Old and New Edinburgh

Old and New Edinburgh

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Index for “lady glenorchy”

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Vol. 2  p. 361 (Rel. 4.7)

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Vol. 4  p. 338 (Rel. 2.81)

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Vol. 6  p. 317 (Rel. 2.61)

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Vol. 2  p. 359 (Rel. 2.52)

360 OLD AND NEW EDINBURGH. [North Bridge
they occupied when obtained, that we are tempted to
conclude the genteeler part of the congregations in
Edinburgh deem the essential duties of religion to
be concentrated in holding and paying rent for so
many feet square in the inside of a church."
- Lady Glenorchy, whom Kincaid describes as '' a
young lady eminent for good sense and every
accomplishment that could give dignity to her
rank, and for the superior piety which made her conspicuous
as a Christian," in 1772 feued a piece of
ground from the managers of the Orphan Hospital,
at a yearly duty of d15, on which she built her
chapel, of which (following the example of Lady
Yester in another part of the city) she retained the
patronage, and the entire management with herself,
and certain persons appointed by her.
In the following year she executed a deed,
which declared that the managers of the Orphan
Hospital should have liberty (upon asking it in
proper time) to employ a preacher occasionally in
her chapel, if it was not otherwise employed, and
to apply the collections made on these occasions
in behalf of the hospital. On the edifice being
finished, she'addressed the following letter to the
Moderator of the Presbytery of Edinburgh :-
" Edin., April zgth, 1774.
"REVEREND SIR,-It is a general complaint that the
churches of this city which belong to the Establishment are
not proportioned to the number of its inhabitants, Many
who are willing to pay for seats cannot obtain them ; and no
space is left for the poor, but the remotest areas, where few of
those who find room to stand can get within hearing of any
ordinary voice. I have thought it my duty to employ part
of that substance with which God has been pleased to
entrust me in building a chapel within the Orphan House
Park, in which a considerable number of our communion
who at present are altogether unprovided may enjoy the
benefit of the same ordinances which are dispensed in the
parish churches, and where I hope to have the pleasure of
accommodating some hundreds of poor people who have
long been shut out from one of the best and to some of them
the only means of instruction in the principles of our holy
religion.
" The chapel will soon be ready to receive a congregation,
and it is my intention to have it supplied with a minister 01
approved character and abilities, who will give sufficient
security for his soundness in the faith and loyalty to Govern
ment.
"It will give me pleasure to be informed that the Pres.
bytery approve of my design, and that it will be agreeable tc
them that I should ask occasional supply from such ministen
and probationers as I am acquainted with, till a congregatior
be formed and supplied with a stated minister.-I am, Rev,
Sir, Src '' W. GLENORCKY."
The Presbytery being fully convinced not onlj
of the piety of her intentions, but the utility o
having an additional place of worship in the city
unanimously approved of the design, and in May,
1774, her chapel was opened by the Rev. Robert
Walker of the High Church, and Dr. John Erskine of
the Greyfriars ; but a number of clergy were by no
means friendly to the erection of this chapel in any
way, on the plea that the footing on which it was
admitted into connection with the Church was not
sufficiently explicit, and eventually they brought the
matter before the Synod of Lothian and Tweeddale.
Lady Glenorchy acquainted the Presbytery, in 1775,
that she intended to place in the chapel an English
dissenting preacher named Grove. The Presbytery
wrote, that though they approved of her
piety, they could give no countenance whatever to
a minister who was not a member of the Church of
Scotland; and Mr. Grove foreseeing a contest,
declined the charge, and now ensued a curious
controversy.
Lady Glenorchy again applied to the Presbytery,
wishing as incumbent the Rev. Mr. Balfour, then
minister of Lecroft; but he, with due respect for
the Established Church and its authority, declined
to leave his pastoral charge until he was assured
that the Presbytery of the city would instal him in
the chapel. The latter approved of her selection,
but declined the installation, unless there x-as a
regular " call " from the congregation, and security
given that the offerings at the chapel were never to
be under the administration of the managers of the
charity workhouse.
With this decision she declined to comply, and
wrote, " That the chapel was her own private property,
and had never been intended to be put on the
footing of the Establishment, nor connected with it
as a chapel, of ease to the city of Edinburgh ; That
having built it at her own expense, she was entitled
to name the minister : That she wished to convince
the Presbytery of her inclination, that her minister,
though not on the Establishment, should hold communication
with its members : That, with respect
to the offerings, everybody knew that she had a p
pointed trustees for the management of them, and
that those who were not pleased with this mode of
administration might dispose of their alms elsewhere;
adding that she had once and again sent part of
these offerings to the treasurer of the charity workhouse."
A majority of the Presbytery now voted her reply
satisfactory, agreed to instal her minister, and that
he should be in communion with the Established
Church, '' Thus," says h o t , who seems antagonistic
to the founders, " did the Presbytery give every
mark of countenance, and almost every benefit
arising from the Established Church, while this institution
was not subject to their jurisdiction ; while ... for so many feet square in the inside of a church." - Lady Glenorchy , whom Kincaid describes as '' ...

Vol. 2  p. 360 (Rel. 2.36)

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Vol. 2  p. 362 (Rel. 2.02)

vi OLD AND NEW EDINBURGH.
CHAPTER XXIII. ,
THE HIGH STREET (continued).
PAGR ' The Black Turnpike-Bitter Reception of Quem Mary-Lambie's Bannei-Mary in the Black Turnpike-The House of Fenton-Its
Picturesque Appearance-The House of Bassandyne the Printer, 1574-" Bishop's Land," Town House of AKhbhhop Spottiswood-
Its various Tenants-% Stuart Thriepland-The Town-house of ths Hendersons of Fordel-The Lpdging of the Earls of Crawford-
The First Shop of Allan Rams.g-The Religious Feeling of the People-Ancrum House-The First Shop of .Constable and Co.-
Manners and Millar, Booksellers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 204
- CHAPTER XXV.
THE HIGH STREET (coalinued).
The Neighbourhood of Knox's House-Mmerino Mansion-Singular Accident-The Knos Memorial ChurchSociety CI-John
Knox's House-The '' Preaching Window "-His Wives-Attempted Aqmsination-Last Sermon-Death and Burial-James of
Jerusalem-House of Archbishop Sharp-The Birthplace of W i l l i FaIconef-Old Excise Offices-The Nether Bow Part-The
Earlier Gate-Th; Regent Morton's Surp<se Party-Tne Last Gate-Its Demolition . . . . . . . . . . 212
CHAPTER XXV.
THE HIGH STREET (continued).
Thz Ancient Markets-The House of Adam Bothwell, Bishop of Orkney-The Bishop and Queen Mary-His Sister Anne-Sir William Dick
of Braid-His Colossal Wealth-Hard Furtune-lhe "Lamentable State "-Advocates' Close-Sir lames S.ewart's Holm-Andrew
CroSbie, *' Counsehx Pleydell "-Scougal's House-His Picture Gallery-Roxburgbe Close-Warriston's Close-Lord Philiphaugh's
House-Bmce of Binning's Mansion-Mess=. W. and R. Chambers's Printing and Publishing Establishment--History of the Firm-
House of Sir Thomas Craig-Sir Archibald Johnston of Wariston . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 219
CHAPTER XXVI.
THE HIGH STREET (continued).
M q Rig's Cke-Who was Mary ?-Scourged by the Plague of *s-Its Mystery-Drummond's Epigram-hf. Sirtclaifs 'I Satan's
' Invklble World Discovered $'-MT. and Mrs. Coltheart's Ghostly Visitors-The Close finally abandoned to Goblins-Craig's Close-
Andro Hart, Bookseller and Printer-Andro Hart's Spear-A Menagefie in Craig's ClostThe Isle of Man Arms-The Cape Club-
Its Mysteries and OCcegInstallation of a Knight-Provincial Cape ClubbThe Poker ClukHow it Originated-Membm-
Office-bearc+OId Stamp Office Court-Fortune's Tavern-The beautiful Countess of Eglinton-Her Patronage of Letters-Her
Family-Interview with Dr. Johnson-Murderous Riot in the Close-Removal of the Stamp Office . . . . . . . 227
CHAPTER XXVII.
THE HIGH STREET (continued).
Tie Anchor Close-Dawney Douglas% Taw-The 'a Crnwn Rwm"-The Crochallan Club-Members-Burns among the Crochallan
Fencihles-Smellie's Printing Of5ctDandas's House, Fleshmarket Clo~-Mylne's Squue-Lord Alva's How-The Countess of
Sutherland and Lady Glenorchy-Birthplace of Fergucson-Halkerston's Wynd Port-Kinloch's Close-Carmbber's Close-The
Episcopal Chapel-Clam Shell Land--Captain Matthew Henderson-Allan Ramsay's Theatre-Its later Tenants-The Tailor's Hall-
Bailie Fyfe's Closc-" Heave awa' lads, I'm no deid yet "-Chalmers' Close-Hope's House-Sandiland's Close-Bishop Kennedy's
Housc-Grant's Close-Baron Grant's H-se . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 235
CHAPTER XXVIII.
THE HIGH STREET (continre.l).
The Salamander Land "-The Old Fihmarka Close-Heriot's Mansion-The Decnste<s Hmse-Borthwick's ClostLmd Durie's House
-Old Assembly Rooms-Edinburgh Assemblies, I/ZO-S3-MiSS Nicky Murray-Formalities of the Balls-Ladies' Fashions-Assemblies
Removed to Bell's Wynd-Blair Street and Hunter's Square-Kennedy's Close-George Buchanan's Death--Nidd,y's Wynd-Nicoi
Edwards' House-A Case of Homicide in 1597-A Quack Dacta-Livingstone's Liberty . . . . . . . . . . 24."
,
CHAPTER XXIX.
THE HIGH STREET (confinued.)
Niddry's Wynd --Provast Edwads House-Lmkhart's Court-St. Mary's Chapel-Masonic Lodge Meetings-Vintess Glenorchy-The
Story of Lady Graoge-St. Cecili'. Hall-Its Old-fashioned Concerts-The Belles of the Etghteenth Century-The Name Niddry . 246
. CHAPTER XXX.
THE HIGH STREET (confinued).
Dicksons' and Cant's Closes-The House of the " Scottish Hogarth and the Knight of Tillybole-Rosehaugh's, or Strichen's, Close-House
of the Abbots of Melrose-Sir George Mackenzie of Rosehaugh-Lady Anne Dick-Lord Strichen-The Manners of 1730-Provost
Griey-John Dhu, Corporal of the City Guard-Lady Lovdtk Land-Walter Chapman, Printer-Lady Lovat . . . . . 253 ... House, Fleshmarket Clo~-Mylne's Squue-Lord Alva's How-The Countess of Sutherland and Lady Glenorchy ...

