGH. - CHAPTER VI. THE VALLEY OF THE WATER OF LEITH. PAGE Lady Sinclair of Dunbeath-Bell's ...

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374
*316,317; view below Cramond
Brig, 111. '317
Cramond Bridge, 11. 63, 111. 1x1
CramondChurch 111. 316 '320
Cramond harbou; 111. 31;
Cramond House i11.317,318, *3a2
Cramond Island: 111.315
Cramond Regis, 111. 107, 316
Cramond, Baroness, 111. 315
Cranston, Mn., 111. 161
Cranston Street 11. 17
Cranstoun, Hdn. George, Lord
Corehouse, 11. 6, m7; his
sister 11. .106 111. IOI
Cranstdun, Thd- of, Provost, 11.
278
Cranstoun Geordie thedwarf 11.19
Crawford,'Earls of: I. 62, 68, mg,
Crawford of Jordanhill, Sir Hew,
Crawford'Sir Gregan I.'za
Crawford'of D ~ m s o i 11.181, 111.
11. 354,'III. 194, 222
111. 90- his daughters i6.
zg. 61, IS$ 34
Crawford S l r f V i l l h , 11. 47
Crawford' Captain, and Major
Crawford, S:r John, 111,. 51, 52, 5
Crawford, Thomas, High S c h d
Crawfoid of Jordanhill. Capt.. 111.
somuvhe I. 95
rector II. qa
. _ .
1 9 Crawfurd of Crad.udland, Howie-
CrZC;; j k e s , Provost, 11. a78
Creichtoun of Felde, Deputy Pm
Creighton, Willivn of 11. 47
~ r e e ~ h , william, bo~ise~~er, I. ' 5 5
139 ; portrait of, I. 156 ; Burns'
poem on, i. 156
Crceclr, Lord Provost, and Mh
Burns 11. 158 159
C-h': Land, i. 153. 156 191
"Creech's Levee," I. 156
Crichton, Lord Chancellor, 11. 54
Crichton, Bamn, I. zg, 30, 053
Crichton Castle, 111. 61
Crichton of Lugton, David, 11. 39
Crichton, h. Andrew, 111. 79
Crichtonb Dr. Archbald, 11. 123,
111. 162
Crichton, George, Bishop of Dun.
keld 1. 149 204 11. rj, 47, 48
Crichrbo, Rdhard: architect, 11.94
Crichton of Elliock, Robert, I. 126
Crichton, Lieut.-Col. Patrick, Ill.
161 ; duelhy, 111.16~ ; hisson, d.
Crichton Street, 11. 329, 334 333,
Cr%c%of Brunstane,The,III.xp
Cringletie, Lord, 11. 174
Crisp, Henry, 1. 343
Crispm, Feasts of St., 11. 104
Cruchalh Club, 1. 235, 239, 11.
Cmckat Lieut -General 111 95
Croft-ad-Righ,'m the Gield'of $
cromarty, Earls of, I. 1x1, 11, zg8,
Crombie's Close, 11. 239, 2~
Cromwell, Oher, I. 4, 54, 55. 56,
353. 367, 371. 11. 31, 73. rgz,2~8,
286, 290. 327,367, 375, 383, 111.
186,187, 193, 21% 222, 230, 2s
318,329,33073431 347 ; p r o p 3
statue of 111.72
ter, 1. 34
vost, 11.279
-157, 166, 176, 212, 229, 11. Im
157, 187, 111. IZZ
King, 11. 41, *#
215, 3x0
299. 3532 356 111- 30. I16 2 x 6
741 75, 159, -# %'B 218,227. 298,
439 99, 103, 1x3, 14% 143. 151,
Cromwelrs'tarracks III. 257
'' Crookbacked Dici" of Glouces
Crookshank the historian, I. 101
Crosby, Andrew, advocate, I. 192,
C-4 the City, I. 50, 60, 98, 1x6,
334 11. 2 62.75, 131,111.1~ 72,
146: 755 191. cruel punishments
ihct&l th&e, 1. 150, 151 ;
k q u e t s at the, I. zm; exccuuons
there, 11.14, III.187,268
zm 231.11. IF
122, 146, 152, 195, +03,227, 298,
C T GusewaY, 11. 334, 341, 3451
346
Cross Ke s Tavern I. 251
Cross of &. John iI. z
Cm~~rig, Lord 1.'161, 162, 11. 246
Crown Hotel, h. 118
OLD AND NEW EDINBURGH.
Crown-mom, Edinburgh Castle, I.
Cullayne, Capt. James, I. z6a
Cullen, Lord Robert I. 27, 11. 171
Cullen, Dr., I. 156,'171, 271, 11.
Culloden Battle if &te Battles)
Cumberl;nd, Duke of, I. 332. 334,
* 69
146, 302, 111. 23 35
I. 203 11. 281 111. 15
Cunninglham, si will- 11.153,
Cunnineham of Baberton. House
111. 57
of 11; 162
Curkingham Rev.Dr. 1.87 111.51
Cunninghamk, Dr. deorgk, the
Cunzie House. The, Candlemaker
phycian, 11. 298
. .
Row 11 *= .
CunzidNkk, ?he, 11. 267
Curious dream sto 111. rgz 193
currie, III. 321, ?36; its 1-1
history, 111. 39-333; its ancient
military remaim, 111. 331; the
bridge, III.33?,333; the church,
111. 332; heritors roll of the
parish. 111. 334 : longevity of its
inhabitants, 111. 337
Cnrrie's Close, 11. 236
Currie's Tavern, I. 179
Curriehill. Lord. 11. qm
Curriehil~castle, 111: 334
Currichill How, 11. 01 '' Curses," the Union Bong, I. 164
Custom House, Granton, 111. 14
Custom House, The, Leith, 311.
171. I I, 192, 228, 259, *264, z&
CustomhouxQua ,Lath, 111.273
Cuthbert's Lane, 11: 1.38
D
DArcy, Lady Camlime, 11. ~9
?+r Lord I 274
D+y Rmirw The I. 288 2@
Dalelcish. Bot'hwelis accokdia in
Dak Bailie Duff," 11. 255
Dm-le3smurder 1.263 f11. 6 6
Dalgleish, Nicol kinis& of St.
Cuthbert's Chukh, 11.131
Dalgleish'sClose I. z q 252
Dalhousie, Earl bf, I. :s+, 11. 26,
98, 166, 318, 111. 342 ; Countess
of 11. 318
DalLouie Marquis of 111. 88
Dalkeith, hlsof.11. &, 111. d g .
282,.311
Dalkeith, 11.236, 283, zg1,327, 111.
Dalieith House 111. 146
Dalkeith railwa;, I. 384
Dalkeith Road, 11. 346, 355, 111.
Dalmeny Park, 111. III
Dalry burn, 11. 347
Dalry, Uistrict of, 11.213, 216,217,
Dalry manor-house, II.*217,III. 78
Dalry Road 11. 214 216 217 218
Dalrynple, bavid, iard'Wdthall,
Dalrymple, Hugh,LadDNmmore,
Dalrymple, Sir David, I. 17ir 172,
Dalrymple Sir Hew, 111. 262, 340
Dalrympld Sir James, 11. 327
Dalrymple: Sir John, 11. 26, 86,
Dalrymple Sir Robert, 11. 143
DalrympldofCastleton, Sir Robert,
Dalrymple of Cousland, 11. 348
Dalrymple, William, 11. 293
Dalrymple, Ca t Hugh, 11. 231
WIrymple, JoRn of, Provost, II.
Dalymple, John, Provost, 11. 282,
DalrympL of Stair I. 62 111. 323
Dalrymple, Lady, iI. 342
Ilaliymple's Yard I. 219
Dalyell Sir John braham 11. r6a
Dalyell((or Dalrell), Sir Tiomas, I.
12,334; town mansion of, 11. 19
Dancing girl, Sale of a, I. 201
6r 134, 364
51, 57
111. 27, 35, 9a
I. 222
I. 251
11. 243s 366
272, 335
I. 276
278
I1 . 36
a4 161, m, 378, 11: 75, 354, 111.
Dancing school, The first, m Leith,
Danube Street, 111. 72, 79
Darien Company, 111. 190 ; office
Darien &edition, The, 111. 190
Darien House, 11. 323, 324, *325,
Dark ageofEdinburgh, I. 187,111.
Dark Pit The I. 6g
111. 231
of the 11. 322
326
126
116, 168, m.( 107, 276, 11. 18, 27,
Queen Mary and, I. 46 ; murder
of lI.jw,71 III.~--;r,m,23;emd
l m i n g o f i i s w y , 11.71, 111.7
Dasses The 11. 313
David k., 1. ;r, ~ 2 ~ 7 8 . 148,14g, 186:
II.&,III. 86, 26 339, 346,
legendof the d ? ? Z H k , 11.21,
22, 2% 42, 111. 19; charter of
H o l y r d Abbey, 11. 42, 43, 80,
David II., I. &, zk, 11. 3, 47, 53,
9+ '3% 3=5.3=7, 33'. 338, 354
Dand's miraculous cross, King,
11. #
David's Tower, Edinburgh Castle,
1. 26, 33 34, 36,*2# 44? 4% 48,49r
77 a ~i SS
Daad.& 2 Muirhouse 111. 316
Davidson's Close. 11. zi
D-b,'Lord' 1. 45.46. 47, 50, 78,
35, ~ 8 ~ 6 % 67,G% 74,286,III. 59 ;
180 111. 1x5 166 247
. 5 6 58, 278, 3% 111- 35, 41. 421
Davidson's Hook, Ca-tle Hill, I. 55
Davidson's Mains, 111. IIO
Davit: IJeans' Cottage, 1. 383, 384,
11. 310
Dawick, Laud of, I. 1%
Dawney Douglas's Tavern, I. 235 ;
the"CrownRwm,"ib.; lintelof
dqorway is, two views, 1. 235,
236
Dawson the comedian 11.24.
~ean damnia~ family 'of, II. 134
Dean: or Dene, Village of, I. 183,
3591 111- 62,633 642 66, 67, I*
Dean Bank 111.75- theeducaUonaI
institution III. 6
Dean Bridg;, I. 10, 111. 6 3 , y 70,
71, Pkte ZJ ; Roman urn onnd
near, 1,. xo
Dean Bndge Rcad, 111. 82
Dean cemetery, I. 218, IL am, -1
111. 63, 66, 68, '6g
Dean Church 111.67
Dean Farm iII. 67
Dean Haugh I. 366 II.28qIII. 65
Dean manoAhouse: 111. *65, 68;
h a n Orphan H q i t a l , HI. SI
Dean Path 111. 67
Dean Side,'III. 67
Dean Street, 111. 77
Dean Street Church: fh. 75
Dean T e n a a 111. 72,7
Deanhaugh Sireet, Stak%ridge, 11.
Deemster '$he (executioner), 1. ?42
Defencelhss state of the Fifeshire
-3t aftertheunion, III.194,197
DefenceJ of Leith,The, 111. zgc-zg5
De Foe, Daniel I. 216 zp, 11. 79
Degraver, Dr. Pierre, 1. 1x5
Deidchack The I. I 6
Denham, S'u J&es gtewart, 111.
its owners, III.66,67
Ij8, II1. 5, 79
146, 342
Denham, the actor, I. 350
Denham's Land, 11. 324, 325
Dental Hospitaland School, 11. 276
Derby, Countess of, mistress of
Charles II., 11. zr
Desmond Earls of I. 104
Destitute' Childred, Home for, 11.
26
Devil Legend of raising the, 11. 3
nevits Elbow The I. 7'
pwar's Close: 11. 6
Diamond Beetle &se: The j r r
Sesprit of 11. 207
Dick, Sir A l h d e r , 11. 86, 111.57,
1x4
Dick, Sir James, Lord Provost, I.
Dick of Grange, The family of,
Dick fa%,, The, 111. 114
Dick, Lady Anne, Strange habits
111.
of I 254, 111. 114 (rct Royston,
Lbrd)
Dick-Cunningham family 111. 56
Dickens, Charles, in Edinburgh, 11.
Dickison of Winkston. House of
'50
Digges, 3'0 the Zomeddian, I. 34% 343,
11. 23, z4, 111. 241
Dilettanti Socie The I. 108
Dingwall, Lord,?? z62,'III. 62
Dingwall Sir John I. 340
Dingwalis Castle, f. 340, 353
Dirleton Lord, 111. 318, 348
Dirom Colonel 11. 120, 174
Dirtyklub Th; 111. 12
Disruption'of d e Scottist Church,
11. 95, 96, 138, 1441 '45, m.5, 111-
Di%nterr Various sectsof, 111. p
Distress oi the Edinburgh poor UI
Dobdl Sydney 111. 148
Dock gtreet d i t h 111. 255
Dock Place,'Leith,'lII. 259
Doctors of Faculty Club, 111. 123
Dominicanmanasre lI.z50,~8+'
Darnley's body k n d in th;
gardensof 11. 286 288
Don, Sir Aixander,' 11. 159, 111.
1795 11. 283
339
Don, Si William, the actor, I. 351
Don, Lad I1 343, 111. 95
Donacha ha; 1.136
Donaldson'a dospital, I. 318, 11.
Do~ldson's Close. I. 318
Donalds~n, Dr. James, 11. 112, 126
Donaldson, the bookseller, 1. 3x8;
Donaldson. the theatrical author. 1.
214 PMC 10
hw son Jams, 1. 18, 11.214
DOMldSOll, Capt., d. 153
343,. y 5 '
DonnibnstleCastle, I. 246,III.11~
302
Eoo Park, 111. 37
Doubling the Cap," 111. 125
Douglas, Duke of I. 105, 14a, 11.
331, 354 351; buchess of, 11.
351, 111. 124
Douglas, Marquis of, 11. 3x7
Douglas, Earls Of, 2% 30. 31r34r 3%
old mansion ofthr. 11. 257
38. 39. 4 3 43. 258, 111. 133, 338 ;
Douglag Archibald, 'Earl d-Angus,
Douglas,.&hiba?d, Marquis, I I. 350
IJou~Is, Archbald Earl uf, 11.
Provost 11. 27
331,111. 3.2
Douglas, James Marquis of 11. 351
Douglas, James, Earl of harton,
DougL, Sir Archibald, I. 196
Douglas, Sir Archubald and Si
Dounlas. Sir Georee. I. 106
I1 80
Robert, 11. 59
Douglas' Sir am& '11. 283
Douglas' Sir keil, iI. 153
Douglas: Sir Rotprt, the historian.
I. I28,II. 35,37,1I1.11gr 318,348,
301
Douglac of Brackhouse, The family
~odg~as ofcave- I. 271
Douglas ofGlenbervie, Sir Willii,
Douglas of Hawthornden 111. 27
Douglas oCHawthornden,'Sir JoL,
Douglas of Hyvelie William, 111.34
Douglas of Kilspiddie Archibald,
Provost, 11. a79, do; begs the
royal intercession, 11. 280
Douglas of Parkhead, Sir James,
1. 54 I95
Douglas of Parkhead. George, the
murderer of Rizzio, I. 9, 11. 74
235; Provost, 11. 280
Douglas Ladylsabell I 97
Douglas'pcerage, The,?. 98,349--
Douglascs and Hamiltons, Feuds
Dough? of Spott 111. 330
DouglaqofWhitt:nghame, William,
of 111. 193, 315
11. 279, 111. 53
111. 354
35'
between the, 11. 63, 279, 285
1. 259,161 ... view below Cramond Brig, 111. '317 Cramond Bridge, 11. 63, 111. 1x1 CramondChurch 111. 316 ...

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craftsmen. Thus we see in the terraced slopes
illustrations of a mode of agriculture pertaining to
times before all written history, when iron had not
yet been forged to wound the virgin soil.?*
In those days the Leith must have been a broader
and a deeper river than now, otherwise the term
? Inverleith,? as its mouth, had never been given to
the land in the immediate vicinity of Stockbridge.
THE ROMAN ROAD, NEAR PORTOBULLO-THE ?? FISHWIVES? CAUSEWAY.?
(From a Draw+ 6y WaZh H. Palm, R.S.A.)
Other relics of the unwritten ages exist nea
Edinburgh in the shape of battle-stones ; but many
have been removed. In the immediate neigh.
hourhood of the city, close to the huge monolith
named the. Camus Stone, were two very large
conical cairns, named Cat (or Cdh) Stones, until
demolished by irreverent utilitarians, who had
found covetable materials in the rude memorial
stones.
Underneath these cairns were cists containing
human skeletons and various weapons of bronze
and iron. Two of the latter material, spear-heads,
are still preserved at Morton Hall. Within the
grounds of that mansion, about half a mile distant
from where the cairns stood, there still stands an
ancient monolith, and two larger masses that are in
its vicinity are not improbably the relics of a ruined
cromlech. ?? Here, perchance, has been the battleground
of ancient chiefs, contending, it may be,
with some fierce invader, whose intruded arts
startle us with evidences of an antiquity vhich
seems primeval. The locality is peculiarly suited
for the purpose. It is within a few miles of the
sea, and enclosed in an amphitheatre of hills ; it is
the highest ground in the immediate neighbourhood,
and the very spot on which the wamors of
a retreating host might be eFpected to make a
stand ere they finally betook themselves to the
adjacent fastnesses of the Pentland Hills.?
t On the eastern slope of the same hill there was found a singular relic
of a later period, which merits special notice from its peculiar characteristics.
It is a bronze matrix, bearing the device of a turbaued head, with
the legend SOLOMONB AR ISArounAd it Cin H ebrew characten j and
by some it has been supposed U, be a talisman or magical signet.
(?Prehist. Ann. Scat.")
The origin of the name ?Edinburgh? has proved
the subject of much discussion. The prenomen
is a very common one in Scotland, and is always
descriptive of the same kind of site-a doye.
Near Lochearnhead is the shoulder of a hill called
Edin-achip, ?? the slope of the repulse,? having
reference to some encounter with the Romans; and
Edin-ample is said to mean ?the slope of the
retreat.? There are upwards of twenty places
having the same descriptive prefix j and besides the
instances just noted, the following examples may
also be cited :-Edincoillie, a ?? slope in the wood,?
in Morayshire ; Edinmore and Edinbeg, in Bute ;
Edindonach, in Argyllshire ; and Edinglassie, in
Aberdeenshire. Nearly every historian of Edinburgh
has had a theory on the subject. Arnot
suggests that the name is derived from Dunea?in,
?the face of a hill ; I? but this would rather signify
the fort of Edin; and that name it bears in
the register of the Priory of St Andrews, in 1107.
Others are fond of asserting that the name was
given to the town or castle by Edwin, a Saxon
prince of the seventh century, who ?repaired
it;? consequently it must have had some name
before his time, and the present form may be a
species of corruption of it, like that of Dryburgh,
from Durrach-brush, ?the bank of the grove
of oaks.?
Another theory, one greatly favoured by Sir
Walter Scott, is that it was the Dinas Eiddyn (the
slaughter of whose people in the sixth century is
lamented by Aneurin, a bard of the Ottadeni); a
place, however, which. Chalmers supposes to be
elsewhere. The subject is a curious one, and ... Thus we see in the terraced slopes illustrations of a mode of agriculture pertaining to times before ...

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tunate creature were chained in '{the good old may be imagined.
times " romancists write so glibly of. The origin
of all these vaults is lost in antiquity.
There prisoners have made many desperate, but
in the end always futile, attempts to escape-particularly
in 1761 and in 1811. On the former
occasion one was dashed to pieces ; on the latter,
a captain and forty-nine men got out of the fortress
in the night, by cutting a hole in the bottom of
the parapet, below the place commonly called the
Devil's Elbow, and letting themselves down by a
Tope, and more would have got out had not the
nearest sentinel fired his musket. One fell and
was killed zoo feet below. The rest were all
re-captured on the Glasgow Road.
In the Grand Parade an octagon tower of considerable
height gives access to the strongly vaulted
crown room, in whicb the Scottish regalia are
shown, and wherein they were so long hidden
from the nation, that they were generally believed
to have been secretly removed to England and
destroyed; and the mysterious room, which was
never opened, became a source of wonder to the
soldiers, and of superstition to many a Highland
sentinel when pacingon his lonely post at night.
On the 5th of November, 1794, in prosecuting
a search for some lost Parliamentary records,
the crown-room was opened by the Lieutenant-
Governor and other commissioners. It was dark,
being then w.indowless, and filled with foul air. In
the grated chimney lay the ashes of the last fire
and a cannon ball, which still lies where it had
fallen in some past siege ; the dust of eighty-seven
years lay on the paved floor, and the place looked
grim and desolate. Major Drummond repeatedly
shook the oak chest; it returned no sound, was
supposed to be empty, and stronger in the hearts
of the Scots waxed the belief that the Government,
" It was with feelings of no common anxiety that
the commissioners, having read their warrant, proceeded
to the crown-room, and, having found a11
there in the state in which it had been left in 1794,
commanded the king's smith, who was in attendance,
to force open the great chest, the keys of which had
been sought for in vain. The general impression
that the regalia had been secretly removed weighed
heavily on the hearts of all while the labour proceeded.
The chest seemed to return a hollow and
empty sound to the strokes of the hammer; and
even those whose expectations had been most
sanguine felt at the moment the probability of bitter
disappointment, and could not but be sensible that,
should the result of the search cmfirnl those forebodings,
it would only serve to show that a national
affront-an injury had been sustained, for which it
might be ditficult, or rather impossible, to obtain
redress. The joy was therefore extreme when, the
ponderous lid of the chest having been forced open,
at the expense of some time and labour, the regalia
were discovered lying at the bottom covered with
linen cloths, exactly as they had been left in 1707,
being I 10 years before, since they had been surrendered
by William the ninth Earl Marischal to the
custody of the Earl of Glasgow, Treasurer-Deputy
of Scotland. The reliques were passed from hand
to hand, and greeted with the affectionate reverence
which emblems so venerable, restored to public
view after the slumber of more than a hundred
years, were so peculiarly calculated to excite. The
discovery was instantly communicated to the public
by the display of the royal standard, and was
greeted hy the shouts of the soldiers in garrison,
and a vast multitude assembled on the Castle hill ;
indeed the rejoicing was so general and sincere as
plainly to show that, however altered in other
in wicked policy, had destroyed its contents j but ' respects, the people of Scotland had lost norhing of
murmurs arose from time to time, as the years went that national enthusiasm which formerly had dison,
and a crown, called that of Scotland, was ac- played itself in grief for the loss of those emblematic
honours, and now was expressed in joy for their I tually shown in the Tower of London !
of Cardinal York, the Prince Regent, afterwards I Covered with glass and secured in a strong iron, ... creature were chained in '{the good old may be imagined. times " romancists write so glibly of. The ...

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lies directly at the south-eastern base of Arthur's
Seat, and has long'been one of the daily postal
districts of the city.
Overhung by the green slopes and grey rocks ok
Arthur's Seat, and shut out by its mountainous
mass from every view of the crowded city at its
further base in Duddingston, says a statist, writing
in 1851, a spectator feels himself sequestered from
the busy scenes which he knows to' be in his
immediate vicinity, as he hears their distant hum
upon the passing breezes by the Willow Brae on
the east, or the gorge of the Windy Goule on the
south; and he looks southward and west over a
glorious panorama of beautiful villas, towering ,
'
From the style of the church and the structure of
its arches, it is supposed to date from the epoch of
the introduction of Saxon architecture. A semicircular
arch of great beauty divides the choir from
the chancel, and a Saxon doorway, with fantastic
heads and zig-zag mbuldings, still remains in the
southern face of the tower. The entrance-gate to
its deep, grassy, and sequestered little buryingground,
is still furnished with the antique chain and
collar of durance, the terror of evildoers, named
the jougs, and a time-worn Zouping-on-stone, for the
use of old or obese horsemen.
Some interesting tombs are to be found in the
burying-ground ; among these are the marble obelisk
castles, rich coppice,
hill and valley, magnificent
in semi-tint, in
light and shadow, till
the Pentlands, or the
1 on e 1 y Lam m er m u i r
ranges, close the distance.
The name of this
hamlet and parish has
been a vexed subject
amongst antiquaries,
but as a surname it is
not unknown in Scotland
: thus, among the
missing charters of
Robert Bruce, there is
one to John Dudingstoun
of the lands of
Pitcorthie, in Fife; and
among the gentlemen
GATEWAY OF DUDDINGSTON CHURCH, SHOWING TIIE
JOUCS AND LOUPING-ON-STONE.
slain at Flodden in I 5 I 3
there was Stephen Duddingston of Kildinington,
also in Fife. Besides, there is another place of the
same name in Linlithgowshire, the patrimony of the
Dundases.
The ancient church, with a square tower at its
western end, occupies a green and rocky peninsula
that juts into the clear and calm blue loch. It is
an edifice of great antiquity, and belonged of old
to the Tyronensian Monks of Kelso, who possessed
it, together with the lands of Eastern and Western
Duddingston ; the chartulary of that abbey does not
say from whom they acquired these possessions, but
most probably it was from David I.
Herbert, first abbot of Kelso, a man of great
learning and talent, chamberiain of the kingdom
under Alexander I. and David I., in 1128, granted
the lands of Eastern and Western Duddingston to
Reginald de Bosco for an annual rent of ten marks,
to be paid by him and his heirs for ever.
erected to the memory
of Patrick Haldane of
Gleneagles by his unfortunate
grandson, whose
fate is also recorded
thereon; and that of
James Browne, LLD.,
Advocate, the historian
of the Highlands and
Highland clans, in the
tower of the church.
In the register of
assignations for the
minister's stipends in
the year 1574, presented
in MS. by
Bishop Keith to the
Advocates' Library,
Duddingston is said to
have been a joint dependence
with the
Castle of Edinburgh
upon the Abbey of Holyrood. The old records
of the Kirk Session are only of the year 1631, and
in the preceding year the lands of Prestonfield
were disjoined from the kirk and parish of St.
Cuthbert, and annexed to those of Duddingston.
On the r8th'of May, 1631, an aisle was added
to the church for the use of the Laird of Prestonfield,
his tenants and servants.
David Malcolme, minister here before I 741,
was an eminent linguist in his time, whose writings
were commended by Pinkerton, and quoted with
respect by Gebelin in his Monde Plillit$ and
Bullet in his Mkmoirrs Celtiques; but the church is
chiefly famous for the incumbency of the Rev. John
Thomson, a highly distinguished landscape painter,
who from his early boyhood exhibited a strong
predilection for art, and after being a pupil of
Alexander Nasmyth, became an honorary member
of the Royal Scottish Academy. He became ... directly at the south-eastern base of Arthur's Seat, and has long'been one of the daily postal districts of ...

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CONTENTS. V
CHAPTER XV.
T H E CALTON H I L L .
e .
?AGS
Origin of the Name-Ghbet and Battery them-The Quarry Holes-The Monastery of Greenside Built-The Leper Hospita-The
Tournament Ground and Playfield-Church of Greenside-Burgh of Calton-Rev. Rowlaod Hill-Regent Bridge Built-Obscmtorp
and Asmnomical Insiituticu-Bridewell Built-Hume's TombThe Political Martyrs' Monument-The Jews' Pka of Burial-
Monument of Nelson-National Monument, and those of Stewart. Playfair, and Bums-Thc High School-Foundarion hid- . Architeke and Extent-The 0pening-lnstruct;on-Rec~n of the New SchooCLintel of the Old School-Lard Brougham's
Opinion of the Institution. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I M
CHAPTER XVI.
THE NEW TOWN.
The Site before the Streets-The Lang Dykes-Wood's Farm-Dmmsheugh House-Bearfd's ParkgTbe Honsg of Easter and Wester
Coates--Gabriel's Road4hig.s Plan of the New Town-John Young builds the Fint House Therein-Extensionof the Town Weatward I I4
CHAPTER XVII.
P R I N C E S STREET,
A Glance at Society-Change of Manners, &c-The Irish Giants-Poole's Coffee-house-Shop of Constable & Co.-Weir's Museum, 1%-
The Grand Duke Nicholas-North British Insurance Life Association-Old Tar Office and New Club-Craig of Riccarton-" The
White Rose of Scotland "-St. John's Chapd-Its Tower and Vaults, &,.-The Smtt Monument and its Muscum-The Statues OP
Professor Wilrion, Allan Ramsay, Adam Bkk, Sir Jam- Sipson, and Dr. Livingstone-The General Improvements in Princes Street C 19
CHAPTER XVIII.
THE CHURCH OF ST. CUTHBERT,
History and Antiquity-Old Views of it Described-First Protestant Incumbents-The Old Manse-Old Communion Cups-Pillaged by
Cmmwell-Ruined by the Siege of 1689, and again in 17qs-Deaths of Messls McVicar and Pitcairn-Early Bdy-suatcheni-Demolition
of the Old Church-Erection of the New- of Heart-burial4ld Tombs and Vaults-The Nisbets of Dean-The Old Poor
House-Kirkbraehead Road--Lothian Road-Dr. Candish's Church-Military Academy-New Caledonian Railway Station. . . 13r
CHAPTER XIX.
GEORGE, S T R E E T .
Major Andrew Fraser-The Father of Miss F e r r i a 4 r a n t of Kilgraston-William Blackwad a d hh Magazine-The Mcdher ol 6 i
Walter Scott-Sir John Hay, Banker-Colquhoun of Killermont-Mn. Mumy of Henderland-The Houw of Sir J. W. Gardon.
Sir James Hall. and Sir John Sinclair of Ulbster-St. Andrew's Church-Scene of the Disruption-Physicians' HalLGlaoce at the
History of the College of Physicians--Sold and Removed-The Commercial Bank-Its Constitution-Assemhly Rooms-Rules of
17+Banquet to Black Watch-"The Author of ' Waverley"'-The Music Hall-"he New Union Bank-Its Formation, &c.-The
Masonic Hall-Watson's Picture of B-Statues of George IV., Pith and C6almer$ . . . . . . . . . . J39
CHAPTER XX.
QUEEN STREET.
The Philosophical Institution-House of Baron &de-New Physickd Hall-Sir James Y. Simpsoo, M.D.-'l%e ITomse of Profcsor
Wilsn-Si John Leslie--Lord Rockville-Si James Grant of Gm-The Hopetoun Roo~m-Edinburgh Educational Inrticucim
forLadies. . , . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .I51
CHAPTER XXI.
THE STREETS CROSSING GEORGE STREET, AND THOSE PARALLEL WITH IT.
Row Street-Miss Bums and Bailie Creech-Sir Egerton high-Robert Pollok-Thiitle Street-The Dispmsav-Hd Street--Coont
d'Alhy-St Andrew Street-Hugo Amot-David, Earl of Buchan-St. David Street-Dad Hume-Sii Waltcr Scott and Basil
Hall-Hanover Street-Sir J. Gnham Dalyell-Offics of Associatim for the Impmmmt of the Poor--FrsdeticL Street--Gnnt d
Corrimony-Castle Street-A Dinner with Si Walter h a - S h o e of Rubiw-Mwey Napier4h.de Street and Charlotte Street . 158 ... V CHAPTER XV. T H E CALTON H I L L . e . ?AGS Origin of the Name-Ghbet and Battery them-The Quarry ...