Vol. 2  p. 388 (Rel. 1.8)

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Vol. 2  p. 238 (Rel. 1.54)

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Vol. 4  p. 335 (Rel. 1.5)

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Vol. 4  p. 334 (Rel. 1.5)

Kirk-of- Field.] THE CONSPIRACY AGAINST DARNLEY. 5
IZ. our lady kirk of field
13. ye kirk of field kirk y i '
I+ ye potterraw .. .. .. The Pot:er Row.
15. ye caich ill gait . . . . The Catchpole Gate.
. . Our Lady Kirk-of-Field. . . The Kirk-of-Field kirk y d .
EXPLANATION OF THE ORIGINAL I
I. ye blak freiris . . . . .. The Black Friars.
a. ye priestis chameris . . . . The priest's chambers.
3. ye well .. .. . . .. The well.
4. ye mylk row . . .. . . The Milk Row.
5. our lady stapis . . Our Lady's steos.
6. ye Dukis gaitt ofchattiiieraur
7. ye lu+ att ye king was keipit
8. ye place of ye murthqr . . . . The lace of the murder.
9. ye provost place ..
The Duke of Chatelherault's gate.
The lodging at which the King
eftir his murthur . . . , was kept after his murder,
. . .. The Frovast's place. ... Field.] THE CONSPIRACY AGAINST DARNLEY. 5 IZ. our lady kirk of field 13. ye kirk of field kirk y i ' I+ ...

Vol. 5  p. 5 (Rel. 1.49)

... Vlll OLD' AND NEW EDINBURGH.
CHAPTER XXXIX.
, T H E W E S T B 0 W (conclud-d.) PAGE
A Hand to Hand Combat in the Bow-Murder'in 1h5 in the Bow-The House of Lord Ruthven-The Hidden Sword-Processions in the
Bow-The Jacobite Prisoners-House of Provost Stewart-A Secret Entertainment to Prince Charles-Donaldson the Printer-State of
Printing and Publishing in his Day-The Edimburck Adwcrfiser-Splendid Fortunc of his Descendant-Town House ,of the
Napiers of Wrightshouse-Trial of Barbara Napier for Witchcdt-Clcckmaker's Land-Paul Romieu-The Mahogany Land-
Duncan Campbell, Chirurgeon-Templar Houses
.
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 315
CHAPTER XL.
E D I N B U R G H I N 1745.
Pmvost Stewart-Advance of the Jacobite Clans-Preparations far DefenctCapturc of the City-Lachiel's Surp&-Entance of Prince
Charles-Arrival at Holyrood-JamesVIII. Proclaimed at the Cross-Conduct of the Highland Tmps in the City-Colquhoun Grant-
A Triumphal ProcessiOn--Guest's Council of War-Preston's Fidelity . . . . . . . . . . . . . jZZ
CHAPTER XLI.
EDINBURGH IN 1745 (concluded),
General Guest's "Brave~~"-Popularity of the Prince-Castle Blockaded-It Fires on the City-Leith Bombarded-End of the Blockade
-Departure of the Highland Army for ' England-Prisoners in the Castle-Macdonald of Teindreich-Duke of Cumberland in
Ediiburgh-Burning of the Standards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 329
CHAPTER XLII.
T H E NORTH BRIDGE.
The New Town projected by Jams VIL-The North Bridge and other Structures by the Earl of Mar, 1728-Oppased in 175g-Foundation
Stone Laid-Erection Delayed till 1$5-Henderson's Plan-William Mylne appointed Architect-Terms of the Contract-Fall of the
Bridge-Repired and Completed--The Upper and Lower Flesh-Markets-Old Post OffictAdam Black-Ann Street-The Ettrick
Shepherd and the .. Nocks"-The Bridge Widened . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 334
CHAPTER XLIII.
EAST SIDE OF THE NORTH BRIDGE.
Dingwall's Castle-Whitefield's " Preachings "-History of the Old Theatre Royal-The Building-David Ross's Management-Leased to
Mr. Foote-Then to Mr. Digges-Mr. Moss-Mrs. Yates-Next Leased to Mr. Jackson-The Siddons Ram-Reception of the Great
Actress-Mrs. Baddeley-New Patent-the playhouse Riot--"The Scottish Roscius"-A Ghost-Expiry of the Patent . . . 340
CHAPTER XLIV..
EAST SIDE OF THE NORTH BRIDGE (continued).
Old Theatre Royal-Management of Mr. Henry Siddons-Mr. Mumy-Miss O'Neill-Production of Rd Roy-Visit of George IV. to the
Theatre- Eoinburgh Theatrical Fund-Scott and his Novels-Retirement of Mr. Mumy-The Management of Mr. and ME.
Wyndham-The Closing Night of the Theatre . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 348
CHAPTER XLV.
EAST SIDE OF THE NORTH BRIDGE (codinwed).
Memorabilia of the General Post Office-First Postal Svstem in Scotland-First Communication with Irdand-Sanctions given by the Scottish
Parliament-Expenses of the Establkhment at various Periods-The Horse Posts-Violation of Letter Bags-Casualties of the Period-
The First Stage Coach-Peter Willison-The Various Post Ofice Buildings--The Waterloo Place Office-Royal Arms Removed-
New 06ce Built-Staffand F d Details . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .353
CHAPTER XLVI.
EAST SIDE OF THE NORTH BRIDGE (concluded).
The Old Orphan Hospital-It5 Foundation, Object, and Removal-Lady Glenorchy's Chapel-Her Disputes with the Presbytery-Dr. Snell
JonesDemolition of the Chapel and School-Old PhysiC Gardens Formed-The Gardens-& Andrew Balfour-James Suthe.-land-
. Inundatedin ~~Sutherland5EffortstoImprovetheGardens-ProfessorHope . . . . . . . . . . . 359 ... OF THE NORTH BRIDGE (concluded). The Old Orphan Hospital-It5 Foundation, Object, and Removal- Lady Glenorchy 's ...

Vol. 2  p. 390 (Rel. 1.17)

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Vol. 5  p. 137 (Rel. 1.16)

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Vol. 5  p. 158 (Rel. 1.14)

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Vol. 2  p. 235 (Rel. 0.96)

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Vol. 1  p. 169 (Rel. 0.94)

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Vol. 4  p. 244 (Rel. 0.91)

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Vol. 4  p. 208 (Rel. 0.91)

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Vol. 1  p. 84 (Rel. 0.89)

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Vol. 1  p. 105 (Rel. 0.88)

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Vol. 4  p. 257 (Rel. 0.86)

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Vol. 6  p. 193 (Rel. 0.85)

GENERAL INDEX. 379
.Her!or brewery, The, 11.374
Henot free schools, 11. 374 37:
Heriot Kow, 11.1~5, 158,194, 201
.Heriot's Bridge, 11. 234
Heriot's Green, 11. 371, 372, 373
Heriot's Hill, I l l . 86, 87
.Heriot's Hill House, 111. *88
Heriot's Hospital, I. 48, 55, 64, 76,
134, 176, 242, 335, 11. 33s 84, 115.
its designer, rb. ; curious itemsof
expenditure, ib.; generaldescription
of the building 11. 369, 370 ;
views of the hospidl, II.364,368,
Heriot's School, I. 198, 11. 184, 250,
37% 373, 376, 379. pb& 24
274
Lord)
265. 266
266
Heriot's Trust, 11. 358
Hermand, Lord (sec Fergusson,
Hermitage, The, Leith Links, 111.
Hermitage Hill, Leith, III.175,186,
Hermitage Place, 111. 79
Hermitage Terrace 111. 266
Heron's Court. I. ,b~
Herries, Sir Rbberi I. 179
Herring Sir John 111. 346
Herrini fishery, $he Newhaven,
111. $2 - -
Hertford, Earl of, I. 43, lob, 217,
11. 2, 48, 56, 111. 169, 179, 218,
3'07 347,
.Heme Prinrr of 111. 194
High kalton T i e street 11. 103
High Churc'h The, &.* Giles's
Cathedral, 1: 14x '148 149
High Constables o t the dalton, 11.
'03
High Constables, Society of, 11. 23
Highest buildings in Edinburgh, I.
Hiehla;ldar;dAericultural Society's
*168 191 193
chambers, I.'zg~, zg
Highland Society of &cotland, I.
$94,295
ighlanders in Edinburgh, I. 322
323,324. 11,133 ; employmental
11. 235 ; Gaelic chapel for ib.
Highlanders,Revultofthe S'eaforth,
Highrtggs, 11. 222, 223, 230, 325,
366 111. Z,%
Highiiggs 80use 11. 223
.High School of ddinburgh, I. 110,
963, 11. 1 1 ~ 1 1 3 , 168, 2-1 259,
303, 327, 314! 111. 3, 86;k:story
of the old igh School, 11. 287-
193; thesecond High School, 11.
193; the new High School, 11.
1x0-114; views of the High
School, 11. *113, *q*, *z#;
carved stone over the entrance to
the first High School 11. .
eminent masters and kctors:%:
2-06
11. 307-310
Hiih S&Al brawls 11.289
High School Close '11. 17
High School Club'The, 11. 113
High School, Leith 111. *265
High Fhool Wynd, I. 11. 249,
High'School Yard, 11. 275, 293,
J&h'J%t, The, I. P, 31, 43, 79,
947 I212 123, 126, 1.53, 1541
155,183,187,191-a82~335,II. 64,
95, 119, '57s 239, 24'2 2431 25%
138, I++; conflicts in the, I. 39,
50, 55 194-196. first paved and
lighteh, I. '92'; high-storeyed
houses, ib. ; removal of household
garbage, 193; the night watch,
194 ; use offire-arms in the streetr
forbidden, ib . fights between
rival clans, 1&196 ; abduction
of women and girls, 197 ; sump
tuary laws a inst women 197
198 ; the LorrF'rovost, 19;; th;
a t y police, ib. ; banquets at the
C m , zoo; city constables, I.
203 ; cleanliness enforced, ib. 1
the city lighted withgas, ib. ; the
Black Turnpike, zq; bitter re.
ception of Queen Mary, ib. ; the
house of Fentonbans. 207 j Ban-
250
02
253, 286, 287, 112 I2
283, 2938 294, 375, Id. 6, Ia,47.
natwe, the printer ib. . the
Bishop's Land, 208 its dishguished
residents, ib. ; the Earls
of Crawford zag - the first shop
of Allan Kakay,' 210 ; Ancrum
Hou~e, zrz: the first shop of
Constable and Co., 212 213;
Manners and Millar, book&llers,
213; ancient houses, ib. ; Knox's
house and church, ib. ; &herino
mansion, ib. ; the preaching
window Knox'shouse 214; house
of Archbishop Shkpe, 21s ;
the Nether Bow Port, ar,; the
earlier gate ib, ; the Kegent
Morton's su&riw party, 218. the
last gate, ib.; the ancient marirets,
zr9 ; house of Adam Rothwell
Bishop of Orkney, ib. ; the bishoi
and Queen Mary, ib . Sir Wilrim
Dick of Braid, z;dr 221 ; his
colo~sal wealth, a m ; hard fortune,
ib. ; Advocates' Close, ib. ;
Sir James Stewart's house, ib. ;
Andrew Crosbie, ib. ; Scougal's
picture-gallery, 223 ; Roxburghe
Close, ib. ; Warriston's Close. ab. ;
William and Robert Chambers
224-226 ; house of Sir Thond
Craig, 226 ; Sir Archibald Johnston
of Warriston 226 127 ; Mary
King's Close i27 f Mr. and
Mrs. Colthearh ghostly visitors
rb. . Craig's Close 229 * Andd
H& bwkselly, b. ; tke " Isle
of Man Arms, 230; the Cape
Club cb . the Poker Club ib .
Old k&p Office Close, '23; f
Fortune's lavern, ib. ; the Countess
of Eglinton, 231-234 ; murderous
riot in the Close, 234 ; the
Anchor Close 235; Dawney
Dou 185's tavirn 235 236; the
CpcLllan Club,' 235 f Smellie's
printing-office 235, 236. Mylne's
Square, 2 3 d z 3 8 : ~orld AI='s
house, 237; thecountess ofSutherland
and lady Glenorchy,
237, 238; Halkerston's Wynd
238 : Kinlochs Clox, ib. ; Car!
rubber's Close, 238140 ; Capt.
Matthew Hendemn, 239 ; Alkn
R-y's theatre, ib.; its later
tenants, id. ; the Tailors' Hall
239,240 ; *' Hyve awa, lads, I d
no deid yet ib. . Chalmers'
Close, -16. ; hope's'house, ib, ;
Sandiland's Close, ib. ; Bishop
Kennedy's house, ib.; Baron
Grant's House, ,:41; the " Salamander
Land 242 ; the old
Fishmarket Close, ib. : Heriot's
mansion ib. . the Deemster's
house ib.; Bbrthwick's Close
ib. ; I k d Dune's house, i6. ; th;
old Assembly Rooms, ib. ; Miss
Nicky Mum 243 ; formalities
of the balls it: ladies' fashions
245; Bell': Wynd $6. . BIa&
Street and Hunter'; Squire, ib. ;
' Kennedy's Close, ib. ; Niddry's
Wynd, ib. ; Provost Nicol
Edwards' house, 245, 246, 247 :
Lockhart's Court, r6. ; St. M a j s
Chapel, lb. ; Masonic Lodge
meetings, ib. ; Lady Glenorchy,
ib. ; story of Lady Grange 248-
251; St. Cecilia Hall Z;I; its
old-fashioned concerts,'ib. ; the
belles of the eighteenth century,
ib. . the name Niddry, 252 ;
Diikson's and Cant's Closes, 253 ;
house of David Allan, zb. ; Rosehaugh's
Close, id. ; house of the
Abbots of hIelrase, ib. ; Sit
George Mackenzie of Rwhaugh,
254 ; Lady Anne Dick, lb. ; Lord
Strichen, ib.; the manners 01
17 0, ib. ; Provost Grieve, 255 ; J t o n Dhu, ib. ; Lad Lovat's
Land, ib. ; Walter Ehepman,
rimer, ib. ; Lady Lovat 257 ;
backfriars Wynd, 258 : Sir Wdrim
Stewart slain by Rothwell
259 ; escape of Archbisho;
Sharpe, rb . Cameronian meeting-
house, ' >b. ; house of the
Regent Mortan ib. : Catholic
chapels of the'eighteenth cen
tury, 261. Bishop Hay ib.
Baron Smi;h's chapel, 262'; Car
d i d Beaton's house 263; Its
historical association:, io. ; IU
ultimate occupants 264; the
United Industrial School, 265 ;
Toddricks Wynd, 2 6 6 ; Lord
Leven's house in Skinner'sClose,
267 ; the Scottish Mint, ib. ;
Argyle's lodging,a70; Dr.Cullen,
271 ; Elphinstone's Court, 272;
Lords Loughborough and Stonefield
z7r 273' Lord Selkirk 274'
Dr. kutierfoid, ib. ; house Af th;
Earls of Hyndford ib. ; the
three romps of MoAreith, 275;
Anne Countess of Balcarres, 276 ;
Souti Foulis' Close, ib. ; Fountain
Close. ib. ; Endmylie's Well
ib. ; house of Bailie Fullerton:
277; Koyal College of Physicians,
278 ; Tweeddale Close, ib. ; hollse
of the Marquis of Tweeddale, ib.;
the British Linen Company, 279 ;
murder of Begbie, 280; the
World's EndClose,z81; the Stanfield
tragedy, ib. : titled residents
in the old closes, 282
ligh Street, Portobello, 111. 152,
* I53
Till Mrs. the xulptor, 11. 131
-Iill!house'Field, Leith, 111. go, 273
lill Street, 11. 159, 165
lobart Lord 11. 373
logarih Gedrge W.S., 11. 26
7ogarth' The Scbttish I. 253
logg. J k e s , the EttrigkShepherd,
1. 7, 15. 339, 11. '27, 1409 142,
'7% '99, 111. 747 7 I 126, 1277 I79
Holderness Robert %arl of, 11. 39 ' Hole in the Wall" Inn, 11. 268
Holland John projector of the
Bank ;If Scotlkd, 11. 93,95
HoLstein Visit of the Duke of, to
Edinbhrgh I. III
Holy Cross, Abbey of the, 11. 288
Holy Cross, Kirk of the, 11. ~ o o
Holyrood Abbey, I. 19, m, 4 4 116,
139, 2f7.s 23p 11. 11, 42-60> 379;
its ongin, 1. 42, 43, 4; its endowments
11. 44, 46, 111. 49;
list of abbbts, I1.46-49,III. 41 ;
seal of the Abbey, 11. *46; its
relicsandrevenues, II.5o;church
of 11. * 5 6 ; nave of, 11. *57;
d&s;truction of, 11. 57, 58 : right
of sanctuary, 11. 60 ; Hollar's
print of, 11. *45 ; Gothic porch
and gatehouse 11. 11
Holy Rood Acd, The, 11. 239
H+rocd, Ancient chapel of the,
11. 239
Holyrood chapel, St. Giles's church.
Holyrood dairy 11. * 305
Holyrwd Foun$in,The, 11. g *SI
Holyrood House, I. 199 ; the &&I
Royal, 11. * 49
Holyroodhouse, Lord, I. go, 158,
zm. aza, 11. 49,111. zgg
Holyrood Palace, I. xi 6, 40, 42>
54 55, 58, 7% 791 90. '75,204, 11.
at, 11. 66-7'. 111. 4, 7 ; Charles
I. at, 11. 73; James Duke oi
York and Albany at, I. 335 11.
75, 111. 11; arrival of Pr'incc
Charles Edward at, I. 316; Comtc
d'Artois at, 11. 76, 78 ; isometric
projectionof the Palace, 11. 61
views of the Palace, 11. 68, * 6q
*72;modemviews, II.*73 *Bo
81 ; monuments, I. 196, zm: 238
the old Mint, I. 267 : sanctuaq
of, 11. 11, 281, 303 ; plan ofth:
sanctuary, 11. * 3 q ; Hollar:
print of, 11. ' 45
yard, I. 256
L 7 9 , 236, 354; Queen Maq
Holyrood Tennis Court, 111. 125
Home Earl of, 11. 31
Home: Lord, I. 40, 49,II. zzz, 111
Home, Sir John, I. 102
Home, Alexander Lord, Provost
Home Alexander Provost 11. z&
Home: George, Cierk of .%Lion, I
29. 134, 298
11. 279
zar
Home, Sir George, Lord Provost
Home ofthe Heugh, Patrick, III.3(
Home of Polwarth, Patrick, I1
Home of Wedderburn,David, 1.4, t:
111. 46
180. 111. 36
Iome, NinQn, the dominie, 111.156
Iome Lady I. a82 11. 31
iamb, John,'autho:of '' Douglas,"
11. 24-7 127.334 111. 45,21g,
24o-zp ; hisancestors, III. 240 ;
h~s death and burial-place, ib.
Iome Street, 11. zaz
iowerton the actor, I. 350
Iornildon'Hill (see Battles)
ioneyman, Bishop ofOrkney, 1.259
ioneyman, Sir William, Lord
Armadale, 1. 259
Iooly, Mount, I. 383
looped ladies, r. z++ 245
iope of Granton, imd Jwtice-
Clerk, 1. 159. 11. 159
lope, Right Hon. Charles, of the
Edinburgh Volunteers, 11. *I 7
mal 268, 372, 374, 111. 311 ; k
conduct as Lord Advocate, 11.
102 a03
lor, I. 36 , 111 77
maAsion of, 11.243
house of I. 240
{ope: %Alexander, Lord Rankeil-
<ope Sirlrchibald, 111. 270
4ope' Sir Thomas, I. 116, 11. 243;
<ope, John de, I. 94; supposcd
<ope Major-General, 11, 19
<ope' Profesar John 11. 293
lope' President 11. ;gs
4ope'of Carse, iI. 281
lope of Craighall, The family os
111.311.
111. 316
agriculturist, 11. 3;7
*ope of Craighall, Sir Thomas,
Hope of Rankeillor Thomas, the
Hope Dr. John, I. 3631*364. 111.161
Hope' Robert, physician, 11. zg8
Hope' Park, 11. 339,347, 348, W.
Kope Jark Chapel, 111. 51
Hope Park Congregational Church,
Rope Park Crescent, 11. 349
Hope Park Terrace 11. 3
Hope Park United Pregyterian
Church, 111. 51
Hope Street, 11. 130,165
Hope's Close, 1. 116
Hopetoun, Earl of, I. 238, 3
354 513 I!I. 54
111. 5'
111. 57
Hope Park En4 11. ~ 9 , 351, 35%
, 11.
38, 1% 171, 1%~ 34% IIp16rs
190, 323,362; houseof, I. 40, IL
26; monument to 11. 171 .
Hopetoun Fenciblei, 11. 236
Hopetoun House 111. 77
Hopetouu Laird'of 111. 57
Hopetoun'Rooms h. 158, 111. 78
Hopkins, Mrs. a&ess, 11. 24
Horn Charity,'The, I. 308
Horn Lane 111. 76
Horn Orde: The 111. IZZ
Horner, Frkcis,'I. 379, 11. 187,
Horner, Leonard, I. 165, 291, 379,
292, 29.52 347
111. 342,
Horseracing on Leith Sands, 111.
Horse Wynd, I. 267. 282, 11.27, 38,
Hos~italbfO&Mlessed Lady,I.po
Hospital of St. Thomas, 11. 39 47
Hospitallers of St. Anthony, L k h ,
Hotels, The street for, 11. 123
House of Correction, I. 301.302
House of Industry 111. 125
House in High &reet, with memorial
window (' Heave awa,
Lids, I'm no deidyet," I. z4oo,*24r
H o u ~ of the Kirk-of-Field, 111.
268-270
39 .& 255 256, 158, 274, 282
111. 216
4, 6, 7
Household garbage, The streets
formerly receptacles for 1. 192
Houses in the New Tom: Number
Houston, Archibald, Murder of, I.
Houston Lad 11. 331
Howe Sireet, fi. 1%
Howard, the philanthropist, I. 132,
Howf The Leith 111. 23r
Hugk Mill& (scs kfiller)
Hugh Miller Place, 111. 75
Human heads Exposure of 11.4
Humane smiity of Leith, ~ I I . a%
. - 48, !49
Of, 11. 175
'96
359
-
... 235, 236. Mylne's Square, 2 3 d z 3 8 : ~orld AI='s house, 237; thecountess ofSutherland and lady ...