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140 OLD AND NEW EDINBURGH. [St. Giles's Church.
establishment, and Maitland gives us a roll of the
forty chaplaincies and altarages therein.
An Act of Council dated twelve years before
this event commemorates the gratitude ,of the
citizens to one who had brought from France a
relic of St. Giles, and, modernised, it runs thus :-
*' Be it kenned to all men by these present letters,
we, the provost, bailies, counselle and communitie
of the burgh of Edynburgh, to be bound
and obliged to William Prestoune of Gourton, son
and heir to somewhile iVilliam Prestoune of Gourton,
and to the friends and sirname
of them, that for so much
that William Prestoune the
father, whom God assoile, made
diligent labour, by a high and
mighty prince, the King of
France (Charles VII.), and
many other lords of France, for
getting the arm-bone of St. Gile,
the which bone he freely left to
our mother kirk of St. Gile of
Edinburgh, without making any
condition. We, considering the
great labour and costs that he
made for getting thereof, promise
that within six or seven years,
in all the possible and goodly
haste we may, that we shall
build an aisle forth from our
Ladye aisle, where the said William
lies, the said aisle to be
begun within a year, in which
aisle there shall be brass for his
lair in bost (it., for his grave in
embossed) work, and above the
brass a writ, specifying the
bringing of that Rylik by him
into Scotland, with his arms, and
his arms to be put in hewn
church of his name in the Scottish quarter of
Bruges, and on the 1st of September is yearly
borne through the streets, preceded by all thedrums
in the garrison.
To this hour the arms of Preston still remain in
the roof of the aisle, as executed by the engagement
in the charter quoted; and the Prestons
continued annually to exercise their right of bearing
the arm of the patron saint of the city until
the eventful year 1558, when the clergy issued
forth for the last time in solemn procession on
the day of his feast, the 1st
SEAL OF ST. G1LES.t (A ffw Henry Lain&.
work, in three other parts of the aisle, with book
and chalice and all other furniture belonging
thereto. Also, that we shall assign the chaplain
of whilome Sir William of Prestoune, to sing at the
altar from that time forth. . . . . Item, that
as often as the said Rylik is borne in the year,
that the sirname and nearest of blood of the said
William shall bear the said Rylik, before all
others, &c. In witness of which things we have
set to our common seal at Edinburgh the 11th
day of the month of January, in the year of our
Lord 1454"*
The other arm of St. Giles is preserved in the
Frag. : " Scotomomastica."
September, bearing with them
a statue of St. Giles-"a marmouset
idol," Knox calls itborrowed
from the Grey Friars,
because the great image of the
saint, which was as large as life,
had been stolen from its place,
and after being '' drouned " in
the North Loch as an encourager
of idolatry, was burned
as a heretic by some earnest
Reformers. Only two years
before this event the Dean of
Guild had paid 6s. for painting
the image, and Izd. for
polishing the silver arm containing
the relic. To give dignity
to this last procession the
queen regent attended it in
person; but the moment she
left it the spirit of the mob
broke forth. Some pressed close.
to the image, as if to join in
its support, while endeavouring
to shake it down; but this.
proved impossible, so firmly was
it secured to its supporters; and
the struggle, rivalry, and triumph
of the mob were delightful -to Knox, who described
the event with the inevitable glee in which
he indulged on such occasions.
Only four years after all this the saint's silverwork,
ring and jewels, and all the rich vestments,
wherewith his image and his arm-bone were wont
to be decorated on high festivals, were sold by
the authority of the magistrates, and the proceeds
employed in the repair of the church.
f Under a canopy supported by spiral columns a full-length figure of.
St. Giles with the nimbus, holding the crozier in his right hand, and ih
his left a Look and a branch. A kid, the usual attendant on St. Giles,
is playfully leaping up to his hand. On the pedestal is a shield bearing
the castle triple-towered, S. COMMUNE CAPTI BTI EGIDII DEEDINBURGH.
(Apfindrd to a chartrr by the Provost [ Waite, FodesJ d Chuptrr
of St. Gdes of fke man= andgkk in favmrof the magisfrates and'
conzmndy of Edindrryh, A.D. 1496.") ... OLD AND NEW EDINBURGH. [St. Giles's Church. establishment, and Maitland gives us a roll of the forty ...

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[Cramond.
---
OLD AND NEW EDINBURGH.
- -- 314
has been erected by the duke near it, at the foot of
the Granton Road, and on the opposite side of the
way are the Custom-house and other edifices, the
nucleus of an expanding seaport and suburb.
The stone used in the construction of' the pier
was chiefly quamed from the duke's adjacent property,
and the engineers were Messrs. Walker and
Burgess of London. The length of the pier is
'1,700 feet, and its breadth is from 80 to 160 feet.
Four pairs of jetties, each running out go feet, were
designed to go off at intervals of 350 feet, and two
slips, each 325 feet long, to facilitate the shipping
and loading of cattle.
A strong high wall, with a succession of thoroughfares,
runs along the centre of the entire esplanade.
A light-house rises at its extreme point, and displays
a brilliant red light. All these works exhibit such
massive and beautiful masonry, and realise their
object so fully, that every patriotic beholder must
regard them in the light of a great national benefit.
The depth of the water at spring tides is twentynine
feet. By the 7th William IV., c. 15, the Duke
of Buccleuch is entitled to levy certain dues on
passengers, horses, and carriages.
Eastward of this lies a noble breakwater more
than 3,000 feet in length; westward of it lies
another, also more than 3,000 feet in length, forming
two magnificent pools-one 1,000 feet in
breadth, and the other averaging 2,500.
At the west pier, or breakwater, are the steam
cranes, and the patent slip which was constructed
in the year 1852 ; since that time a number of
vessels have been built at Granton, where the first
craft was launched in January, 1853, and a
considerable trade in the repair of ships of all
kinds, but chiefly steamers of great size, has been
carried on.
Through the efforts of the Duke of Buccleuch
and Sir John Gladstone a ferry service was established
between the new piers of Granton and
Burntisland, and they retained it until it was taken
over by the Edinburgh and Northern, afterwards
called the Edinburgh, Perth, and Dundee Railway
Company, which was eventually merged in the
North British Railway.
Westward of the west pier lie some submerged
masses, known as the General's Rocks, and near
them one named the Chestnut.
CHAPTER XXXVII.
THE ENVIRONS OF EDINBURGH.
Cmmond-Origin oh the Name-Cramond of that Ilk-Ancient Charters-Inchmickery-Lord Cramand-Barnton-Gogar and its Propfieto-
Saughton Hall-Riccarton.
WITHIN a radius of about five miles from the
Castle are portions of the parishes of Cramond,
Liberton, Newton, Lasswade, Colinton, and 'Duddingstone,
and in these portions are many places
of great historical and pictorial interest, at which
our remaining space will permit us only to glance.
Two miles and a half westward of Granton lies
Cramond, embosomed among fine wood, where the
river Almond, which chiefly belongs to Edinburghshire,
though it rises in the Muir of Shotts, falls
into the Firth of Forth, forming a small estuary
navigable by boats fo; nearly a mile.
Its name is said to be derived from cmr, a fort,
and avon, a river, and it is supposed to have been,
from a disinterred inscription, the Alaterva of the
Romans, who had a station here-the Alauna of
Ptolemy. Imperid medals, coins, altars, pavements,
have been found here in remarkable
quadtities; and a bronze strigil, among them, is
now preserved in the Museum of Antiquities. On
the eastern bank of the river there lay a Roman
mole, where doubtless galleys were moored when
the water was deeper. Inscriptions have proved
that Cramond was the quarters of the 11. and
XX. Legions, under Lolliiis LJrbicus, when forming
the Roman rampart and militaryroad in the second
century-relics of the temporary dominion of Rome
in the South Lowlands.
According to Boece and 'Sir John Skene, Constantine
IV., who reigned in 994, was slain here
in battle by Malcolm lI., in 1002, and his army
defeated, chiefly through the wind driving the sand
into the eyes of his troops.
In after years, Cramond-or one-half thereofbelonged
ecclesiastically to the Bishops of Dunkeld,
to whom Robert Avenel transferred it, and here
they occasionally resided. There was a family
named Cramond of that ilk, a son of which became
a monk in the Carmelite monastery founded
at Queensferry early in the fourteenth century by
Dundas of that ilk, and who died Patriarch of
Antioch. ... AND NEW EDINBURGH. - -- 314 has been erected by the duke near it, at the foot of the Granton ...

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16171,782 283, 335, 343 343
III, 140; dew of, II. 169
vanous buildings in, 11. 172; it!
early residents, 11. 166
St. Andrew Street 11. I 160, 161
St. Andrew's Stree;, LeitcIII. 226
m71228 234
St. Ann, the tailors' patron saint, I.
23
St. Rnne-s altar Holyrood 11. 58
in St. Giles'sbhurch I1.'266
St. Anne's altar, St.' Cuthbert'r
Church, 111. 94
St. Anne's Yard, 11. 76,79,3~3,3q
St. Anthony's Chapel Arthur s Seat,
I. 3 6 ; ruinsof, li. *3m *321
St. Anthony's Fire, or &ipelas,
111. 215 216
St. Anthoiy's Hermitage, I. m, 11.
303, 19, 111. 216
St. Ant%ony's Port, Leith, 111.151
SI. Anthonys preceptory, Leith,
its seal,
St. Anthonir Street, Leith, 111.
St. Anthony's Well, 11. 312, 319,
St. Anthony's Wynd,Ldth,III.z~s
St. Augustine Chapel of 11.53
St. Augustine4 Church i. zgz.zg4
St. Bennet's, Greenhill,' 111. 54
SL Bernard's Chapel, 111.75
St. Bernard's Church, 111. 75
St. Bernard's Crescent, 111. 71. p,
St. Bernard's parish, 11. 92, 135,
St. Bernard's Row, 111. 94, 97
St. Bernard's Well, III.74,75. *76,
178, 17% 2yi, ~2
111. 131, 175, 176, 215
111. '216 217 298
"178 V a
322
73, 79,81
111.77
78
58,251. !II. 49
0s LI. #5
St. Catharine's altar, Holymod, 11.
St. Cathenne of Sienna, Convenl
St. Cecilii hall, I. 151, *a5z, II.
St. Christopher's altar, St. Giles's
St. Clair Lord 1. 16g
St. Clai;of St.'Clair, General, 111.
175
Church, 11. 264, 111. a
n z
St. Clair of Roslin William, 11.
354 (sec sinclair dar~ William)
St. colme Street '11. 105
St. Columba's Ekcooal Church. I. . *
9 5 .
Church, 11. 6 3 , 264
St. Crispin's altar, St. Giles's
St. Cuthbert, Bishop of Durham,
11. 13r
295
St. Cuthben's chapel of ease, 11.
St. Cuthben's Church. Pkatc I. I.
incumbents, 11. 131;. the old
manse, 11. 132 ;demolition of the
old church, 11. 134, 136 ; erection
of the new building, 11. 134 ; the
old and new churches, 11. 131
'133, * 136, * 137 ; burials unde:
thesteeple 11. 135; theoldpoorhouse,
11.'135, 111. 83
St. Cuthbert's Free Church, 11.225
St. Cuthbert's Lane, 11. 335
St. David Street, 11. 16r, '65
St. David's Church, 11. ar6
St. Eligius, patron of the hammermen,
11.962
St. Eloi, 11. 263: carved groin
stone from Chapel of, St. Giles's
Church, I. * 147, 11. 262
St. Eloi's eo-. 11. 262
St. George's 'Church: Charlotte
St. Georie's Episco$l chapel, 11.
Square 11. 115, 126 173, 175
'90
St. Geor e's Free Church, 11. 138,
St. George's Well 111. 75
St. Giles, the pation saint of Edinburgh,
I. 138, 141, 254: seal of,
I. * 140 ; procgsiou of the saint's
relics I. 140
St. GilehChurch, 1. *I, 42,47, so,
51, 52.55, ~ 6 7 8 ~ 9 4 , IV. xm, Iax,
123, 138-147, 152, 18% 186, rga,
11. 15, 957 234, 3167 37% 111. 31,
z10,115. 75
GENERAL INDEX.
51, 173, 184; its early history
I. 138 139; the Norman door
way, i. 139, 141' the Preston
relic, I. 140; Sir DAvid Lindesaj
on the rocessionists, I. 141,
chapel ofsobert Duke of Albany:
I. 142; funeral of the Regent
Murray, I. 143; the "gude
Regent's aisle," rb. ; the Assem.
blyaisle, I. 144; disputes between
am- VI. and the Church party, I. 144,146'departureofJamesVI.
I. 146 ; Haddo's hole, ib. ; thi
Napier tomb, id. ; the spire and
lantern, I. '144, 146; theclock
and bells, I. 146 ; the Krames, I.
147 ; restorations of 1878 ib. ;
the or an, ib. ; plan of St. kiles's
Churcf I. *1452 the High
Church' 1. *I 8 149; removal
of hone;: from f f. 384
3t. Giles's Chdchyard, I. 148, 149,
157 11. 379
31. Ghes's Grange, 111. 47, 49, 52,
54 ;, its vicar, 111. 49
3t. Giles's Kirkyard, 11. 239
3t. GilesStreethow PrincaStreet).
I. 286 11. 11;
3t. Gd&s Street, Leith, 111. 223,
226 234
3t. Jimes's chapel, Newhaven, 111.
216, 295, 298, p; remains of,
3t. James'schapel,Leith, III.*240,
111. 297
243
3t. ams'sOpw=opalchapel 11.184
jt.jame~'sEp~opalChurcd,Leith,
111. *241, 243
3t. James's Square, I. 366. 11. 176, . _ _ . .~
19.
3t, lohn the Baotist's Chaoel. 111. . . si, 53
St. John's altar, St. Giles's Church,
II.26?,65
3t.John sCatholicChapel, Brighton
St. Johks chapel, Burghmuir, 111.
Place 111. 147
126, 134, d, 338, 383
3t. John's Established Church, I.
291
Leith 111. *n44
jt. John's Established Church,
jt. Johr;'s Free Church I. z 5, 314
Zt. John's Free Church,'Leiti, 111.
j t T p Hill I. 82
It. ohn's Stdet, 1. 325, 11. 2, 9,
jt. Katherine of Scienna, Convent
2, 53, 329 ; ruins of,
jt. Kathanne's altar, Kmk-of-Field,
jt. Katharine's altar, St. Margaret's
It. Katherine's chapel, Currie, 111.
jt. Katherine's estate, 111. 330
it. Katharine's Place, 111. 54
it. Katharine's Thorn, 11. 363,
it. Katherine's Well, Liberton, 111.
25, 26 27, 31, 111. 63
of 111. 51
IiI. *S4 ; 12 history, ib. ; seal of,
111. *55.
111. I
chapel, Libaton, 111. 53
332
111.54
328, 3291 330
chapel of I 383, 384
it. Leonard, Suburb of, I. 382;
it. Leonard's 'craigs, I. 75, III. 27,
142
it. Leonard's Hill, I. 55, 384, 11.
34 ; combat near, I. 383
it. Leonard's, Leith, 111. 227
it. Leonard's Kirkyard, 11.379
it. Leonards Loan, I. 383
it. Leonard's Well, 111. 89
it. Leonard's Wynd, 11. 54
it. Luke's Free Church, II.r53,.r55
it. Magdalene's Chapel, I. 240
it. Margaret, I. 16, 18, I
it. Margaxet's Chapel, adinburgh
Castle, I. 19, *zo, 76; chancel
arch of I. *24
it. Margset'sconvent, III.45,'48
it. Margaret's Loch, 11. 319
it. Margaret's Tower, Edinburgh
it. Margaret's Well, Edinburgh
Cade. I. 36, 48, 78
Castle, I. 49
St. Margaret's Well, Restalrig, 11.
St. LIC~ chapel &nLtarian), II.
11, 313, 111. I2 131
214
St. Mark's Episcopal chapel, Port*
bello 111. 147 *153
St. M L j Magdhene chapel, New
Hailes 111. 149, 366
St. M& Magdalene's Chapel, 11.
258, 261, 26a *a64' mterior 11.
264 : tabled on the walls,' 11.
262 *268
St. MkMagdalene's Hospital, 11.
26r, 262
St. Mary's Cathedral 11. 116, 211;
exterior and interior, 11. *ZIZ,
'213
St. Mary'sChapel, Niddry's Wynd,
St. M&s Ckpel, broughton
Street, I. z6z
St. Mary's Church, South Leith,
111. 130, 135, 182, 196, *217,218,
* z ~ o 222 244 ; its early hatory,
I. 247 251, 298 11. 26
III.;I8 :19
St. Mary'; Convent I. 107,382
St. Mary's Free Ch$ch 11. 184
St. Mary's Hos ita1 I. :97
St. Mary's-in-t\e-$ield 11. '34
251, 252, III. 1 7 ; its history:
111. I, a
St. Mary's parish church, 11. 191 ;
school-house, 111. 87
St. Mary's Port, 1. 382
St. Mary's Roman Catholic chapel,
St. Maryi Street' I. p 11. 238
St. Mary'sWynd,' 1.38, A, 217,219,
274. 275 * 29.298,2 I 335,375
382, 11. ;3, 249.~84~1%. 6 ; door!
head in 1. *3m
St Matth:w'sWell, Roslio,III. 3 I
St. Michael's Church, Inveres?c,
St. Nicholas Church North Leith,
111. 168, 176, 187 :its demolition
by Monk, 111. 187 255
St. Nicholas Wyud, fII. 256
St. Ninian's altar, St. Giles's
Church, 111. 119
St. Ninian's Chapel, I. 364, 111.72
St. Ninian's Church, North Leith,
11. 47, 111. 167 *I# 251 aga;
pe,tv tyrann in, iii. 25;; its
ministers IIE 254, 2 5 5 ; now a
g r a n a r y , ' ~ ~ ~ . 254,255
St. Niuian's Churchyard 111. *256
Sc. Ninian's Free Churih, North
Leith, 111.255
Si. Ninian's Row, I. 366,II. 103,176
St. Patrick Square, 11. 339
St. Patrick Street, I. 366, 11. 346
St. Patricks Romao Catholic
Church, 1. 278, 11. 249
St.Paul's Chapel,CarmbWsClo,
I. 239 *a40
St. Pads Episcopal Chapel, I. 278
St. Paul's Episcopal Church, York
Place, 11.60,188,198,248
St. Paul's Wark, 11. 101
St. Peter'sChurch,RoxburghPlace,
11. '79' school 11. 326
111.149
11. 338
St. Peter's Close 11. 255
St. Peter'sEpiscdpal Church,II1.51
St. Peter's Pend, 11. 255
St. Roque, 111.47 ; legends of, 111.
46,47
St. Roque's Chapel, Rurghmuir,
111.47, ?g : ruins of, Ill. *48
St. Roque s Day 111. 47
St. Roque's KirI&rd, 11. 379
St. Salvator's altar, St. Giles's
St. Staphhs Church, 111. * 81,83,
St. Thomas's Epkopal Chapel, 11.
Church 111. 35
85
. . - .
St?homas's Church, Leith, 111.
St. Tkdudna, 111. r p ; Church of,
St. Vincen't strhet, III. 83
Stafford Street, 11. 211
Stage, The, in Edinburgh, I.
247 248 '253
III.rz8 130 '3'
352
Stagesoaches, Establiihment of,
11.15, 16,235,236; the Glasgow,
11.121
Stained-glass window P a r l i i e n t
House 1. 159 Plati6
stainh0u;e. La;d of, I. 1:9*
389
Stair, Earlof, I. p, 94,37 , 11. 38,
95, 167, 327, 348, 358, h. 3%
367
E.W~ Stair, I. 103,
Stair, Eliiheth Countess of 1. xrn
-106 17r, 111. 41 ; the "Iavic
mirrd "1.103; hermarriagewrth
Stamp duty, In0uence of the, on
newspapers, I. 284,285
Stamp Office, I. 234,267
Stamp Office Close, I. *ng, 231,
232 ; execution there, 1.2%
Standard Life Assurance Company,
11. '3
Stantied tragedy The I. 281
ztanley, Star and the Garter" acto:, 1. tavern ;30 I. 187
Steam communication iivd~eith to
Stedman Dr. John 11.301
Steele, sir Richard,,l: 106
Steil Pate, the musicin, I. 251
Stenkor Stenhouse, 111.339
Steveu Rev. Dr,, the historm of
the high School, 11.11 287, a88,
289, 291:296,35Sr 3&?11- 135
Stevenlaws Close 11.242
Stevenson, Dr. Ahibald, 11. 144
147
Stevenson, Duncan, and the Beacm
newspaper, I. 181, 182 11.241
Stevenson Dr. John I d 18 19~27
Stewart &hibald 'Lord Phvost,
I. 318, 322, 32;) 11. 280, 283;
house of I. 318 * 325
Stewart ojAllanbLk, Sir John, 11.
26
Stewart Sir Alexander, I. 195
Stewart' of Colmess, Sir J ~ C S ,
Provost, 11. 281,111. 340
Stewart, Sir ames, I. 1r7
stewart of &trees Sir Jmi-
I. 229, 111. 34-3;~ ; his h o d
in Advocate's Close, I. *223, Ill.
30' Sir Thomas ib.
Stewah Sir Lewis '111. 364
Stewariof Monk&, Sir Williim,
Murder of I. 196,258, 259, 74
Stewart of 'Grantully, Sir john,
Stewart of Grantully, Sir George,
11. 350; his marriage, 111.90
Stewart, Dugald, I. 106, 156, 11.
17, 39, 120, 168, 195, m~r 2 3,
111.20,55; gray of II. 29 ; his
father, 111.20 ; h e cife, 11. 206 :
her brother, 11. 207; Dugalds
monument 11. III
Stewart Jades 111.79
Stewart'of Gariies, Alexander, 11.
225
Stewart Belshes of Invermay, Sir
John, 11. 383.
Stewart, Daniel, 111. 67; hospital
of, id.; ne* from Drumsheugh
London, 111. 2x1
11. 97 117, 128,13 , 151,175, ZIO
Steel, si; John,scuiptor, I. 159,372.
11. 351
grounds, 111. *68
road, 'I. 3%
3 d
111.221
Stewart Robert, Abbot of Holy-
Stewart of Castle Stewart 11. 157
Stewart ofGarth, Genera;, 11. 150,
Stewart of Strathdon, Sir Robert,
Stewart Colonel ohn, 11. 350
stewart' hptain Eeorge, 11.257
Stewart: Lieut.Colone1 Matthew,
Stewart, Captain James, I. 195, I@
Stewart of W t r e e s , I. 6a
Stewart, Execution of Alexander,
Stewart Lady Margaret 111. n I
Stewart'of lsle Mn., 11.' 162
Stewart, Nichblson, the actor, I.
Stewartfield manor-how, 111. 88,
Stewart s Hospital, 11. 63, 111.67
Stewarth oysteehouse, i. I m
Stirling, Enrls "f T I ? E
Stirliig
stirling gi ~ e w a I. 44 42 11.223
stirliig: sir w&, Lord Rovost,
Stirling of Kek, Sir William, 11.
158 ; h e daughter, 111.35
Stirling, General Graham, I I. 153
Stirling, Mrs., actRsq I. 35f
11. d
a youth, 11. 231
343
91, * 93
11. ~ $ 2 283, 391
I. 374 ... 283, 335, 343 343 III, 140; dew of, II. 169 vanous buildings in, 11. 172; it! early residents, 11. ...