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One of her chief intimates was the unfortunate
Lady Jane Douglas of Grantully, the heroine of
the long-contested Douglas cause. She
contemplated the approach of her own
death with perfect calmness, and in
anticipation of her coming demise had
all her grave-clothes ready, and the ,
turnpike stair whitewashed. When
asked by her only son, Archibald
(before mentioned), if she wished to
be put in the family burial vault at
Beaufort, in Kilmorack, she replied, I
Indeed, Archie, ye needna put your- '
sel' to any fash aboot me, for I
carena' though ye lay me aneath that ,
hearthstane."
She died in her house at the Wynd
head, in 1796, in the eighty-sixth
year of her age. The old Scottish
&ling-pin of her house door is now
preserved in the Museum of the '
Scottish Antiquarian Society.
Lovat, who died a Lieutenant-General
in 1782, was a man of irreproachable
character, who inherited nothing of
old Lovat's nature but a genius for
Her stepson, Sirnon, Master of TIRLISO-PIN, FKOM LADY
LOVAT'S HOUSE, BLACKFRIARS
WYND.
(From *hsco*tish M?,srum.)
service in America. The rapidity with which the
ranks of previous Highland regiments, raised by
making fine speeches. He raised the Fraset
Highlanders, or old 71st regiment, which was
disbanded in 1783, after a career of brilliant
the bloody brawl between the Earl of Bothwell
and Sir William Stewart of Monkton.
Between these two a quarrel had taken place in
him in 1757, were filled by Frasers,
so pleased George III., that on the
embodiment of the 71st he received
from the king a free grant of his
family estates of Lovat, which had
been forfeited by his father's attainder
after Culloden.
At the first muster of the 71st in
Glasgow, an old Highlander, who had
brought a son to enlist, and was looking
on, shook the general's hand with that
familiarity so common among clansmen,
and said, " Simon, you are a good
soldier, and speak like a man ! While
you live old Simon of Lovat will never
die "-alluding to his close resemblance
personally to his father, the
wily old lord of the memorable "Fortyfive."
Blackfriars Wynd, which has now
become a broad street, has many
a stirring memory of the great and
powerful, who dwelt there in ages
past j hence it is that Sir Alexander
Boswell wrote-
" What recollections rush upon my mind,
Of Lady Stair's Close and BZackfk'ws Wynd!
There once our nobles, and here judges dwelt ."
CHAPTER XXXI.
ALLEYS OF THE HIGH STREET (continued:.
Blackfriars Wynd-The Grant of Alexander 11.-Bothwell slays S'r Williiam Stem-Escape of Archbishop Shar&Cameronian Meeting
house-The House of the Regent Morton-Catholic Chapels of the Eighteenth Century-Bishop Hay-" No Popery *' Riots-Baron
Smith's Chapel-Scottish Episcopalians -House of the Prince of Orkney- Magnificence of Earl William Sinclair-Cardinal Beaton's
House-The Cardinal's Armorial Bearing-Historical Associations of his HouscIts Ultimate Occupants-The United Industrial School.
A BROAD $end (AngZic6 archway), leading through
the successor to the tenement in which Lady Lovat
dwelt, gave access to the Blackfriars Wynd, which,
without doubt, was one of the largest, most important,
and ancient of the thoroughfares diverging
from the High Street, and which of old was named
the Preaching Friar's Vennel, as it led towards the
Dominican monastery, or Black Friary, founded
by Alexander II., in 1230, on the high ground
beyond the Cowgate, near where the Old Infirmary
stands. The king gave the friars-among
whom he resided for some time-with many other
endowments, a grant of the whole ground now
occupied by the old wynd and modern street, to
erect houses, and for five centuries these edifices ... of her chief intimates was the unfortunate Lady Jane Douglas of Grantully, the heroine of the long-contested ...

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CON TENTS. V
CHAPTER XIII.
THE DISTRICT OF RESTALRIG.
PAGE
Abbey Hill-Baron Norton-Alex. Campbell and 'I Albjm's Anthology "--Comely Gardens-Easter Road-St. Margaret's Wellxhurch
and Legend of St. Tnduana-Made Collegiate bv James 111.-The Mausoleum-Old Barons of Restalrig-The Logans, &c-
Conflict of Black Saturday-Residents of Note-First Balloon in Britain-Rector Adams-The Nisbeb of Craigantinnie and Dean
-The Millers-The Craixantinnie Tomb and Marbles-The Marionville Tragedy-The Hamlet of Jock's Lodge-Mail-bag Robberies
in Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries-Piemhill House and Barracks. . . . . . . . . . . . . I 27
CHAPTER XIV.
PORTOBELLO.
Portobell~The Site before the Houses-The Figgate Muir--ctone Coffiqs-A Meeting with Cramwell-A Curious Race-Portobello Hut-
Robbers-William Jamieson's Feuing-Sir W. Scott and "The Lay "-Portobello Tower-Review of Yeomanry and Highlanders-
Hugh Miller-David Lamg-Joppa-Magdalene Bridge-Rrunstane House . . . . . . . . . . . . I43
CHAPTER XV.
LEITH WALK.
A Pathway in the 15th Century probable-Genera1 Leslie's Trenches-Repulse of Cramwell-The Rood Chapel-Old Leith Stazes-Propsal
for Lighting the Walk-The Gallow Lea-Executions there-The Minister of Spott- Five Witches-Five Covenanters-The Story of
their Skulls-The Murder of Lady Baillie-The Effigies of "Johnnie Wilkes" . . . . . . . . , . . 150
CHAPTER XVI.
LEITH WALK (conchfed).
East Side-Captain Haldane of the Tabernacle-New Road to Haddington -Windsor Street-Mrs H. Siddons -Lovers' Loan-Greenside
House-Andrew Macdonald. the Author of" Vimonda "-West Side-Sir J. Whiteford of that Ilk-Gayfield House-Colonel Crichton
--Prince Leopold-Lady Maxwell-Lady Nairne-SFr;ngfield-McCulloch of Ardwell and Samuel Foote . . . . . ' 157
CHAPTER XVII.
LEITH-HISTORICAL SURVEY.
Origin of the Name-Boundaries of South and North Leith-Links of North Leith-The Town frrst mentioned in History--King Robert's
Charter-Superiority of the Logans and Magistrates of Edinburgh-Abbot Ballantyne's Bridge and Chapel-Newhaven given to
Edinburgh by Jam- 1V.-The Port of 153c-The Town Burned by the English . . . . , . . . . . - . 164
CHAPTER XVIII.
LEITH-HISTORICAL SURVEY (continued).
The Great Siege-Arrival of the French-The Fortifications-Re-capture of Inchkeith-The Town Invested-Arrival of the English Fleet
and Army-Skirmishes-Opening of the BatteriesFailure of the Great Assault-Queen Regent's Death-Treaty of Peace-Relics of
thesiege . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .r7o
CHAPTER XIX.
LEITH-HISTORICAL SURVEY (catinued).
rhc Fortifications demolished-Landing of Queen Mary-Leith Mortgaged-Edinburgh takes Military Pasession of it-A Convention-A
Plague-James VI. Departs and Returns -Witches-Cowrie Con%pkacy-The Union Jack-Pirates-Taylor the Water Poet-
A Fight in the Harbour-Death of Jamer VI. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . , 178 ... TENTS. V CHAPTER XIII. THE DISTRICT OF RESTALRIG. PAGE Abbey Hill-Baron Norton-Alex. Campbell and 'I ...

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iv OLD AND NEW EDINBURGH. -
CHAPTER VI.
THE VALLEY OF THE WATER OF LEITH.
PAGE
Lady Sinclair of Dunbeath-Bell's Mills-Water of Leith Village-Mill at the Dean-Tolbwth there-Old Houses-The Dean and Poultry
-Lands thereof-The Nisbet Family-A Legend-The Dean Village-Belgrave Crescent-The Parish Church-Stewart's Hospital-
Orphan Hospita-John Watson's Hospital-The Dean Cemetery-Notable Interments there . . . . . . . . . 62
CHAPTER VII.
VALLEY OF THE WATER OF LEITH (continued).
The Dean Bridge-Landslips at Stockbridge-Stone Coffins-Floods in the Leith-Population in ~74z-St. Bernard's Estate-Rods Tower-
" Chritopher North " in Aune Street-De Quincey there-St. Bernard's Well-Cave at Randolph Cliff-Veitchs Square-Churches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . in the Locality-Sir Henry Raeburn-Old Deanhaugh House ' 70
CHAPTER VIII.
VALLEY OF THE WATER OF LEITH (concluded).
E.niiuent Men connected with Stockbridge-David Robert7. RA.--K Macleay, R.S.A.-James Browne, LL.D.-James Hogg-Sir J. Y.
Simpson, Bart. -Leitch Ritchie-General Mitchell-G. R. Luke-Comely Bank-Fettes Collegc--Craigleith Quarry-Groat Hall-Silver
Mills-St. Stephen's Church-The Brothers Lauder-Jam- Drummond, R.S.A.-Deaf and -Dumb Institution-Dean Bank Institution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . -The Edinburgh Academy -78
CHAPTER IX.
CANONMILLS AND INVERLEITH.
CanonmillgThe Loch-Riots of 1784-The Gymnasium-Tanfield HalL-German Church-Zoological Gardens-Powder Hall-Rosebank
Cemetery-Red BraesThe Crawfords of Jordanhill-Bonnington-Bishop Keith-The Sugar Refinery-Pilrig-The Balfour Family-
Inverleith-Ancient ProprietorsThe Touris-The Rocheids-Old Lady Inverleith-General Crocket-Royal Botanical GardensMr.
JamesMacNab. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
CHAPTER X.
THE WESTERN NEW TOWN.
Coltbridge-Roseburn House-Traditions of it-Murrayfield-Lord Henderland-Beechwood-General Leslie-The Dundaxs-Ravelston-
The Foulises and Keiths-Craigcrook-Its fint Proprietors-A Fearful Tragedy-Archibald Constable-Lord Jeffrey-Davidson's
Mains-LauristonCastle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .IOZ
CHAPTER XI,
C O R S T O R P H I N E .
ContorphintSupposed Origin of the N a m t T h e Hill-James VI. hunting there-The Cross-The Spa-The Dicks of Braid and con^
phine-" Contorphine Cream '%onvalerent House-A Wraith-The Original Chapel-The Collegiate Church-Its Provosts-Its
Old Tombs-The Castle and Loch of Cohtorphine-The Forrester Family . . . . . . . . . . . . . I 12
CHAPTER XII.
rHE OLD EDINBURGH CLUBS.
Of Old Clubs, and some Notabilia of Edinburgh Life in the Last Century-The Horn Order-The Union Club-Impious Clubs--Assembly
of Birds-The Sweating Club-The Revolution and certain other Clubs-The Beggars' Benison -The Capillaim Club-The Industrious
Company-The Wig, Exulapian, Boar, Country Dinner, The East India, Cape, Spendthrift, Pious, Antemanurn, Six Feet, and
Shakespeare Clubs-Oyster Cellars-" Frolics "-The "Duke of Edinburgh" . . . . . . . . . . . . 122 ... OLD AND NEW EDINBURGH. - CHAPTER VI. THE VALLEY OF THE WATER OF LEITH. PAGE Lady Sinclair of Dunbeath-Bell's ...

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them were captured, among others old McLean,
who made a desperate resistance in the West Port
with a musket and bayonet. Many who rolled
down the rocks to the roadway beneath were
severely injured, and taken by the City Guard. A
sentinel was bound hand and foot and thrown into
Macintosh, of Borlum, in his 80th
captivity of fifteen years, for participation
rising of 1715; and for twelve months,
there were confined in a small, horrid, unhealthy
chamber above the portcullis,
many a year as '' the black hole " of
south) where he confessed the whole plot ; the
corporal was mercilessly flogged ; and Sergeant
Ahslie was hanged over the postern gate. Colonel
Stuart was dismissed ; and Brigadier Grant, whose
regiment was added to the garrison, was appointed
temporary governor.
From this period, with the exception of a species
of blockade in 1745, to be related in its place,
the history of the Castle is as uneventful as that of
the Tower of London, save a visit paid to it in t+
time of George I., by Yussuf Juniati, General and
Governor of Damascus.
Many unfortunate Jacobites have suffered most
protracted periods of imprisonment within its walls.
' with her daughters, the Ladies Mary
who were brought in by an escort of twenty
under a ruffianly quartermaster, who
with every indignity, even to tearing weddingring
from Lady Strathallan's finger, and
daughters of their clothes. During the
these noble ladies were in that noisome
the gate, they were without female attendance,
under the almost hourly surveillance sergeants
of the guard. The husband of
was slain at the head of his men on
Culloden, where the Jacobite clans were
by neither skill nor valour, but the sheer
numbers and starvation. ... were captured, among others old McLean, who made a desperate resistance in the West Port with a musket and ...

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iv OLD AND NEW EDINBURGH.
CHAPTER VII.
PAGE
EDINBURGH CASTLE (conclzded). .
The Torture of Neville Payne-Jacobite Plots-Entombing the Regalia-Project for Surprising the Foltress-Right of Sanctuary Abolished
-Lord Drummond's Plot-Some Jacobite Prisoners-'' Rebel Ladies"- James Macgregor-The Castle Vaults-Attempts at Escape-
Fears as to the Destruction of the Crown, Sword, and Sceptre-Crown-room opened in 1794-Again in 1817, and the Regalia brought
forth-Mons Megseneml Description of the whole Castle . . . : . . . . . . . . . . . . 66
CHAPTER VIII. .
THE CA~STLE HILL.
Doyglas-Castle Hill Promenade-Question as to the Proprietary of the Esplanade and Castle Hill . . . . . . . .
The Esplanade or Castle Hill-The Castle Banks-The Celtic Crosses-The Secret Passage and Well house Tower-The Church on the Castle
Hill-The Reservoir-The House of Allan Ramsay-Executions for Treason, Sorcery, &.-The Master of Forbes-Lady Jane
79
CHAPTER IX.
THE CASTLE HILL (conczuded).
'Dr. Guthrie's O~pinal Ragged School-Old Homes in the Street of the Castle Hill-Duke of Gordon's House, Blair's Close-Webster's Close
-Dr. Alex. Webster-Eoswell s Court-Hyndford House-Assembly Hdl-Houses of the Marquis of Argyle, Sir Andrew Kennedy, the
Earl of Cassillis, the Laud of cockpen--Lord Semple's House-Lord Semple-Fah of Mary of Guise-Its Fate . . . . 87
CHAPTER X.
T H E LAWNMARKET.
The Lawnmarket-RiSjt-The Weigh-houstMajor Somerville and captain Crawford-AndeMn's Pills-Myhe's Court-James's Gourt-Sir
John Lauder-Sir Islay Campbell-David Hume--" Cprsica" Boswell-Dr. Johnso-Dr. Blki-" Gladstone's Land "-A Fire in 1771 94
CHAPTER XI.
THE LAWNMARKET (continued).
Lady Stair's Close-Gray of Pittendrum-"Aunt Margaret's M rror"-The Marshal Earl and Countess of Stair-Miss Feme-Sir Richard
Steel-Martha Countess of Kincardine-Bums's Room in Barfer's C1o.e-The Eridges' Shop ih Bank Stxet-Bailie MacMorran's
Story-Sir Francis Grant of Cullen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I02
CHAPTER XII.
THE LAWNMARKET' (continued).
The Story of Deacon Brodie-His Career of Guilt-Hanged on his own Gibbet-Mauchine's Close, Robet? Gourlay's Hoiise and the other
Old Houses therein-The Rank of Scotland, 16~5-Assassination of Sir Gorge hckhart-Taken Red Hand-Punishment of Chiesly I12
CHAPTER XIII.
THE LAWNMARKET (concluded).
Gosford's Close- The Town House of the Abbot of Cambu~kcnncth-Tennant's House-Mansion of the Hays-Liberton's Wynd-Johnnie
Dowie's Tavern-Burns a d His Songs-The Place of Execution-Birthplace of "The Man of Feeling"-The Mirror Club-
Forrester's Wynd-The Heather Stacks in the Houses-Peter Williamn-Beith's Wynd-Habits of the Lawnmarket Woollen
Traders-"Lawnmarket Gazettes "-Melbourne Place-The County Hall-The Signet and Advocates' Libraries . . . . . I I8
CHAPTER XIV.
T H E TOLBOOTH.
Memori-1s of the Heart of Midlothian, or Old Tolbooth-Sir Walter Scott's Description-The Early Tolhth-The "Robin Hod"
Disturbances-Noted Prison-Entries from the Records--Lord Burleigh's Attempts at Escape-The Porteous Mob-The Stories
of Katherine Nairne and of Jam- Hay-The Town Guard-The Royal Bedesmen . . . . . . . . . . . . 12; ... OLD AND NEW EDINBURGH. CHAPTER VII. PAGE EDINBURGH CASTLE (conclzded). . The Torture of Neville ...