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north, and theottadeni, in imitation of their practice,
had adopted the cremation of their dead, yvhile
adhering to their ancient form of sepulchre. Similar
evidences of the occupation of the locality by
an ancient people have been found all round
Edinburgh.
The skeleton of a woman buried in the same
fashion, with head and feet together, was found on
the eastern slope of Arthur's Seat in 1858, and
within the cist lay the lid of a stone quern or
hand-mill. Of the same early period was, perhaps,
the cist which was found on the coast of the Firth,
when the Edinburgh and Granton Railway was
made, the skeleton in which had on it ornaments
formed of tlle common cockle-shell.
Some graves of a later and more civilised period
were found in 1850, when the immense reservoir
was excavated on the Castle Hill, on the highest
ground, and in the very heart of the ancient city.
On the removal of some buildings of the seventeenth
century, and after uprooting some portions
of the massive wall of 1450, lower down, at a
depth of twenty-five feet, and entirely below the
foundation of the latter, "the excavators came
upon a bed of clay, and beneath this was a thick
layer of moss, or decayed animal and vegetable
matter, in which was found a coin of the Emperor
Constantine, thus suggesting a date approximating
to the beginning of the fourth century. Immediately
under this were two coffins, each formed of
a solid trunk of oak, measuring about six feet in
length. They were rough, and unshapen externally,
as when hewn down in their native forest,
and appeared to have been split open ; but within
they were hollowed out with considerable care, a
circular space being formed for the head, and,
indeed, the interior of both had considerable
resemblance to what is usually seen in the stone
coffins of the twelfth and thirteenth centuries.
They lay nearly due east and west, with their
heads to the west. One of them contained a male
and the other a female skeleton, unaccompanied
by any weapons or other relics ; but between the two
coffins the skull and antlers of a gigantic deer were
found, and alongside of them a portion of another
horn, artificially cut, forming, most probably, the
head of the spear with which the old hunter armed
himself for the chase. The discovery of such
primitive relics in the very heart of a busy population,
and the theatre of not a few memorable
historical events, is even more calculated to
awaken our interest, by the striking contrast which
it presents, than when found beneath the low,
sepulchral mound, or exposed by the operations
of the agriculturist. An unsuccessful attempt was
made to remove one of the coffins. Even the
skulls were so much decayed that they went to
pieces on being lifted j but the skull and horns of
the deer found alongside of them are now deposited
in the Scottish Museum."*
Many relics and weapons of the bronze period
have been discovered in and around the site of
Edinburgh. Some of the most perfect and polished
of these weapons are now in the Museum at
Abbotsford; and about fifty pieces of swords,
spear-heads, and other fragments of weapons, all
more or less affected by fire, are in the collection
of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland, The
swords are of the leafshaped form, with perforated
handles, to which bone or wood has been attached,
and many of the large spear-heads are pierced with
a variety of ornamental designs.
During the construction, in 1846, of that part
of the Queen's Drive which lies directly abol-e
the loch, on the southern slope of Arthur's Seat,
two of the most beautiful and perfectly leafshaped
swords ever found in Scotland were discovered in
a bed of charcoal, and are now in the Scottish
Antiquarian Museum. The blade of the largest
measures 26a inches in length, and IQ inches at
the broadest part. Not fa; from the same place a
cup or lamp of clay and Celts of bronze were also
discovered, and, at '' Samson's Ribs," a cinerary urn.
On the green slopes of the same hill may be
seen still the traces of ancient civilisation, in some
now-forgotten mode of cultivating the soil-forgotten
unless we recall the terraces of the Rhine, or the
ancient parallels of the Peruvians in the Cordilleras
of the Andes. " On the summer evenings, while
the long shadows still linger on the eastern slope of
Arthur's Seat, it is seen to rise from the margin of
Duddhgston Loch to the higher valley in a succession
of terrace-steps, in some cases with indications
of retaining walls still discoverable. It is on the
slope thus furrowed with the traces of a long extinct
system of agriculture that the bronze swords
and Celts, and the ancient pottery already described,
have been dug up; while wrought deers' horns,
weapons, and masses of melted bronze, were
dredged from the neighbouring loch in such quantities
as to suggest that qt some remote age weapons
of the Scottish bronze period had been extensively
manufactured on the margin. Following up the
connection between such evidences of ancient art
and agriculture, Mr. Chambers suggests the probability
that the daisses of Arthur's Seat and the
bronze weapons dug up there qr dredged from the
loch are all works of the same ingenious handi-
" Rc-hisMric Annals of scotknd" ... and theottadeni, in imitation of their practice, had adopted the cremation of their dead, yvhile adhering ...

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THE ROYAL INFIRMARY. 299 h6rmary Street]
students to witness surgical operations. The Infirmary
has separate wards for male and female
patients, and a ward which is used as a Lock
hospital ; but even in ordinary periods the building
had become utterly incompetent for the service
of Edinburgh, and during the prevalence of an epidemic
afforded but a mere fraction of the required
accommodation, and hence the erection of its magnificent
successor, to which we shall refer elsewhere.
The Earl of Hopetoun, in 1742, and for the last
twenty-five years of his life, generously contributed
A400 per annum to the institution when it was
young and struggling. In 1750 Dr. Archibald Kerr
of Jamaica bequeathed to it an estate worth
E218 11s. 5d. yearly; and five years afterwards
the Treasury made it a gift of jG8,ooo j yet it has
never met with the support from Government. that
it ought to have done, and which similar institutions
in London receive.
But the institution owed most of its brilliant
success to Lord Provost Drummond. Among his
associates in this good work he had the honoured
members of the Colleges of Physicians and Surgeons
in Edinburgh, ever first in all works of goodness and
charity; and the first Dr. Munro, Professor of
Anatomy, was singularly sanguine of the complete
success of the undertaking.
That portion of the house which was founded by
the Earl of Cromarty was opened for the reception
of patients in December, 1741. The theatre described
was made to serve the purposes also of a
chapel, and twelve cells on the ground floor, for cases
of delirium fremens, being found unnecessary, were
converted into kitchens and larders, &c. The
grounds around the house, consisting of two acres,
and long bounded on- the south by the city wall,
were laid out into grass walks for the convalescents,
and ultimately the house was amply supplied with
water from the city reservoir.
In the years 1743-4 the sick soldiers of the
regiments quartered in the Castle were accommodated
in the Infirmary; and in the stormy
period of the '45 it was of necessity converted into
a great military hospital for the sick and wounded
troops of both armies engaged at Prestonpans and
elsewhere ; and in I 748 the surgeon-apothecaries,
who since 1729 had given all manner of medical
aid gratis, were feed for the first time. Wounded
from our armies in Flanders have been sent there
for treatment.
In 1748, after paying for the site, building,
furniture, &c., the stock of the institution amounted
to &5,00o; and sick patients not wishing to be resident
were invited to apply for advice on Mondays
and Fridays, and were in cases of necessity
admitted as supernumeraries at the rate of 6d. per
day. About this time there was handed over an
Invalid Grant made by Government to the city,
on consideration of sixty beds being retained for
the use of all soldiers who paid 4d. per diem for
accommodation, This sum, &3, 2 70, was fully made
over to the managers, who, for some time afteqfound
themselves called upon to entertain so many military
patients, that a guard had to be mounted on
the house to enforce order; and liberty was obtained
to deposit all dead patients in Lady Yester's
churchyard, on the opposite side of the street.
Hitherto the physicians had, with exemplary
fidelity, attended the patients in rotation j but in
January, 1751, the managers on being empowered
by the general court of contributors, selected Dr.
David Clerk and Dr, Colin Drummond, physicians
in ordinary, paying them the small honorarium of
;E30 annually.
The University made offer to continue its
services, together with those of the ordinary physicians,
which offer was gladly accepted; and
though the practice fell into disuse, they were long
continued in monthly rotation. To the option of
the two ordinary physicians was left the visiting
of the patients conjointly, or by each taking his
own department. "It was their duty to sign the
tickets of admission and dismission. In case of any
unforeseen occurrences or dangerous distemper, the
matron or clerks were permitted to use this authe
rity ; the physicians en their amval, however, were
expected to append their signatures to the tickets.
The good and economy of the house from the first,
induced the managers to appoint two of their
number to visit the institution once every month,
who were enjoined to inquire how far the patients
were contented with their treatment, and to note
what they found inconsistent with the ordinary
regulations : their remarks to be entered in a book
of reports, to come under review at the first meeting
of managers." (" Journal of Antiq.," VoL 11.)
In 1754 some abuses prevailed in the mode of
dispensing medicines to the out-door patients,
detrimental to the finances ; an order was given for
a more judicious and sparing distribution. In the
following pear application was made to the Town
Council, as well as to the Presbytery of the Church,
to raise money at their several churches to provide
a ward for sick servants-which had been found
one of the most useful in the house. From its
first institution the ministers of the city had, in
monthly rotation, conducted the religious services ;
but in the middle of 1756 the managers appointed
aregular chaplain, whose duty it was to preach
every Monday in the theatre for surgical operations. ... ROYAL INFIRMARY. 299 h6rmary Street] students to witness surgical operations. The Infirmary has separate ...