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304 OLD AND NEW EDINBURGH. [Newhaven.
~~~~~ ~
being inadmissible from the broad belt which supports
the creel, that is, fish-basket, crossing the
forehead. A sort of woollen pea-jacket with vast
amplitude of skirt, conceals the upper part of the
person, relieved at the throat by a liberal display
of handkerchief The under part of the figure is
endued upon a masculine but handsome form, notwithstanding
the slight stoop forward, which is
almost uniformly contracted-fancy the firm and
elastic step, the toes slightly inclined inwardsand
the ruddy complexion resulting from hard
exercise, and you have the beau idiab of fishwives."
REV. DR. FAIRBAIRN. (A&r a Photagrajh 6y John Mojat, Elnburgh.)
invested with a voluminous quantity of petticoat,
of substantial material and gaudy colour, generally
yellow with stripes, so made as to admit of a very
free inspection of the ankle, and worn in such
numbers that the bare mention of them would be
enough to make a fine lady faint. 'One half of
these ample garments is gathered over the haunches,
puffing out the figure in an unusual and uncouth
manner. White worsted stockings and stout shoes
complete the picture. Imagine these investments
The unmarried girls when pursuing the trade of
hawking fish wear the same costume, save that
their heads are always bare.
The Buckhaven fisher people on the opposite
coast are said to derive their origin from Flemish
settlers, and yet adhere to the wide trousers and
long boots of the Netherlands; but there is no
reason for supposing that those of Newhaven or
Fisherrow are descended from any other than a
good old Scottish stock. ... OLD AND NEW EDINBURGH. [Newhaven. ~~~~~ ~ being inadmissible from the broad belt which supports the creel, ...

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CONTENTS. vii
. CHAPTER XXXI.
PAGE ALLEYS OF THE HIGH STREET (continued).
Blackfriars Wynd-The Grant of Alexander 11.-Bothwell slays Si Williiam Stewar-Escape of Archbishop Sharpe-Cameronian Meetinghouse-
The House of the Regent Morton-Catholic Chapels of the Eighteenth Century-Bishop Hay-"No Popery" Riots-
Baron Smith's Chapel-Scottish Episcopalians-House of the Prince of Orkney- Magnificence of Earl Wdliam Sinclair-Cfudinnl
Beaton's House-The Cardinal's Armorial Bearings-Historical Assw$arions of his House-Its Ultimate Occupants-The United
IndusWSchool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 . 258
CHAPTER XXXII.
ALLEYS OF THE HIGH STREET (continued).
Toddrick's Wynd-Banquet to the Danish Ambassador and Nobles-Lord Leven's House in Skinner's Close-The Fim Mint Houses-
The Mint-Scottish Coin-Mode of its Manufacture-Argyle's Lodging-Dr. Cullen-Elphinstone's Court--Lords Laughborough and
Stonefield-Lard Selkirk-Dr. Rutherford, the Inventor of Gas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 266
CHAPTER XXXIII.
ALLEYS OF THE HIGH STREET (concluded).
The House of the Earls of Hyndford-The l'hree Rornps'of Monreith-Anne, Conntess of Balcarris-South Foulid Qosc-The "Endnrylie's
Well"-Fountain Close-The House of Bailie Fullerton-Purchase of Property for the Royal College of Physicians-New
Episcopal Chapel-Tweeddale Close-The House of the Marquis of Tweeddale-Kise of the British Linen Compmy-The Mysterious
Murder of Begbie-The World's End Close-The Stanfield Tragedy-Titled Raidenters in Old Town C h e s . . . . . . 274
CHAPTER XXXIV.
NEW STREETS WITHIN THE AREA OF THE FLODDEN WALL.
Lord Cockburn Street-Lord Cockhnrn-The Scobman Newspaper-Charles Mackren and Alexander Kussel-The Queen's Edinburgh
Rifle Brigade-St. Giles Street-Sketch of the Rise of Journalism in Edinburgh-The Edidurgk Couramt-The Dai& Review-
Jeffrey Street-New Trinity College Church . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 282
CHAPTER XXXV.
NEW STREETS WITHIN THE AREA OF THE FLODDEN WALL (ctmcluded).
Victoria Street and Terrace-The I n d i Buildings-Mechanics' Subscription Libraq-Gwrge IV. Bridge-St. Augustine's Church-Martyrs'
Church-Chamber of the Hqhlandaud Apicnltural Sodety--SheriffCourt Bddbgs a d sohitors' Hall-Johnstone Terace-St. John's
Free Church-The Church of Scotland Training Ihllege . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 291
CHAPTER XXXVI.
ST. MARY'S WYND.
St. Mary's Wynd and Street-Sir David Annand-St. Mary's Cisterdan Conrentand Hospital-Bothwell's Brawl in I+-T?I~ Caagate Port-
Rag Fair-The Ladies of Traquair-Ramsay's "White Horsc '' Inn-Pasqnale de Paoli-Ramsay Retires with a Fortune-Boyd's
'' White Horse" Inn-Patronised by Dr. Johnson-Improvements in the Wynd-Catholic Institute-The Oldest Doorhead in the City 297
CHAPTER XXXVII.
LEITH WYND.
Leith Wynd-Our Lady's Hospital-Paul's Work-The Wall of 1540-ItO Fall in 1854-The "Happy Land"-Mary of Gueldns-Trinity
College Church-Some Particulars of its Charter-Interior View-Decorations-Enlargement of the Establishment-Privileges of
its Ancient Officers-The Duchess of Lennox-Lady Jane Hamilton-Curious Remains-Trinity Hospital-Sir Simon Preston's
" Public Spirit "-Become a Corporation Charity-Description of Buildings-Provision for the Inmates--Lord Cockburn's Female
Pdon-Demolition of the Hospital-Other Charities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 300
CHAPTER XXXVJII.
T H E W E S T B O W .
%e West Bow-Quaint Ciaracter of its Houses-Its Modern Aspact-Houses of the Tunplar Knighrs-The Bowfoot Well-The Bow
Port-The Bow-head-Major Weir's Land-History of Major Thomas WeL-Personal Appearance-His Powdd Prayers-The 'I Holy
Sisters "-The Bowhead Saints-Weir's Reputed Compact with the Devil-Sick-bed Confession-ht-Search of his House--Prison
Confession-Trial of Him and His Sister Grizel-Execution-What was Weir ?-His Sister undoubtedly Mad-Terrible Reputation of
the Houw-Untenanted for upwards of a Century-Patullo's Experience of a Cheap Lodging-Weir's Land Improd Out of Existence
-Hall of the Knights of St. John-A Mysterious House-Samerville Mmsion-The Assembly Rooms--Opposed by the Bigotry of
the Times-The LPdy-Directress-Curioua Regulations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .309 ... vii . CHAPTER XXXI. PAGE ALLEYS OF THE HIGH STREET (continued). Blackfriars Wynd-The Grant of ...

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224 OLD AND NEW EDINBURGH. [Weat Port.
~~ ~
the dreadful Irish murders in 1828; but its repute
was very different in the last century. Thus we find
in the Edinburgh papers for 1764, advertisedas to let
there, " the new-built house, beautifully situated on
the high ground south of the Portsburgh, commanding
an extensive prospect every way, with genteel
furniture, perfectly clean, presently possessed by
John Macdonald, Esq., of Lairgie," with chaisehouse
and stabling.
remained intact up till SO recently as 1881, while
around the large cupola and above the chief seat
were panels of coats of arms of the various city
crafts, and that also of the Portsburgh-all done in
oil, and in perfect condition. This court-room was
situated in the West Port. In its last days it was
rented from the city chamberlain by the deacons'
court of Dr. Chalmers' Territorial Church. Mission
meetings and Sunday-schools were held in it, but
OLD HOUSES IN THE WEST PORT, NEAR THE HAUNTS OF BURKE AND HARE, 1869
(Fsmn a Drawing Sy Mn. J. Stnvari Smith.)
Near the Territorial Church is a door above
which are the arms of the Cordiners of the Portsburgh-
a cordiner's cutting-knife crowned, within a
circle, with the heads of two winged cherubim, and
the words of Psalm 133, versified :-
" Behold how good a thing it is,
And how becoming well,
Together such as brethren are,
In unity to dwell.
I 696. "
One of the most complete of the few rare relics
of the City's old municipal institutions was the
court-room where the bailies of the ancient
Portsburgh discharged their official duties. The
bailies' bench, seats, and other court-room fittings
the site upon &hich it was built was sold by
roup for city improvements.
In the middle of the West Port, immediately
opposite the Chalmers Territorial Free Church
and Schools, and running due north, is a narrow
alley, called the Chapel Wynd. Heye, at the foot
thereof, stood in ancient times a chapel dedicated
to the Virgin Mary, some remains of which were
visible in the time of Maitland about 1750. Near
it is another alley-probably an access to itnamed
the Lady Wynd. Between this chapel and
the Castle Rock there exists, in name chiefly, an
ancient appendage of the royal palace in the
fortress-the king's stables, " although no hoof of
the royal stud has been there for well-nigh three
I ... OLD AND NEW EDINBURGH. [Weat Port. ~~ ~ the dreadful Irish murders in 1828; but its repute was very ...