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GENERAL INDEX.
299, 307, 342 ; Lord Provost, 11.
282 283 293' hisfuneral I 155
Kindid, b a d , of Coates 'Hbuse
first constable of Edinbured
Castle, I. 79
Kincaid, John, of Craig House
111. 42; his ancestors and de!
scendantr ib.
Kincaids of Warriston, The, 11. 182,
Ki%$d 2nd 11. 282
Kincardine, Earl of, I. 101
Kincleven Lord 111. 221
King Ceo;ge's dstion, Leith Dock,
Kinghorn, Earl of, 11. 352
Kinghorn, 111. 211
Kinghorn-ness, 111. 294
King ames's Knowe, 111. 29
King dtreet Leith lII.176,178 227
Kiugeston k r John de I. a4 ;5
Kings, Ghery of the: Hol)rood
Kings of Sc*&yand Kneller's par.
King's Advocate. Privileges of the,
-
111. 283
Pal==, 11 4, 76, '77, 79
traits of the., I. <58
IE,243
Kings Body Guard for Scotland,
King's Bridge, The, I. 118, 195, 11.
11. 352
215,
Kings Company &Archers, 11.352
King's Cramand, 111. 3q, 317
King's Head Inn 11. 242
King's Park I. 4 4 11. 7, 310, 313,
915, 346; ;ombat)in the, 11. 306
King's Printing-office, I. 376
" Kingh Quhair," The, I. a7
King's Road, I. 295
King's stables, The, 11. 224, 225
Kine's Wark. Leith. 111. 216. 217. I . - . ".. 23, a45
Kingston, Viscount, 111. 30
Kingston Gmge, 111. 338
Kmleith, 111. 164
Kinloch, Lord, 11. 197
Kinloch Sir Alexander 111. 343
Kinloch' Sir David Id. 343 .
Kinloch: Pmvost 'sir Francs, I.
169, 254, 111. 94, 3432 344; his
son3 111 344
Kinlodh, Hkry, House of, 11. 18,
'9
Kinloch's Clm, I. 238, 11. 18
Kinnoul, Earls of, 1. 371, 372, 111.
108
Kintore, Earl of, 11. 86, 339
Kirkbraehead House 11. II;, 136.
138, *x4q 210; dew of Edmburgh
Castle from, 1. * 64
Kirkcudbriqht Lard I. 153
Kirkaldy, Sir jame< I. 50
Kirkaldyof Grange, Sir William I.
47,20+.259, 11. 181, 225, 111. ;9,
36 6r 134 247; his defence of
th6 C h e k. 47-49, 78,116 121
214, 218, ill. 5 ; becomei'pro:
vast, 11. 279 ; %is dgth, I. 151,
111. arg
Kirkgate, The, Leith, 111. 175, 186,
213-226, 235 293 279; King
James's Hospital m'the, 111.186,
217; ancient chapel in the, 111.
* z u , 214; view of the Kirkgate,
Ill. *213
Kirkheugh The, I. 181, 11. 243
Kirkland, il. 60
Kirkliston, I. 23
Kirk Loan, Tie, 11. 114, 131, 111.
id-of-Field, The, I. 263; 266, 11.
71 222, 23 224 '51r 254, 2841
I, I, 4, 7, 8, 23,
39, 59 ; its provosts, 111. a, 3, 7 ;
the provost's house 111. 3 6,
23 ; murder of Lord barnle;,fIl.
3- 23; rough sketch of the
Kirt-af.Field 111. * 5
Kirk-of-Field Pbrt, III.3,7: affray
In the 111. 7
Kirkaf-'Field Wynd, I. 195, 11.
254, 111. 2, 3
Kirkpatricks of Allisland 11. 217
Kirk Semion, Leith, Pet& tyranny
of the, 111. 254
Kirk Session of St. Cuthbert's, 11.
K7= 78
z& 3797 19;.
216
Kirk Style The old I. 240
Kirkyard, !The, Hoiyrood, I I. 69
Kitchen Tower The I. 36
Kneller, Sir Gohfrey: I. 158
KnightsHospitallersof St.Anthony,
Leith 11. 319
Knight; of St. John, I. 321, I1 52,
232 ; hall of the, I. 314
Knolles, Sir William, I. 300
Knox, John, 1. a, 6, 93, 140, 143,
150, 151, 2=2, 113, 214, 254,298,
11. 64, 66, 71, 74, 262, 286, 288,
111. 35, 1. 174 177 178 I79
181, 223 ; Es puliit iLSt. Ciles';
Church, I. '143, 150, 11. 8 .
his grave, I. '150, 158; txi
manse of I. 212; his study, I.
*=la ; hi; house, I. 276, Plntc 9 ;
portraitandautographof I. *z13;
effigy of, I. 214; his wives, ib. ;
his death 1. 215; his bedroom
and sitti;g-raam, I. *216 *217;
his interview with Queen'Mary,
11. 67 : painting representing his
dispensing the sacrament, 11.89;
bronze portrait of, 11. 127
Knox, John, minister of North
Leith, 111. 254
Krames, The, St. Giles's Church,
I. 124 747 166 219
Kyd Bhie 'oh; 11 242
KyAchin, dhe &d of, 111. 192
L
Ladies'Assembly Room,The,II. 325
Ladies' College 11. 158
Ladies Euthuhiasm of towards
PrinkCharles Edward: I. 327,330
Ladies' fashions 1.243-245; oyster
tavern partie; patronised by, I.
1IC
La-&s' Walk Leith 111. 171
Ladies' Well 'The <[I. 54
Ladv aisle. +he. St. Giles's Cathe-
223, 356
Lady Lovat's Land I. 255
Lady Stair'sClose, i. 1o2,106,'107.
258, 282, 11. 118
Lady Wynd, The, 11. 224,zmS
Laigh Council-house, The, I. 175,
the council-rwm, 1. 116, 123
Laighshops 111. 126
Laiug, Aleiander, architect, 11.
h?;, Alexander Gordon, 11. 120;
his father 11. 120
Laing, Dahd, bookseller, I. 375,
11. 192 254, 382, 111. 128 149
Laing dilliam bookseller 'I. 375
Lamhie Gptah I. 204 &S
Lamb's' Close, gt. Gilks Street,
Lammius Seal of Amauld, I. * 182
Lamond 6f Lamond ohn 11.173
b p Acre Corsto$ine,rII1.1i8
Lancashire,'Tom comedian, I.
Landseer, the painter, 11. 89
Lang Dykes 11. 114 182 213 269
h g Gate,'The, 1.' @,'249,' 324, :: Lang Sandy," Ii. 28
Lang Sandy Gordon '' 11.157
"Lang Sandy Wood,"II. 115 (see
Wood, Dr. Alexander)
Langtoft, the chronicler, 111.351
Lanier, Sir John, I. 64, 63
Lantern and tower Jt. Giles's
Church. I. IAA. 116
Leith, 111. 188
335, 364, 11. 1x4 176, 111. 135
356: the ancient church; 111. -- .
357,358, '961
Laud, Archbshop, I. 51
Lauder, Si Alexander, Provost,
L
Pro3
Laude
Lau e; Sir John (ste Fountainhall)
Lauder: Sir Thomas Dick, 11. 95.
"97 I![. 49
111. 49. 50; his works, 111. 5d
Lauder Provost George of 11.278
Lauder: Thomas, Bishop Af Dunkeld,
11. Z;I
Lauder, W i l l i , the player, 11.39
Lauder the brothers, painters, 11.
89 9: Ill. 83 84
Lauher iamily, +he, 111. 49, 54
Lauder Road 111. 54
Lauderdale. 6uke of. I. 4. 220.11.
11, 22, 28;, 315 316,11~.'15o;i29;
Duchess of IIi. 150, 355
Lauderdale, 'Earls of, I. 90, 182,
111. 149. 258, 265, 334, 365;
Countess of 11. 31
Laudersofth;Bass The, 111.5453
Laurie Gilbert iI.'2a2
1auri;Street k i t h 111. 244
Lauriston Mkrquis Af 111. 110
Lauristo; Lord 111. '111
Lauriston: I. 38: 11. 222, 223, 345,
Lauriston Castle, 111. 110, III, 112,
Lauriston Gardens, 11. 363
Lauriston House, 11. 356
355-3631 370,111. 27,156
113
Lauriston Lane, 11. 121, 362
Lauriston Park, 11. 362
Lauriston Place 11. 6a, 363
Law, the financh sciemer, 11. 39,
111.111 __.. ...
Law of Lauriston John 1.174
Law, William, ~o;d Pro&, 11. a84
Law Courts, Plan of the, 1. * 169
Lawers, Laird of, 111. 29
Lawnmarket, The, I. 79,g4-123,
'75, 253, ZQZ, 295, 310, 31% 313,
314, 366, 11. 82 95, 24a 284 111.
99, 366; fire 'in 1771,' I. '102 ;
views of the I. *104, *'os, *I&
Lawnmarket hub, The, 111. 124
Lawnmarket Gazettes. I. 121. 111. I -,
124
Lawrence, Sir Thomas, 11. 88, 91,
Lawrence, Lady, I. 282
Lawson, Lord Provost, 11. 284
Lawson, James, Knox's successor,
111.77
11. 288. 111. 8
Lawson ;f the Highriggs, Richard,
1.41. 11. 223; Pluvoat, 11. 279
Lawn, Rev. Parker, 111.230,231, ~~ 259,262, 342
Lawsous Mansion-houseof the. 11.
223
" Lay of the Iast Minstrel," The,
111. 145
Lea, Sir Richard, 11. 48, 56
Leannonth Lord Provost, 111. p
Leather &s, 11. 330
Leather trade, Edinburgh the seat
Lee, Principa1,tI. ag, III. 90,179
Lee the actor 11.23 24
Lefivre, Sir J:hn Sha;, 11.84,85,88
Leggat's Land, 111. 75
Leggett Alexander I l l . 82
Letgh i u n t 11. 14; 141
Leigh Sir damuel igerton, 11.159
Leith,'I. 42, 11. 43, *45, 55, 63, 66,
76, 101, 182, zi3, 234, 28% 307,
330, 3547 111. 357 36, 72, 959 132,
133. 1.34. 143. 146, 19, 151. 152 ;
historical survey of the town,
111. 1 6 4 1 ~ ~ ; its charters, Ill.
166 * its early history 111. 166-
198 its subjection td the Edinburgh
magistrates 166-184 :
burnt and pillaged b;theEnglish, 169, I 0, arrival of the French
171 ; tteiortifications, ib. ; arrivai
of the English fleet and army,
174; opening of the batten=,
176; failure of the great assault
177 ; the Queen Regent's death:
177, 178; relics of the siege,
178; the fortificationsdemolished,
16.; landing of Queen Mary
179 ; Leith mortFaged, ld. : Ediu!
burgh takes military passession
of it, ib. ; its history during the
time of James VI. 179-182 ; the
Gowrie conspiracy 182; the
Union Jack, ab . piracy in the
harbour, 183, 1s;'; Leith re-fortified
184. the Covenant signed
186 the 'Cramwellis in Leith:
187; newspapers first printed in
the citadel, 187 ; Tucker's report,
i6. ; the Covenanters transported,
189; English pirates banged,
190, 191; the city during ?he
insurrection of 1715, 191 ; Bngadier
Mackintosh, xg~, 192; the
Duke of Argyle, 192 ; landing of
the Hessian army in 1746, I*;
of the, 11. 26
Highland mutinies 196, 197;
Paul Jones, 1g6, 1'7; mcidents
towards the close 01 the last century,
198 ; the first Scottish MVY
199; old fighting +nvS 0:
Leith, 198-206. their brave exploits,
zos, 206 ;'history of Leith
during the present century, q-
ZIZ ; dexription of the tom and
its neghbourhacd, a13189 (ye
rYbsequont i:cmr concerning
p t h ) ; plan of Leith, 111. *176,
zo5,** 233 ; view of Leith, 1@3,
111. 177; arms of Leith, Ill.
'~b; view of Leith from the
Easter Road, 111. ' 185
Leith and Edinburgh people in the
first years of the nineteenth cen-
Leith and London smacks, and
packet-ships, Ill. 210, 211 ; mtrw
duction ofsteamers 111. a11
Leith, Appearance :f, during the
French war 111. 210
LeithBank ?he 111.154 *236,23Q
Leith, Chakber bf Commk- Ill.
tury, 111. q
245; 288
Leith Dock Commissioners. The. . . 116 283, 288
Leith Docks, 111. 1 8 n 8 . g ; revenues
of, 111.26 ; mew in, 111.
'a85
Leith harbour 111. 2-74 ; entrance
to, Ilk. * 270 ; itscrowded
condition, 111. 273; the signal
tower 111. * 9, *xg, 245, 079:
its apbrance In 1700 111. 173
in 1829 111. *zoo; &-fight in;
III.18;,184;casandwestpiers,
Pbtr 33
Leith High School, 111. 159
Leith Hospital 111.248
Leith ImprovekntScheme,III.z~
Leith Links, I. 330, 331, 11. 11,
309, 344 35% 354,359. 372, 111.
31, 36, 166, 171, 175, '771 '7%
182, 186, 192, 1% 198. 219, '43, drEi, I. 4;. 11. 176,223, 111.
fz68 290
'5'
Leith markets The 111.246
Leith Merchats' dub. 111. zzo Leith MilSIII* & ;, --I
Leith Newspapersir;, 11% 187, 236
LeitiPierand Harbour, 179% PLd# . . .
32
Leith Piers. 111. 208. 071 : the
188, 18% 194, 197,-198;207)22g; * 2 7 ~ ~ 280, 28r, 288, 302
Leith Sands, 111. 267770; executions
there, 111. 267 ; duel
fought there 111. 268; horsennng
there, '111. 268-270
Leith Science School, 111. 270
Leithstage, Travelling by the, 111.
15% 154
17 I 178
Leith Street, I. 364, 11. r q ,
Leiti sugar H O W company,
""e
174
111.
Terrace 111. 152
Leith Walk, 1: s, 87, 180, 11. 178,
III. 94 128, 150-163, 171, 201,
218, 234, 251, 169, 288;
amusements for children, 111.
IFA: exsutions there 111. =SA.
1 3 - ig tlng of the, 111. 152, 1%; its
.. , _... 155,156~~57; itsnunerygmunds,
111. 157 ; new of from Gayfield
Square. 111. *16;; the botanic
garden I. 263 111. g6
Leith Wilk pubk school, Ill. 159
Leith Wynd, I. 38, 195, m7, VI,
2% 294 9 7 9 8 -3% 336.
LeitdWyndPort, I. 43,63, 302
Leiths, The family of, 111. 164
Le Jay, Brian the Templar, 11. 51
Lekprevik, Rhert, the printer, I.
342 11. 17 18: Z& hI. 6,125. 151
215
L~MOX, Duke of, I. 195, 11.
Lennox, 3308 111. Duchess 335 of, I. 305
knnox, Earls of, 1. 4 5 154
186,25~1I. 17.63, 72, 111.
195,246,247, 297
Lennox Street, 111. 71 ... INDEX. 299, 307, 342 ; Lord Provost, 11. 282 283 293' hisfuneral I 155 Kindid, b a d , of Coates ...

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70 OLD AND NEW EDINBURGH. [The Water of Leith.
of Badajoz is extolled by Napier, and who died
fort major of Edinburgh Castle. On the opposite
side of the path, a modest stone marks the spot
where lies Captain John Grant, the last survivor
of the old Peninsula Gordon Highlanders, who
covered the retreat at Alba de Tormes, and was
the last officer to quit the town.
Near it is the grave of Captain Charles Gray of
the Royal Marines, the genial author of so many
Scottish songs ; and perhaps one of the most interesting
interments of recent years was that of Lieutenant
John Irving, R.N. (son of John Irving, W.S.,
the schoolfellow and intimate friend of Sir Walter
Scott), one of the officers of the ill-fated Franklin
expedition, who died in 1848 or 1849, and whose
remains were sent home by Lieutenant Sohwatka,
of the United States Navy, and laid in the Dean
Cemetery in January, 1881, after a grand naval and
military funeral, in accordance with his rank as
Lieutenant of the Royal Navy."
CHAPTER VII.
VALLEY OF THE WATER OF LEITH (continlced).
The Dean Bridge-Landslips at Stockbridge-Stone Coffins-Floods in the Leith-Population in 174a-St. Bemard's Estate-Ross's Tower
-I' Christopher North" in Anne Street-De Quincey there-%. Bernard's Well-Cave at Randolph Cliff-Veitch's Square-Chuiches in.
the Localit$-Sir Henry Raebm-Old Deanhiugh-House.
ABOUT a hundred yards west by north of Randolph
Crescent this deep valley is spanned by a stately
bridge, built in 1832, after designs by Telford.
This bridge was erected almost solely at the expense
of the Lord Provost Learmonth of Dean,
to form a direct communication with his property,
with a view to the future feuing of the latter.
It was when an excavation was made for its northern
pier that the Roman urn was found of which
an engraving will be seen on page 10 of the first
volume of this work. Over the bridge, the roadway
passes at the great height of 106 feet above the
rocky bed of the stream. The arches are four in
number, and each is ninety-six feet in span. The
total length is 447 feet, the breadth thirty-nine feet
between the parapets, from which a noble view of
the old Leith village, with its waterfall, is had to
the westward, while on the east the eye travels
along the valley to the distant spires of the seaport.
That portion of it adjoining Stockbridge is still
very beautiful and picturesque, but was far more
so in other days, when, instead of the plain back
Views of Moray Place and Ainslie Place, the steep
green bank was crowned by the stately trees of
Drumsheugh Park, and tangled brakes of bramble
and sweet-smelling hawthorn overhung the water
of the stream, which was then pure, and in some
places abounded with trout. Unconfined by stone
walls, 'the long extent of the mill-lade here was
then conveyed in great wooden ducts, raised upon
posts. These ducts were generally leaky, and
being patched and mended from time to time, and
covered with emerald-green moss and garlands of
creepers and water-plants, added to the rural
aspect of the glen. Between the bridge and the
mineral well, a great saugh tree, shown in one of;
Ewbank's views, overhung the lade and footpath,.
imparting fresh beauty to the landscape.
'' At Stockbridge," says the Edinburgh Advertiser
for 1823, '' we cannot but regret that the rage for
building is fast destroying the delightful scenery
between it and the neighbouring village of the:
Water of Leith, which had so long been a prominent
ornament in the envGons of our ancient
city."
At the southern end of the bridge, where
Randolph Cliff starts abruptly up, dangerous landslips
have more than once occurred ; one notably
so in March, 1881, when a mass of rock and earth
fell down, and completely choked up the lade which
drives the Greenland, Stockbridge, and Canonmills,
flour-mills.
At the north-westem end of the bridge is the
Trinity Episcopal Church, built in 1838, from a.
design by John Henderson, in the later English
style, with nave, aisles, and a square tower. To the
north-eastward an elegant suburb extends away
down the slope until it joins Stockbridge, comprising
crescents, terraces, and streets, built between
1850 and 1877.
The following is a detailed explanation of the woodcut on the
previous page :-I, View looking along the West Wall, showing, on the
right, the monument to Buchanan, founder of the Buchanan Institute,
Glasgow, and on the extreme left, the grave of Mr. Ritchie, of Tlu
Smlmruz (the pyramid at further end of walk is Lord Rutherford's
tomb, and Lord Cockbum's is near to it); z, Sir Archibald Alison's
gave (the larger of the Gothic mural tablets in white marble): 3,
Grave of George Combe ; 1, Monument to Alexander Russel, Editor
>f T/u Scoismm; 5, Tomb, on extreme left, of Lord Rutherford, next
to it that of Lord Jeffrey, the Runic Cross in the path is erected to.
Lieut. Irving of the Franklin Expedition; 6, Grave of Prof. W%on
:obelisk under tree), and of Prof. Aytoun (marble pedestal with crose
>U top). ... OLD AND NEW EDINBURGH. [The Water of Leith. of Badajoz is extolled by Napier, and who died fort major of ...

Vol. 5  p. 70 (Rel. 0.13)

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Vol. 6  p. 346 (Rel. 0.13)

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Vol. 6  p. 382 (Rel. 0.13)

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Vol. 6  p. 384 (Rel. 0.13)

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Vol. 6  p. 383 (Rel. 0.13)

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Vol. 1  p. 6 (Rel. 0.13)

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Vol. 4  p. 286 (Rel. 0.13)

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Vol. 4  p. 347 (Rel. 0.12)

GENERAL INDEX. 387
Rhind. David. architect. 11. 147
275, '2 6, I I t . 67 244 .
Rhmd, {anet, ToAb of, 11. 262
Riccarton, 111. 319; its loca
history, 111. 321
Riccarton House 111. 322
Richard 11. of E h a n d . 11. 2
Richardson, Messrs., tobacconists
Richardson, W.L.,theartist, 111.8:
Richmond Court 11. 338
Richmond Stree; 11. 188 333, 332
Riding School ?he 11. 1>8
Riding School'Lani, 11. 135
Riddell's Close, I. 110, 1rr,z82, ng:
Riddell's Land, I. 98, 110, 11. 9
Riddle Sir Jama 11. 187 194
Riddle's Close, Liith, 111: 226, 22(
Ri ht of sanctuary, Edinburgt
tastle deorived of the. I. 67
111. 34
, ,
Rillbank IiI. 55
Riots at ;he Cananmills, 111. 87
Risps, or ancient knockers, I. 94
237, 271, 11. 253
35'
Ristori, Madam, the actress, I
Ritchie, the sculptor, 11. 134, 147
336
Ritchie, hitch, 111. 79
Ritchie, Prof. Uavid 11. rg6
Ritchie. William. iditor of thq
Scoto;mm, I. 284
of the Scottish bank note: RE25 and 5s.. 11. 94
Rirzio, David, Murder of, I. 6, 50
92. 3173 11. 41, 58, 66,68, 70, 71
92; abude of. 11. 11,111. 361
Rivio Joseph 11. 68, 70,
Robe4 Abbot)of H~lyrood,~II. 3
Rober;[., 11. 307, 111. 35, 94, 166
Robert II., I. 26, 27. 142, 11. 3
Robeh III., I. 27, 11. 54,111. 317
Robert Bruce, I. 23,24,III. 199,34:
Robert Gourlays house, 1. 116
327,343, 348
323 338, 348.354. 362
331, 354, 355
278, 111. 32, 59, 118, 166, 315
*rao 123 &. David. the oainter. 11. 80 Robei
III. +, 83; his p;rents,lI~. 7;
78; his birthplace, 111. -77, 78
Robertson, Patrick, Lord, 11. 156
175, 191, 193, 19% zoo, 111. 126
240; Lockhart's description 0:
him, 11. I 3 ; Lockhart'sepitaph:
an him, I?. 194
Robertson, Dr., I. 101, 231, 236
271, 273, 11. 27, 194: tomb of
11. * 381. (See also the two fol
Iaving articles)
Robertson, Principal, 1. 106, 261
(See tkc $re.
11. 255, 281, 24% 293. 378, 379
111. 20, 22, 23,45.
ceding andfolrauing artider)
Robertson, the historian, 11. 168
his death, 111. 49; his materna
niece, Lord Brougham's mother
11. 168. (See the two precedizg
Robertson Memorial Estahlishec
Chutch, 111. 50
Robertson, Dr., the Leith historian
111. 167, 173, 218, 219, zzo, 222
226, zA, 229, 23r. 235, 236, 238.
239,245, 2471 249, 256, 259:
2697 2701 276
Robertson Mr I. 175
Robertsonlof zochart, George, I.
204 206
Robekson of Lude, Lieut.-General.
111. 34 ; his black Servant, ib.
Robertson, Geordie, 11. 3'6
Kcbertson, John, and the lepers,
11. I02
Robertson Mrs. Hannah reputed
grand-diughter of Chahes II.,
Robertson's Close, 11. 250, 251
Robertson's Land, I. 178
"Robin Hood,"Gameof, forbidden,
I . 116, 277 ; riot in wnsequence,
II.21,355
1. 126
"Robin Mend-the-Market," 111.
274
RobRoy, 111,9r; thesonsof,I.70;
popularity of the play of, I. 349,
350
Rob Roy's purse, 11. 87
Rohinson, Professor, 11. 86, 191
Rohinson's Land, I. 264
FWwn, the actor, I. 351
Rocheid of Inverleith, Sir James, I
Rocheid family The 111. 94
Rocheid of 1n;erleith James, 111.
95 ; his encounter d t h the Duke
of hlontaw, ib. ; his mother, ib.
111.94, 343
architect. 11. 184
5, 6
Rollinson, the comedian, I. 350
Rollo, Lord, I. 208
Rollock, Hercules, 11. 288, 289
Rullock of Pilton Peter 111. 307
Rollock Robert,' PrinApal of the
Univirsity, I1 -78,111.8,9,16,2
Roman CatholicJchapels attacked
by the mob, 11. 282
Roman Eagle Hall I. IrI
Romanism, BurleAue on 11. 289
Roman relics and coins i. 10
Roman road near Portdbello. I. 10. . . * I2
I. +I0
319
Roman urn foundnear DeanBridge,
Romieu, Paul, the clockmaker, I.
Rood Chapel, Broughton, 111. 151
Rose, Bishop Alexander, 11. 22,
Rosebery, Archibald Earl of, I.
Rosebery Earls of I. g 111. 106
Rosebery: Lord, IiI. :5, 3 5
Rosebery James Ear? of, ?I. 324:
singula; advertisement, ib.
Rosehaugh, the persecutor, 11. 331,
375
Rosehaughs Close I. 253 25
Rose Court, Georie Stree;, If. 1x8
Rosehill, DavidLord, 111. 30
ROM Street, 11. 146, 158, 159, 163,
Rose Street Lane, 11. 150
Rosebank Cemetery, 111. 89
Roseburn Howe 111. I-, 103,
*104; lintel at: III. *Io3; 111-
scriptions at, ib.
Roseburn Mqltings, 111. 102
Rosevale Place 111. 266
Roslin Castle, iII. 346, 3 , *348,
351 ; its early history, 141. 347-
s p ; the St. Clairs (Sinclairs),
111. 131
2572 11. 1042 109
96
say, D a d ) ' ;, Lords, I. 66, 11.326, 339,111.
362
Ross of Hawkhead, Lord, 111.260
Ross, John Earl of I. 247
ROSS David comedian, I. 341, 342
Koss: Walte:, the antiquary, I. 230,
Ross House 11. 338, 339
Ross Park iI. 338, 339
Rosslyn. Earls of, I. 271-273, 111.
33% 111. 71-73
349-
Rosr's Court I. 91
Ross's Towe:. or " Follv."
Rothes, Earls of, I. 159, 11. p, 218,
Rothesay, Duke of, 1. 26, 27. 142,
Rothesay, Earl of, 11. 65
Rothesay Place, 111. 62
Kothiemay, Lady, 1. 281
Rotten Row, Leith, 111. 167. 235
Kotunda The 11. 83
Roubilkk, the'sculptor I. 159
Routing Well, The, 11). 364
Row, Colonel Archibald, I. zoz ; his
wife s tomb, 1. 203
Row, the Church hiatorian, 111.260
Rowites The I. 239
Rowland Hili, the preacher, 11. 103
Roxburgh, Dukes of,I. 128,223,Il.
' 5 , '23
Roxburgh, Earls of, I. 223, 11. 3,
15,50,181,111.57; houseof 11.34
Roxburgh, Dr., botanist, IIi. 162
258
11. 47, 243. 111. 31, 32
Roxburgh Close I. 223
Roxburgh Club,'I. 375
Roxburgh parish 11. 135
Roxburgh Place 'I. 362 111 338
Roxburgh Terrice, 11. j38
Royal apartments in Holpood
Xowl dank. I. 217. 222, 24% 11.
Palace Piate 15
Fro 115, 136 170"171 *17a'
the, 1. 182
335337 *?40
*IQ) its curator 111. 98
111. 71
b y a i Bank Ciose, iI1. h 4 ; fire in
hsyal Blindksylum andschool, 11.
Royal Bo;anic Gardens, 111. gb,
Royal kircus, 11. '195, 199, *ZOI,
Royal Collegeof Physicians, I. 362,
11. 247
Royal Company of Archers 11.348
3, 354; their hall, Ii. * 3 y :
Royal Crescent 111. a6
Royal Edinbuigh Asylum, 111.
25,53
39
Royal Edinburgh Volunteers, I. 63,
Royal Exchange, The, I. 79, 183-
187, *r8 191, 228, 229, a42, 255,
11. 281 ?I]. 125 ;.plan of the, I.
* t 8 8 ; ;he Council Chamber, I.
11. 307. *377, 111. 105, 264
184, 186, Pkfc 7; back of the
Royal Exchange, Plafe 10
Royal family, Submission by the
Jacobites to the, 11. 247
Royal gardens, Holyrood Palace,
11. "65 *69, 9
Royal H~ghlanJ Society, 111. 127
Royal Horse Bazaar 11.225
Royal Hotel, 11. I&; its distinguhhed
guests, ib.
Royal Infirmary, 11. 146, 147, 28r,
282,296, 298-302, 359, 111. 114;
thenewbuilding 11.358,359,*361
Royal Institution,'The, 11. 83, 86,
88. 01. 0 2 : in 1810. 11. *84: at ..
present -11. "85 ='
Royal Lhth Volunteers, The, 111.
198, 264
burgh Castle, I. 32, 36, *68
Royal Life Guards 11. 217
Royal lodging, 0; palace, Edin-
Roval Maternitv Hosnital. 11.2'1
Royal Maternity and $impson hie-
Royal Medical S&iety, I. 123, 11.
morial Hospital 11. 362
yx.303, 111. 266, 311
Royal Riding School, 11. 334, 335
Royal Scots Grey Dragoons I. 64
Rqyal Scottish Academy, 11:86,88,
Royal Scottlsh Naval and Military
Royal Scotkh Volunteer review,
Royal Society, l h e , 11. 83, 86, 204,
89, 9x7 921, I97
Academy 11. 335
11. 320, 354. Plate 23
111. 77
~Oy.2 Terrace 11.103
Royal Terrace'Gardens, 111. 158
Royal tournaments, I. 35
Royston, Lord I. rrr,273,III.310,
311 ; eccenhc pranks of his
daughter, I. 111,135,III.11q, 312
Royston, III.308,310
Koyston Ca5tle, 111. 311
Ruddiman, Thorn=, grammarian,
I. 110, 123, 11. 291, 382, 111. 363
Ruddiman, theprinter, 11.310,III.
Ruglen, Earl of, 111. 122, 3'7
Ruins of the old Market Closeafter
Rule, Principal Gilbert, 111. 14, 16
Rullion Green, 111. p. 334. *337
Rumhold, Richard, 1. 59, 60
Runciman. the oainter. I. oz. axo.
363
the fire, I. *177.
Russell Bishop of Leith 111. 187
Russell: Rev. 'Dr. h d a e l , 111.
Russell the actor I. 350
Rutheriord, Lord: 11. 98, 174, 111.
RutAerford Sir John 11. 356
Rutherford: Alison, iI. 156
Rutherford, Andrew, 11. 156
Rutherford, Dr., the fint inventor
243
68 ITI
of gas, I. 274, 276, 11. 383; hu
nephew, Sir Walter Scott, I. 276
Rutherford the botanist 11. 1zo
Rutherford: Anne(Si WAterScott's
mother) 11. 142
Rutherfurd-Clark, Lord, 111.26
Ruthven David Lord I. 178
Ruthven: Williarn Loh I. 6 206
215, 316, 11. 66, 70, 71; II1.'174!
his dagger I. 317
Ruthven Si; Patrick, I. 52, 54, 95
Ruthven' the printer 11.18 111.271
Ruthven's Land L i d I. 5x6
Rutland Street, \I. I$, zog
Ryan, the actor, 11.23
S
Sabbath, Breaches of the, 11. 132,
Sadler Sir Ralph, 111. 154 20)
Sailin;, Early restrictions on, III.
I33
'59
ailors' Home, Leith, 111. a59
'Salamander Land," The, 1. 142
Salamander Street, Leith, 111. 239
Salisbury, Earl of I1 305
Salisbury Craigs, \. I&, 384,II. 60,
161, 303, 305, 34, 3'372 311. 111,
142
Salisbury Road 111. 55
Salmon, Charle;, the local poet, 11.
310
111. 164
Salmon Pool, The, Water of Leith,
Salt Backet The, 11. 178
Saltoun, h i d , 11. 343, 344
Fmpson's Grave,!I. 319
Sarnsou's Ribs, I. 11. 11. 312,
313
Sancto Claro, W i l l i de, 111. 35
Sanctuary Court-house, 11. 11
Sand Port Leith 111.171, 177,281
Sand PoriStreet' Leith 111. 259
Sandford Bishod 11. 1:6 111. 147
Sandford: Sir Dakel K. iI. 126
Sand-glasses, Use of, in law courts,
Sandiland, James, 111. 42
Sandilands, Sir James, I. 195, 245,
302 11. 47 65 111. 116
Sandhand's ho;e I 240
Saughton Bridge'IiI. 319, *3zo
Saughton Hall, iII. 19
Saughton House, I d . 3 9 , * 320; a
drunken brawl I11 19
Saughton Laan knd,'dl. 319
Saunders Street, 111. 76
Saxe-Coburg Place 111. 75
Schmitz, Dr.Leonhh, 11.111,III.
School House Wynd, 111.2
School Lane, 111. 28
Sciennes Court, 111. 54
Sciennes Hall 111. 51
Sciennes Hill house 111. 55
Sciennes b a n III. \4
Sciennes, The,' 111. 29, 50, 51, $2,
I. I72
81
Scott William Lord Stowell, I. 299
Scott: LordJdhn, 111. 322
Scott, Sir Gilbert, the architect, 11.
111, 213, 111. 243
Scott, Sir John, 1. 210
Scott, Sir Walter, I. 3, 7, 12, 7'. 75,
1077 '23,1% 1% 150, 1549 163.
166, 171,173, 179, 182, 211, 222, ... INDEX. 387 Rhind. David. architect. 11. 147 275, '2 6, I I t . 67 244 . Rhmd, {anet, ToAb of, 11. ...