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men of rank, another plot to storm it, at a time
when its garrison was the nsth, or old regiment of
Edinburgh, was formed by Lord John Drummond,
son of the Earl of Perth, with eighty men, mostly
Highlanders, and all of resolute courage. All these
-among whom was a Captain McLean, who had
lost a leg at Killiecrankie, and an Ensign Arthur,
late of the Scots Guards-were promised commissions
under King James, and IOO guineas each, if
ROYAL LODGING AND HALF-MOON BATTERY.
when the plot was marred by-a lady !
In the exultation he felt at the approaching
capture, and the hope he had of lighting the beacon
which was to announce to Fife and the far north
that the Castle was won, Ensign Arthur unfolded
the scheme to his brother, a physician in the city,
who volunteered for the enterprise, but most prudently
told his wife of it, and she, alarmed for his
safety, at once gave information to the Lord Justice
the event succeeded ; and at that crisis-when Mar
was about to fight the battle of Sheriffmuir-it
might have put him in possession of all Scotland.
Drummond contrived to suborn four of the garrison
-a sergeant, Ainslie, to whom he promised a
lieutenancy, a corporal, who was to be made an
ensign, and two privates, who got bribes in money.
On the night of the 8th September, when the
troops marched from the city to fight the Earl of
Mar, the attempt was made. The chosen time,
near twelve o'clock, was dark and stormy, and the
ilrodlcs operandi was to be by escalading the western
walls, near the ancient arched postern. A ladder,
equipped with great hooks to fix it to the cope of
the bastion, and calculated to admit four men
Clerk, Sir Adam Cockburn of Ormiston, who instantly
put himself in communication with Colonel
Stuart. Thus, by the time the conspirators were
at the foot of the wall the whole garrison was
under arms, the sentinels were doubled, and the
ramparts patrolled.
The first party of forty men, led by the resolute
Lord Drummond and the wooden-legged McLean,
had reached the foot of the wall unseen ; already
the ladder had been secured by Sergeant Ainslie,
and the escalade was in the act of ascending, with
pistols in their girdles and swords in their teeth,
when a Lieutenant Lindesay passed with his patrol,
and instantly gave an alarm I The ladder and all
on it fell heavily on the rocks below. A sentinel ... of rank, another plot to storm it, at a time when its garrison was the nsth, or old regiment of Edinburgh, ...

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OLD -4NU NEW EDINBURGH. ... v11t
CHAPTER XXXIV.
INCHKEITH.
PAGE
The Defences of Leith-Inchkeith Forts-%. Serf-The Pest-stricken in 1497-Experiment of James lV.-The Old Fort-Johnson and
Boswell-The New Chanuel -Colonel Moggridge's P l a n j T h e 'I hree New Forts-Magazines and Barracks-The Lighthouse . . 290
CHAPTER XXXV.
NEWHAVEN.
Cobbett on Edinburgh-Jam- IV.'s Dockyard -His Gift of Newhaven to Edinburgh-The GYCQ~ Michapl-Embarkation of Mary of Guise
-Woc.ks at Newhaven in the Sixteenth Century-The Links-Viscount Newhaven-The Feud with Prestonpans-The Sea Fencibles
--Chain Pier-Dr. Fairhirn-The E ishwives-Superstitions . , . . . , . . . . . . . . . 295
CHAPTER XXXVI.
WARDIE, TRINITY, AND GRANTO~.
Wardie Muir-Human Remqins Found-Bangholm Bower and Trinity Lodge-Christ Church, Trinity-Free Church, Granton Road-Pilton
-Royston-Caroline Park-Granton-The Piers and Harhuun-Morton's Patent Slip , . . . . . . , . . 306
CHAPTER XXXVII.
THE ENVIRONS OF EDINBURGH.
Cramond-Origin of the Name-Cramond of that Ilk-Ancient Charters - Inchmickery-Lord Cramond--Bdrnton -Goer and its Proprietors-
Saughton Hall--Riccarton . . . . . . , . . . . . . . , . . . , . . 3'4
CH AI'TE R XXXVI 11.
THE EXVIRONS OF EDINBURGH (confinzed).
Colinton-Ancient Name and Church-Redhall-The Family of Foulis-Dreghom -The Pentlands-View from Tqhin-Comiston-Slateford-
Grnysmill-Liberton -The Mill at Nether Liberton-Liberton Tower-The Chiirch-The Balm Well of St. Katherine-Grace
Mount-The Wauchopes of Niddrie-Niddrie House-St Katherine's-The Kaime-Mr. Clement Little-Lady Little 01 Lihrton . 322
CHAPTER XXXIX.
THE EXVIRONS OF EDINBURGH (continued).
Cnrrie-Origin of the Name-Roman Camps-The Old Church and Temple Lands-Lennox Tower-Curriehill Castle and the Skenes-
Scott of Malleny-James Andelson, LL.D.--"Camp Meg" and her Story . . . . . . . . . . , . 130
CHAPTER XL.
THE ENVIRONS OF EDIXBURGH (coalinued).
The Inch House-The WinramcEdmonstone and the Edmon.;tones of ttat Ilk-Witches-Woolmet-The Stenhouse-Moredun-The
' .338 Stewarts of Goodtrees-The Buckstane-Burdiehoux-Its Limekilns and Fossils . . . . , I . . . , . ... -4NU NEW EDINBURGH. ... v11t CHAPTER XXXIV. INCHKEITH. PAGE The Defences of Leith-Inchkeith Forts-%. ...

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OLD -4NU NEW EDINBURGH. ... v11t
CHAPTER XXXIV.
INCHKEITH.
PAGE
The Defences of Leith-Inchkeith Forts-%. Serf-The Pest-stricken in 1497-Experiment of James lV.-The Old Fort-Johnson and
Boswell-The New Chanuel -Colonel Moggridge's P l a n j T h e 'I hree New Forts-Magazines and Barracks-The Lighthouse . . 290
CHAPTER XXXV.
NEWHAVEN.
Cobbett on Edinburgh-Jam- IV.'s Dockyard -His Gift of Newhaven to Edinburgh-The GYCQ~ Michapl-Embarkation of Mary of Guise
-Woc.ks at Newhaven in the Sixteenth Century-The Links-Viscount Newhaven-The Feud with Prestonpans-The Sea Fencibles
--Chain Pier-Dr. Fairhirn-The E ishwives-Superstitions . , . . . , . . . . . . . . . 295
CHAPTER XXXVI.
WARDIE, TRINITY, AND GRANTO~.
Wardie Muir-Human Remqins Found-Bangholm Bower and Trinity Lodge-Christ Church, Trinity-Free Church, Granton Road-Pilton
-Royston-Caroline Park-Granton-The Piers and Harhuun-Morton's Patent Slip , . . . . . . , . . 306
CHAPTER XXXVII.
THE ENVIRONS OF EDINBURGH.
Cramond-Origin of the Name-Cramond of that Ilk-Ancient Charters - Inchmickery-Lord Cramond--Bdrnton -Goer and its Proprietors-
Saughton Hall--Riccarton . . . . . . , . . . . . . . , . . . , . . 3'4
CH AI'TE R XXXVI 11.
THE EXVIRONS OF EDINBURGH (confinzed).
Colinton-Ancient Name and Church-Redhall-The Family of Foulis-Dreghom -The Pentlands-View from Tqhin-Comiston-Slateford-
Grnysmill-Liberton -The Mill at Nether Liberton-Liberton Tower-The Chiirch-The Balm Well of St. Katherine-Grace
Mount-The Wauchopes of Niddrie-Niddrie House-St Katherine's-The Kaime-Mr. Clement Little-Lady Little 01 Lihrton . 322
CHAPTER XXXIX.
THE EXVIRONS OF EDINBURGH (continued).
Cnrrie-Origin of the Name-Roman Camps-The Old Church and Temple Lands-Lennox Tower-Curriehill Castle and the Skenes-
Scott of Malleny-James Andelson, LL.D.--"Camp Meg" and her Story . . . . . . . . . . , . 130
CHAPTER XL.
THE ENVIRONS OF EDIXBURGH (coalinued).
The Inch House-The WinramcEdmonstone and the Edmon.;tones of ttat Ilk-Witches-Woolmet-The Stenhouse-Moredun-The
' .338 Stewarts of Goodtrees-The Buckstane-Burdiehoux-Its Limekilns and Fossils . . . . , I . . . , . ... -4NU NEW EDINBURGH. ... v11t CHAPTER XXXIV. INCHKEITH. PAGE The Defences of Leith-Inchkeith Forts-%. ...

Vol. 6  p. 398 (Rel. 0.36)

OLD -4NU NEW EDINBURGH. ... v11t
CHAPTER XXXIV.
INCHKEITH.
PAGE
The Defences of Leith-Inchkeith Forts-%. Serf-The Pest-stricken in 1497-Experiment of James lV.-The Old Fort-Johnson and
Boswell-The New Chanuel -Colonel Moggridge's P l a n j T h e 'I hree New Forts-Magazines and Barracks-The Lighthouse . . 290
CHAPTER XXXV.
NEWHAVEN.
Cobbett on Edinburgh-Jam- IV.'s Dockyard -His Gift of Newhaven to Edinburgh-The GYCQ~ Michapl-Embarkation of Mary of Guise
-Woc.ks at Newhaven in the Sixteenth Century-The Links-Viscount Newhaven-The Feud with Prestonpans-The Sea Fencibles
--Chain Pier-Dr. Fairhirn-The E ishwives-Superstitions . , . . . , . . . . . . . . . 295
CHAPTER XXXVI.
WARDIE, TRINITY, AND GRANTO~.
Wardie Muir-Human Remqins Found-Bangholm Bower and Trinity Lodge-Christ Church, Trinity-Free Church, Granton Road-Pilton
-Royston-Caroline Park-Granton-The Piers and Harhuun-Morton's Patent Slip , . . . . . . , . . 306
CHAPTER XXXVII.
THE ENVIRONS OF EDINBURGH.
Cramond-Origin of the Name-Cramond of that Ilk-Ancient Charters - Inchmickery-Lord Cramond--Bdrnton -Goer and its Proprietors-
Saughton Hall--Riccarton . . . . . . , . . . . . . . , . . . , . . 3'4
CH AI'TE R XXXVI 11.
THE EXVIRONS OF EDINBURGH (confinzed).
Colinton-Ancient Name and Church-Redhall-The Family of Foulis-Dreghom -The Pentlands-View from Tqhin-Comiston-Slateford-
Grnysmill-Liberton -The Mill at Nether Liberton-Liberton Tower-The Chiirch-The Balm Well of St. Katherine-Grace