Vol. 6  p. 387 (Rel. 0.11)

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Vol. 6  p. 370 (Rel. 0.11)

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Vol. 6  p. 385 (Rel. 0.11)

GENERAL INDEX. 371
Black Watch, 11. 89, 138, 149, 179.
Black Wigs ClLb, 111. 123
Blackwood, Hnilie, 111. 15
Blackwood, William, I. 157, 291,
11. 139, 141, 142 ; the saloon in
his establinhment, 11. * 141 ; his
rrsidence, 111. 50
BfacA-wood's Mapasiw, 1. 339, 11.
322, 111. 195 288
23; ;Fa# ;2; ;7;g; 1.g WirZtors
11.140 IIP. 74
Blair,' Sir Jdmes Hunter, Lord
Provost, I. 179, 373, 376, 11. 283,
111. 89
Blair of Avontoun. Lord President.
236, 2 , II:27, 29, 120, 161, 271,
Blair Street, I. 245, 376, 11. 231,
Blarquhan Laird of 111. 36
BIair's Cl&, I. 65. & 11. 329 ;the
Duke of Gordon's house, 1. *p
Blairs of Balthayock, Tom-house
ofthe 11. 139
Blanc, kippolyte J., architect, 111.
38
Bland, the comedian, I. 342, 343
Blaw Wearie 111. 305
Bkis-sifwr, ?he gratuity, 11. 290,
383, 119. 45, 1 3 6 ~ 2 ~
Zj8,III. I
291
Blew Stone The I. 79
Blind Schdl, Cdigmillar, 11. 336
Blockhouse of St. Anthony. Leith.
111. 222, "23
J'Blue Blanket," The, I. 34, '36,
43, 11. 262, 278, 111. 55
Blumenreich, Herr, 111.88
Blyth's Close, 1. ga, 111. 66
Bmk's Land, West Port, I. 224
Boar Club The 111. IW
Board of Manuiactnres, 11. 8 3 4 6 ,
Body-snatchers Early 11. 1.w
B o ~ l l y , R o d n ci& near, 111.
Bo%l?yTower 111. 326 "328
Bonham, Sir Galter. II.'57
Bonkel Sir Edward I. 304
Bonnet'birds' club', 111.123
Bonnet-makers The 11. 265
Bonnington, n&r Le'ith, 11.~5,III.
W. ,306 ; view in, 111. * 96
Bonntngton House, 111. 88, 91,
*93, 147
Bonnington Mill, 111. 90, 247
Bonniugton Road, l I I . 8 8 , 1 2 8 , 1 ~ ,
Bonnington Sugar-refining Com-
Bonnyhaugh 111.90 gr
Bordeaux, &c de,Hr Holyrood,
Boreland homas the pcssessor of
the k&g$ stable, 11. 225; his
house I. * 80 1I.a25,n6
Bore-s&e or hare-stone, The, I.
326, 111. 28
Bomwlaski, ;he '8o?i;h dwarf, 11.
166.167
Borthwick, Lord, I. 40, 262, 11.383,
Borthwick, Jam- 11. 383
Borthwick's Close, I. 190, 211, 242
BosweIl, Sir Alexander, 1.173.182,
88, 92, 186
'7'1 '84
pany, Leith, 111. 91. 236
11. 78, 7%
Ill. 348
2x39 243.258
101, 18% 299911. 66, 143 255 339
ifs9 ; Lord hlacaulay s :pinion 01
his father and mother, 'jq; o n.wn's visit to Edinburgh,
I. z 9, IIL.57, 291, 35a
Bormll Raj, Wardte, Ill. 308
Boswell's Court, I.
Botanical gardenq, %e, I. 362,363,
Bothwell, Earfs of,' I. 94 122, 168,
Bo=vell, Jam=, I. 6 8 3 , 97, 98, 99,
111. 159, 161 162 163
196, 106, m7, 209, 2 1 0 ~ 2 4 ~ ~ 258,
259, 266, 276, 298, 3741 11. 61, 71,
72 111. 3 6,7, 52, 6 1 , ~ ~ 174,
33; ; Lord fi arnlefs murder 111.
3-7 * marruge of Queen kary
to the Earl of, I. 219. 11. 71,
262; how Bothwell attracted the
Queen's notice, 11. 102
Rothwell, Adam, Bishop of Orkney,
I. 116, q, 11. 48, 49, 71,
181, 111. 35, 98
Bothwell, ohn Lord, 11. 49
Hothwell, Air Francis, 111. 35
Hothwell, ohn I 47 158
Hothwell AichArd, PAvost of Kirk-
Bothwell of Glencorse, Henry, I. pa
Bothwell Bridge, 11. 39, 87. 375
Bottle House Company, Leith, 111.
Bough, Samuel, the artist, 11. 86,
Boulder, Gigantic, 11. 312
Bourse, The, Leith, 111. 231; its
other names, ib.
Bower, the historian of Edinburgh
University, 111. 8, 9. 10. 11, 16,
of-Fielh, 111. 2
239
Ill. 68
. .
18 19, 308
BokFoot, The, 11. 13'
Rowfoot Well. I. 310 11. 233
Bowles, Caroline, 11.'-
Boyd, Lord, 111. 174, 180
Boyd Sir Thomas nmtewn, Lord
Bo d, J o k , Slaubhter of'the ruf-
PrdVOSt 11. 284 i11.88 288
Ln. 11. a
4 4 $1, 4 ,'326, a;i, 347, fi.- . "Braid dugh Somewilk of the
Writes " 1. 315, 16
Braid, L i r d of, IIt. 49
Braid The river 111. 143, 322
Braid'Village o< 111. to, 113 ;ex*
c d o n near, 1iI. 40; its historical
asxiations, 111. 41
Braid's Row 111. 75
Braidsbum, 'I. 326, 111. 49, 61, 327
Brand, Sir Alexander, I. m3, 378,
Brandof Baberton, Alexander, 111.
Brandfield P h 11.218
Brandfield Stree; 11. ar
Braxfield, Lord, i, 173, 11. 152,153,
Bread. Sale of. determined bv law.
11.21
334
339 . . 11.;80 '
Brea&lbe Earlof 1.378 I11 146
Breadalbani Marqkis of,'II.'86;
Breadalbme Stdet. Leith. 111. ax.
Marchion& of 11. zog
. . _ _ 236
II.84,111.2 9
Breakwater,TheNewhaven III.303
Bremner, David, 1. 283, 384,
Brewers, The &inburgh, 11. 68
Brewster, Sir David, 1.379,II. 140,
f57,III. q, 242: statueof 111.24
Brilxs, Acceptance of, by'judgea
and others, 1. 163, 164, 167,169
Brickfield, 111. 144
Bridewell, The, 11. 106, IT
Bridge-end, 111. 58
Bridges, Sir Egerton, I. 273
Bridges David, cloth merchnot,
Bright, John, M.P., 11. 284
Brighton Chapel, 11. 326
Brighton Place, Portobello 111.148
Hrlsbane, Sir T., Father d 11. 199
Bristo, 11. 135, 267, w, Ilt. 94
Bristo Park 11. 326
Bristo Port,'I. 38, 11. 234, 267, 316,
T3t.3249 325, 3 4 '32% 3Pp 379,
Brisro Street, I. 335, 11. 326.327,
I. I ~ ' - I I O ; his wife, I. 110
11. 94, 156
British Convention, The, 11. 236 ;
British Linen Company, I. a79.280,
11s governors and patrons, 1. 279
British Linen Co.'s Bank, Edinburgh
11 170 171, 172; at
Leith'III'z38 '23
British h e ; Hail, &nongate, 11.
31, 33, 83
xilure of its members, id.
355, 11. 33, 93, '731 '74, 111.344;
Broadstairs House, Causewayside,
Broad Wknd, Leith, 111. 167, 210,
111. 50 "52
236,238
Brodie, Deacon, Robberies cammitted
by, I. 1 1 s r 1 5 * 116. 217,
11.23, Ill. 3t7: lantein and keys
used by I. 115 : execution of,
1. 1x5 ; herview between Bmdie
and Smith, 1. * 117; his method
of robbery 11. 23
Brodie William the sculptor, I. 159,
Brodie s klos; 1.112
Brwke, Gnsdvus V., the actor, I.
357
Brwm Stock of, I. 377
Bmugham, Lord, I. 166, 379, 11.
i11 113 157 I 287, 292.347,
111: y :his b k a a c e , I. 168; his
mother, I. 168, 242 ; burial-place
nfhisfathcr,lII. 131 ; his statue,
1. I59
Bmughton, 1.335,II.3,191,III. 151
Broughton, Barony of, 11. I&
185, 186, 366,111. 83 86 I
Bmughton Hum in 1850, 184
Broughton Hall, Ill. 88, * 93
Broughton Loan, 11. E+ 115, 176,
Broughton Park, 111. 88
Broughton Place, 11. 183, 184
Broughton Street, 11. 178, 179, 183,
11. ;30 155 ill. 68,101
I&, 186, 188
184
Broughtan T o l b t h , The, 11. * 181
Broughton loll, 111. 95
Bronnga, John, the Nevhaven
Brown CaGt. Sir ?&uel, 111. 303
Brown: George, the builder, 11. 2%
B m . Thomas. architect. 11. IOI
hsherman 111. 5 p 6
~ m m ; Rev. Alexander, irr. 75-
Brown, Rev. Dr., 111. 51
Brown Square, 1. g1.11.260,268,
269, 274 =71r 339
Broww, Dr. James, I. 190, 339,II.
1 4 314, 111. 79
Browne Dr. Thomas, 11.395
Browndll, Williim, the naval adventurer,
I I I . I ~ ,
Rrownhill, the builder, 1. 98
Brown's Chapel (Or. John), Rose
Street, 11. 15 , 184
Brown's close 1. 8: p
Brown's taveA, Lkkgate Leith
111. 914 ; singular tragedy in, ib:
Browns of Greenbank, The, I. go
Hruce Lord 11. 354
Bruce: Sir hiichael 11. 168
BNC~ of Balcaskd and Kinross,
Sir William architect of Holyrood
Palace'l. 336 11. 74, 367
Bruce. Robe;. Lord Kennrtt. 11.
242
Rruce, Robert, sword of, 111. 355
Hruce Lady 111. 158
nruce'of RiAng's mansion, I. 2-4
Bruce of Kinnaird, the traveller, 1.
247, 111,162
Brucr of Kinloss, Lady, 11. 257
Rruce of Powfoulis Mrs 11. 16a
Bruce Michael, th: Sco;;ish Kirke
White, 111. 219
B ~ c e ' s Close, I. 223
Brunstane, 11. 34
Hrunstane Rum 111. 149
Brunstane, Laid of, 111. 150
Brunstane manor-house, 111. 149,
1509 Tl579.366
Brunsmck btmt, 111. 81
Hruntan Dr. I. 79 111. 83
Brunton'Pla& 191.
Bruntsfield Links, 11. 115,137, 222,
313, 348, 111. q~ 34 31, 33, 43 ;
the avenue 111. '33
Bruntsfield dr Warrender House,
Bryce, David, thearchitect, 11. 95,
97, 154 174 210, 359, 111. 82
Rryce John architect 11. 359
Brysoh Rodert 1.37;
Yuccle;ch, D&s of, 11. 21, 86,
211, 9 3 , 318, 358, 111. 198, 2x9,
d37 265, 270, F, 30% 311, 3r4 ;
Duchessof 11.115
Bucckuch, Hemy Duke of, 11. 310
Buccleuch Lady of 1. z06
Buccleuch'Free ChArch, 11. 346
Buccleuch Place, 11. 148, a68, 347,
Bucckoch Street, II. 339
111. 45,46, *48,
Ill. '25
Buchan, Earl of, 1. 34, 11. 8 6 , s ~
1% 2% 339, 111. 2s 123, 1%
180, 314
Buchanaii, George, I. 16, 143, 167,
206, ~ 5 . *4, 11. 67. 127. 363
111. 14 179, 19. -1, 998,363.
memorial window in new Greyfriars
Church, 11. 379
Bnchanan, lk. k'raocis, botanist,
111. 1-52
Buchanan of Auchintorlie, 11.159
Buchanan Street, 111. 15
Buckingham Tenace, 119. 67
Bnckstane The 111. 342
Buildings 'in Edinburgh, Ancient
laws regulating the I. rl
Bull, Capture of Sir 'Stephen, 111.
Bullock, William ; his plan for the
re-capture of Edinburgh Castle,
202
I. 25, 26.
Bunker's Hill, I. $6
Burdiehoux, 111. 342; fossil dLcoveries
near, id. .
Burdiehouse Burn 111. 322, 339
Burgess Close, Leith, 111.164 167.
Burgh Loch,The, 11. zgc, 346, 347,
Burg Loch Brewery, 11.349
Burphmuir. The. 1. U. ~ O A . ?I&
227, 232, 234, 249
* q 9 , 354
33r 326, >a3, iiL;;
35 170 342; muster of troops
udder jam- 111. and James IV.,
Ill. 28. the k - s c a n e , 111.~8,
* z g ; :dud in 17za, 111. p;
Valleyfield House and Leven
Ledge, id.; Barclay Freechurch,
76.; Hruntsfield Links and the
Golf clubs, ib. ; Gillespie's Hospital,
111. & *37: M e r c h w
Castle, ILI. 9% P**r 26
Burghmuir, Dlstrict of the, 111. q
-y ; battle of the (see Battles)
Burghmuir-head mad, 111. 38; thc
Free Church, i6.
Burial-ground, The first, in =inburgh,
I. 149
Burials under church porticoes, 11.
247
Burke and Hare, the murderers L
Im, 11. 226-230, Ill. 27
Burleigh Lord 1.127 ; escape from
the l.oiboot$ ib.
Burn, Willkm the architect, 11.
171, 111. 34 b8 85 255
Burnet, Jamei oith: TownGuud.
11.311
Burnet, Sir Thomas, 11. 147
Burnet of Monboddo, Miss, I. iq.
111.42
Burney, Dr the musician 11. zg
Burning of'ihe Pope in ;figy by
the Universitystudents, 111. II-
13. 57
Burns, Robert, I. 3,106, 107, 11g.
IW 154 171, 178, 17% 232,236.
I Y, 159, 187, 188, wl 27, 333
2397 348, 366, 11. p4 27. 307 3%
191. 42, 55, 161, 352 ; Ftxman s
statne of, 11.88, 110; Nasmyth's
y t r a i t of, 11. @ ; monument of,
1. 11% *IIZ; bust by Brodi,
11. 110: head Or, 11. 127
Bums' centenary The first 11.150
Burns, Colonel W. Nicol, &e poet's
son 11. Sg
Burn:, Miss, and Bailie Crcech, II. '
Bnrniisland, I. 58,111.180, 188,191,
158, 159
211,314
Burtou, Ur. John Hill, I. 98, 111.
42, 43; his literary work.. 111.
'
43
able article, 11. 219
86,111. 13:
Butcher meat formerly an unsale-
Bute, Earl of, 1. 164, 179, 272, 11.
Bute, Marquis of, 11. 346
Bute's Battery, 1. 78
Butler, John, the king's carpenter,
Butter Tron, The, I. 50,
thtters of F'itlochry, %'Le, 11.
11. 136
5 218
143
Byres, Sir John, I. 153, 219, 11-GENERAL INDEX. 371
Black Watch, 11. 89, 138, 149, 179.
Black Wigs ClLb, 111. 123
Blackwood, Hnilie, 111. 15
Blackwood, William, I. 157, 291,
11. 139, 141, 142 ; the saloon in
his establinhment, 11. * 141 ; his
rrsidence, 111. 50
BfacA-wood's Mapasiw, 1. 339, 11.
322, 111. 195 288
23; ;Fa# ;2; ;7;g; 1.g WirZtors
11.140 IIP. 74
Blair,' Sir Jdmes Hunter, Lord
Provost, I. 179, 373, 376, 11. 283,
111. 89
Blair of Avontoun. Lord President.
236, 2 , II:27, 29, 120, 161, 271,
Blair Street, I. 245, 376, 11. 231,
Blarquhan Laird of 111. 36
BIair's Cl&, I. 65. & 11. 329 ;the
Duke of Gordon's house, 1. *p
Blairs of Balthayock, Tom-house
ofthe 11. 139
Blanc, kippolyte J., architect, 111.
38
Bland, the comedian, I. 342, 343
Blaw Wearie 111. 305
Bkis-sifwr, ?he gratuity, 11. 290,
383, 119. 45, 1 3 6 ~ 2 ~
Zj8,III. I
291
Blew Stone The I. 79
Blind Schdl, Cdigmillar, 11. 336
Blockhouse of St. Anthony. Leith.
111. 222, "23
J'Blue Blanket," The, I. 34, '36,
43, 11. 262, 278, 111. 55
Blumenreich, Herr, 111.88
Blyth's Close, 1. ga, 111. 66
Bmk's Land, West Port, I. 224
Boar Club The 111. IW
Board of Manuiactnres, 11. 8 3 4 6 ,
Body-snatchers Early 11. 1.w
B o ~ l l y , R o d n ci& near, 111.
Bo%l?yTower 111. 326 "328
Bonham, Sir Galter. II.'57
Bonkel Sir Edward I. 304
Bonnet'birds' club', 111.123
Bonnet-makers The 11. 265
Bonnington, n&r Le'ith, 11.~5,III.
W. ,306 ; view in, 111. * 96
Bonntngton House, 111. 88, 91,
*93, 147
Bonnington Mill, 111. 90, 247
Bonniugton Road, l I I . 8 8 , 1 2 8 , 1 ~ ,
Bonnington Sugar-refining Com-
Bonnyhaugh 111.90 gr
Bordeaux, &c de,Hr Holyrood,
Boreland homas the pcssessor of
the k&g$ stable, 11. 225; his
house I. * 80 1I.a25,n6
Bore-s&e or hare-stone, The, I.
326, 111. 28
Bomwlaski, ;he '8o?i;h dwarf, 11.
166.167
Borthwick, Lord, I. 40, 262, 11.383,
Borthwick, Jam- 11. 383
Borthwick's Close, I. 190, 211, 242
BosweIl, Sir Alexander, 1.173.182,
88, 92, 186
'7'1 '84
pany, Leith, 111. 91. 236
11. 78, 7%
Ill. 348
2x39 243.258
101, 18% 299911. 66, 143 255 339
ifs9 ; Lord hlacaulay s :pinion 01
his father and mother, 'jq; o n.wn's visit to Edinburgh,
I. z 9, IIL.57, 291, 35a
Bormll Raj, Wardte, Ill. 308
Boswell's Court, I.
Botanical gardenq, %e, I. 362,363,
Bothwell, Earfs of,' I. 94 122, 168,
Bo=vell, Jam=, I. 6 8 3 , 97, 98, 99,
111. 159, 161 162 163
196, 106, m7, 209, 2 1 0 ~ 2 4 ~ ~ 258,
259, 266, 276, 298, 3741 11. 61, 71,
72 111. 3 6,7, 52, 6 1 , ~ ~ 174,
33; ; Lord fi arnlefs murder 111.
3-7 * marruge of Queen kary
to the Earl of, I. 219. 11. 71,
262; how Bothwell attracted the
Queen's notice, 11. 102
Rothwell, Adam, Bishop of Orkney,
I. 116, q, 11. 48, 49, 71,
181, 111. 35, 98
Bothwell, ohn Lord, 11. 49
Hothwell, Air Francis, 111. 35
Hothwell, ohn I 47 158
Hothwell AichArd, PAvost of Kirk-
Bothwell of Glencorse, Henry, I. pa
Bothwell Bridge, 11. 39, 87. 375
Bottle House Company, Leith, 111.
Bough, Samuel, the artist, 11. 86,
Boulder, Gigantic, 11. 312
Bourse, The, Leith, 111. 231; its
other names, ib.
Bower, the historian of Edinburgh
University, 111. 8, 9. 10. 11, 16,
of-Fielh, 111. 2
239
Ill. 68
. .
18 19, 308
BokFoot, The, 11. 13'
Rowfoot Well. I. 310 11. 233
Bowles, Caroline, 11.'-
Boyd, Lord, 111. 174, 180
Boyd Sir Thomas nmtewn, Lord
Bo d, J o k , Slaubhter of'the ruf-
PrdVOSt 11. 284 i11.88 288
Ln. 11. a
4 4 $1, 4 ,'326, a;i, 347, fi.- . "Braid dugh Somewilk of the
Writes " 1. 315, 16
Braid, L i r d of, IIt. 49
Braid The river 111. 143, 322
Braid'Village o< 111. to, 113 ;ex*
c d o n near, 1iI. 40; its historical
asxiations, 111. 41
Braid's Row 111. 75
Braidsbum, 'I. 326, 111. 49, 61, 327
Brand, Sir Alexander, I. m3, 378,
Brandof Baberton, Alexander, 111.
Brandfield P h 11.218
Brandfield Stree; 11. ar
Braxfield, Lord, i, 173, 11. 152,153,
Bread. Sale of. determined bv law.
11.21
334
339 . . 11.;80 '
Brea&lbe Earlof 1.378 I11 146
Breadalbani Marqkis of,'II.'86;
Breadalbme Stdet. Leith. 111. ax.
Marchion& of 11. zog
. . _ _ 236
II.84,111.2 9
Breakwater,TheNewhaven III.303
Bremner, David, 1. 283, 384,
Brewers, The &inburgh, 11. 68
Brewster, Sir David, 1.379,II. 140,
f57,III. q, 242: statueof 111.24
Brilxs, Acceptance of, by'judgea
and others, 1. 163, 164, 167,169
Brickfield, 111. 144
Bridewell, The, 11. 106, IT
Bridge-end, 111. 58
Bridges, Sir Egerton, I. 273
Bridges David, cloth merchnot,
Bright, John, M.P., 11. 284
Brighton Chapel, 11. 326
Brighton Place, Portobello 111.148
Hrlsbane, Sir T., Father d 11. 199
Bristo, 11. 135, 267, w, Ilt. 94
Bristo Park 11. 326
Bristo Port,'I. 38, 11. 234, 267, 316,
T3t.3249 325, 3 4 '32% 3Pp 379,
Brisro Street, I. 335, 11. 326.327,
I. I ~ ' - I I O ; his wife, I. 110
11. 94, 156
British Convention, The, 11. 236 ;
British Linen Company, I. a79.280,
11s governors and patrons, 1. 279
British Linen Co.'s Bank, Edinburgh
11 170 171, 172; at
Leith'III'z38 '23
British h e ; Hail, &nongate, 11.
31, 33, 83
xilure of its members, id.
355, 11. 33, 93, '731 '74, 111.344;
Broadstairs House, Causewayside,
Broad Wknd, Leith, 111. 167, 210,
111. 50 "52
236,238
Brodie, Deacon, Robberies cammitted
by, I. 1 1 s r 1 5 * 116. 217,
11.23, Ill. 3t7: lantein and keys
used by I. 115 : execution of,
1. 1x5 ; herview between Bmdie
and Smith, 1. * 117; his method
of robbery 11. 23
Brodie William the sculptor, I. 159,
Brodie s klos; 1.112
Brwke, Gnsdvus V., the actor, I.
357
Brwm Stock of, I. 377
Bmugham, Lord, I. 166, 379, 11.
i11 113 157 I 287, 292.347,
111: y :his b k a a c e , I. 168; his
mother, I. 168, 242 ; burial-place
nfhisfathcr,lII. 131 ; his statue,
1. I59
Bmughton, 1.335,II.3,191,III. 151
Broughton, Barony of, 11. I&
185, 186, 366,111. 83 86 I
Bmughton Hum in 1850, 184
Broughton Hall, Ill. 88, * 93
Broughton Loan, 11. E+ 115, 176,
Broughton Park, 111. 88
Broughton Place, 11. 183, 184
Broughton Street, 11. 178, 179, 183,
11. ;30 155 ill. 68,101
I&, 186, 188
184
Broughtan T o l b t h , The, 11. * 181
Broughton loll, 111. 95
Bronnga, John, the Nevhaven
Brown CaGt. Sir ?&uel, 111. 303
Brown: George, the builder, 11. 2%
B m . Thomas. architect. 11. IOI
hsherman 111. 5 p 6
~ m m ; Rev. Alexander, irr. 75-
Brown, Rev. Dr., 111. 51
Brown Square, 1. g1.11.260,268,
269, 274 =71r 339
Broww, Dr. James, I. 190, 339,II.
1 4 314, 111. 79
Browne Dr. Thomas, 11.395
Browndll, Williim, the naval adventurer,
I I I . I ~ ,
Rrownhill, the builder, 1. 98
Brown's Chapel (Or. John), Rose
Street, 11. 15 , 184
Brown's close 1. 8: p
Brown's taveA, Lkkgate Leith
111. 914 ; singular tragedy in, ib:
Browns of Greenbank, The, I. go
Hruce Lord 11. 354
Bruce: Sir hiichael 11. 168
BNC~ of Balcaskd and Kinross,
Sir William architect of Holyrood
Palace'l. 336 11. 74, 367
Bruce. Robe;. Lord Kennrtt. 11.
242
Rruce, Robert, sword of, 111. 355
Hruce Lady 111. 158
nruce'of RiAng's mansion, I. 2-4
Bruce of Kinnaird, the traveller, 1.
247, 111,162
Brucr of Kinloss, Lady, 11. 257
Rruce of Powfoulis Mrs 11. 16a
Bruce Michael, th: Sco;;ish Kirke
White, 111. 219
B ~ c e ' s Close, I. 223
Brunstane, 11. 34
Hrunstane Rum 111. 149
Brunstane, Laid of, 111. 150
Brunstane manor-house, 111. 149,
1509 Tl579.366
Brunsmck btmt, 111. 81
Hruntan Dr. I. 79 111. 83
Brunton'Pla& 191.
Bruntsfield Links, 11. 115,137, 222,
313, 348, 111. q~ 34 31, 33, 43 ;
the avenue 111. '33
Bruntsfield dr Warrender House,
Bryce, David, thearchitect, 11. 95,
97, 154 174 210, 359, 111. 82
Rryce John architect 11. 359
Brysoh Rodert 1.37;
Yuccle;ch, D&s of, 11. 21, 86,
211, 9 3 , 318, 358, 111. 198, 2x9,
d37 265, 270, F, 30% 311, 3r4 ;
Duchessof 11.115
Bucckuch, Hemy Duke of, 11. 310
Buccleuch Lady of 1. z06
Buccleuch'Free ChArch, 11. 346
Buccleuch Place, 11. 148, a68, 347,
Bucckoch Street, II. 339
111. 45,46, *48,
Ill. '25
Buchan, Earl of, 1. 34, 11. 8 6 , s ~
1% 2% 339, 111. 2s 123, 1%
180, 314
Buchanaii, George, I. 16, 143, 167,
206, ~ 5 . *4, 11. 67. 127. 363
111. 14 179, 19. -1, 998,363.
memorial window in new Greyfriars
Church, 11. 379
Bnchanan, lk. k'raocis, botanist,
111. 1-52
Buchanan of Auchintorlie, 11.159
Buchanan Street, 111. 15
Buckingham Tenace, 119. 67
Bnckstane The 111. 342
Buildings 'in Edinburgh, Ancient
laws regulating the I. rl
Bull, Capture of Sir 'Stephen, 111.
Bullock, William ; his plan for the
re-capture of Edinburgh Castle,
202
I. 25, 26.
Bunker's Hill, I. $6
Burdiehoux, 111. 342; fossil dLcoveries
near, id. .
Burdiehouse Burn 111. 322, 339
Burgess Close, Leith, 111.164 167.
Burgh Loch,The, 11. zgc, 346, 347,
Burg Loch Brewery, 11.349
Burphmuir. The. 1. U. ~ O A . ?I&
227, 232, 234, 249
* q 9 , 354
33r 326, >a3, iiL;;
35 170 342; muster of troops
udder jam- 111. and James IV.,
Ill. 28. the k - s c a n e , 111.~8,
* z g ; :dud in 17za, 111. p;
Valleyfield House and Leven
Ledge, id.; Barclay Freechurch,
76.; Hruntsfield Links and the
Golf clubs, ib. ; Gillespie's Hospital,
111. & *37: M e r c h w
Castle, ILI. 9% P**r 26
Burghmuir, Dlstrict of the, 111. q
-y ; battle of the (see Battles)
Burghmuir-head mad, 111. 38; thc
Free Church, i6.
Burial-ground, The first, in =inburgh,
I. 149
Burials under church porticoes, 11.
247
Burke and Hare, the murderers L
Im, 11. 226-230, Ill. 27
Burleigh Lord 1.127 ; escape from
the l.oiboot$ ib.
Burn, Willkm the architect, 11.
171, 111. 34 b8 85 255
Burnet, Jamei oith: TownGuud.
11.311
Burnet, Sir Thomas, 11. 147
Burnet of Monboddo, Miss, I. iq.
111.42
Burney, Dr the musician 11. zg
Burning of'ihe Pope in ;figy by
the Universitystudents, 111. II-
13. 57
Burns, Robert, I. 3,106, 107, 11g.
IW 154 171, 178, 17% 232,236.
I Y, 159, 187, 188, wl 27, 333
2397 348, 366, 11. p4 27. 307 3%
191. 42, 55, 161, 352 ; Ftxman s
statne of, 11.88, 110; Nasmyth's
y t r a i t of, 11. @ ; monument of,
1. 11% *IIZ; bust by Brodi,
11. 110: head Or, 11. 127
Bums' centenary The first 11.150
Burns, Colonel W. Nicol, &e poet's
son 11. Sg
Burn:, Miss, and Bailie Crcech, II. '
Bnrniisland, I. 58,111.180, 188,191,
158, 159
211,314
Burtou, Ur. John Hill, I. 98, 111.
42, 43; his literary work.. 111.
'
43
able article, 11. 219
86,111. 13:
Butcher meat formerly an unsale-
Bute, Earl of, 1. 164, 179, 272, 11.
Bute, Marquis of, 11. 346
Bute's Battery, 1. 78
Butler, John, the king's carpenter,
Butter Tron, The, I. 50,
thtters of F'itlochry, %'Le, 11.
11. 136
5 218
143
Byres, Sir John, I. 153, 219, 11- ... INDEX. 371 Black Watch, 11. 89, 138, 149, 179. Black Wigs ClLb, 111. 123 Blackwood, Hnilie, 111. ...

Vol. 6  p. 371 (Rel. 0.1)

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Vol. 6  p. 379 (Rel. 0.08)

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Vol. 6  p. 380 (Rel. 0.08)


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