Mount-The Wauchopes of Niddrie-Niddrie House-St Katherine's-The Kaime-Mr. Clement Little-Lady Little 01 Lihrton . 322
CHAPTER XXXIX.
THE EXVIRONS OF EDINBURGH (continued).
Cnrrie-Origin of the Name-Roman Camps-The Old Church and Temple Lands-Lennox Tower-Curriehill Castle and the Skenes-
Scott of Malleny-James Andelson, LL.D.--"Camp Meg" and her Story . . . . . . . . . . , . 130
CHAPTER XL.
THE ENVIRONS OF EDIXBURGH (coalinued).
The Inch House-The WinramcEdmonstone and the Edmon.;tones of ttat Ilk-Witches-Woolmet-The Stenhouse-Moredun-The
' .338 Stewarts of Goodtrees-The Buckstane-Burdiehoux-Its Limekilns and Fossils . . . . , I . . . , . ... -4NU NEW EDINBURGH. ... v11t CHAPTER XXXIV. INCHKEITH. PAGE The Defences of Leith-Inchkeith Forts-%. ...

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George Street.] THE BLACKWOODS. I39
CHAP,TER XIX.
GEORGE STREET.
Major Andrew Faser-The Father of Miss Femer-Grant of Kilgraston-William Blackwoad and his Magazine-The Mother of Sir Waltn
Scott-Sir John Hay, Banker-Colquhoun of Killermont-Mrs. Murray of Henderland-The Houses of Sir J. W. Gomon, Sir Jam-
Hall. and Sir John Sinclair of Ulbster-St. Andrew's Church-Scene of the Disruption-Physicians' Hall-Glance at the Histcry of thecollege
of Physicians-Sold and Removed-The Commercial Bank-Its Constitution-Assembly Rooms-Rules of 17+Banquet to Black
Watch-" The Author of Waverley"-The Music Hall-The New Union Bank-Its Formation, &c.-The Mlasonic Hall-Watsoa'E
Pictureof Bums-Statues of George IV., Pitt, and Chalmers. .
PREVIOUS to the brilliant streets and squares
erected in the northern and western portions of
new Edinburgh, George Street was said to have no
rival in the world ; and even yet, after having undergone
many changes, for combined length, space,
uniformity, and magnificence of vista, whether
viewed from the east or west, it may well be
pronounced unparalleled. Straight as an arrow
flies, it is like its sister streets, but is 1x5 feet
broad. Here a great fossil tree was found in 1852.
A portion of the street on the south side, near
the west end, long bore the name of the Tontine,
and owing to some legal dispute, which left the
houses there mfinished, they were occupied as
infantry barracks during the war with France.
Nos. 3 and 5 (the latter once the residence of
Major Andrew Fraser and cf William Creech the
eminent bookseller) forni the office of the Standard
Life Assurance Company, in the tympanum of
which, over four fine Corinthian pilasters, is a
sculptured group from the chisel of Sir John Steel,
representing the parable of the Ten Virgins. In
George Street are about thirty different insurance
offices, or their branches, all more or less ornate
in architecture, and several banks.
In No. 19, on the same side, is the Caledonian,
the oldest Scottish insurance company (having
been founded in June, 1805). Previously the
office had been in Bank Street. A royal charter
was granted to the company in May, 1810, and
twenty-three years afterwards the business of life
assurance was added to that of fire insurance.
No. 25 George Street was the residence (from
1784 till his death, in 18zg), of Mr. James Ferrier,
Principal Clerk of Session, and father of Miss
Susan Ferrier, the authoress of " Marriage," &c.
He was a keen whist player, and every night of his
life had a rubber, which occasionally included Lady
Augusta Clavering, daughter of his friend and client
John, fifth Duke of Argyll, and old Dr. Hamilton,
usually designated " Cocked Hat " Hamilton, from
the fact of his being one of the last in Edinburgh
who bore that head-piece. When victorious, he
wcdd snap his fingers and caper about the room,
to tbe manifest indignation of Mr. Ferrier, who
would express it to his partner in the words, "Lady
Augusta, did you ever see such rediculous leevity
in an auld man 7 " Robert Burns used also to be
a guest at No. 25, and was prescnt on one occasion
when some magnificent Gobelins tapestry arrived
there for the Duke of Argyll on its way to Inverary
Castle. Mrs. Piozzi also, when in Edinburgh, dined
there. Next door lived the Misses Edmonstone,
of the Duntreath family, and with them pitched
battles at whist were of frequent nightly occurrence.
These old ladies figure in " Marriage " as
Aunts Jacky, Grizzy, and Nicky; they were grandnieces
of the fourth Duke of Argyll. The eldest
Miss Ferrier was one of the Edinburgh beauties in
her day ; and Bums once happening to meet her,
while turning the corner of George Street, felt suddenly
inspired, and wrote the lines to her enclosed
in an elegy on the death of Sir D. H. Hair. Miss
Ferrier and Miss Penelope, Macdonald of Clanronald,
were rival belles ; the former married
General Graham ot Stirling Castle, the latter Lord
Belhaven.
In No. 32 dwelt Francis Grant of Kilgraston,
father of Sir Francis Grant, President of the Royal
Academy, born in 1803 ; and No. 35, now a shop,
was the town house of the Hairs of Balthayock, in
Perthshire.
No. 45 has long been famous as the establishment
of Messrs. Blackwood, the eminent publishers.
William Blackwood, the founder of the magazine
which stills bears his name, and on the model of
which so many high-class periodicals have been
started in the sister kingdom, was born at Edinburgh
in 1776, and after being apprenticed to the
ancient bookselling firni of Bell and Bradfute, and
engaging in various connections with other bibliopoles,
in 1804 he commenced as a dealer in old
books on the South Bridge, in No. 64, but soon
after became agent for several London publishing
houses. In 1S16 he disposed of his vast stock of
classical and antiquarian books, I 5,000 volumes in
number, and removing to No. 17 Princes Street,
thenceforward devoted his energies to the business
of a-general publisher, and No. 17 is to this day a
bookseller's shop. ... Street.] THE BLACKWOODS. I39 CHAP,TER XIX. GEORGE STREET. Major Andrew Faser-The Father of Miss ...

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272 OLD AND NEW EDINBURGH. IArgyle square.
Many professors succeeded Blair as tenants of
the same house; among them, Alexander Chris
tison, Professor of Humanity, between 1806 and
1820, father of the great chemist, Professor Sir
Robert Christison, Bart.
In the north-western extremity of the square
was the mansion of Sir George Suttie, Bart. of
that ilk, and Balgone in Haddingtonshire, who
married Janet, daughter of William Grant, Lord
the two squares which was described as prevailing
in their amusements-tea-drinking and little fetes.
at a time when manners in Edinburgh were starched,
stately, and old-fashioned, as the customs and ideas.
that were retained, when dying out elsewhere.
On the east side of this square was the old
Trades Maiden Hospital, a plain substantial
edifice, consisting of a central block, having a great
arched door, to which a flight of steps ascended,
OLD HOUSES, SOCIETY, 1852. (From a Drawing by Gewp U'. Sim~o#.)
Prestongrange ; and here also resided his son, Sir
James, who, in 1818, succeeded his aunt, Janet
Grant, Countess of Hyndford, as heir of the line
of Prestongrange, and assumed thereby in consequence
the additional name and arms of Grant.
Their neighbour was Lady Mary Cochrane,
dwghter of Thomas sixth Earl of Dundonald, who
died unmarried at an old age.
In 1795 among the residents in -4rgyle Square
were Sir John Da!rymple, the Ladies Rae, Sutton
(dowager), and Reay, Elizabeth Fairlie (dowager of
George Lord Keay, who died in 1768). Isolated
from the rising New Town on the north by. the
great mass of the ancient city, and viewing it with
a species of antagonism and rivalry, we may well
imagine the exclusiveness of the little coteries in
and wings, with a frontage of about 150 feet. It
was intended for the daughters of decayed trades
men, and was a noble institution, founded in 1704
by the charitable Mrs. Mary Erskine, the liberal
contributor to the Merchant Maiden Hospital, and
who was indeed the joint foundress of both.
In 1794 fifty girls were maintained in the
hospital, paying AI 13s. 4d. on entrance, and receiving
when they left it a bounty of ;E5 16s. 69d.,
for then its revenue amounted to only A600 per
annum. In the process of making Chambers
Street this edifice was demolished, and the institution
removed to Rillbank near the Meadows.
It stood immediately opposite Minto House, a
handsome and spacious edifice on the north side
of the square, forty-five feet square, on the slope ... OLD AND NEW EDINBURGH. IArgyle square. Many professors succeeded Blair as tenants of the same house; among ...

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GENERAL INDEX 37s
Douglas, Sir William the Black
Knight ofliddesdal;, II.53,III.
354. 355
Dou&s, Baron, 11. 351
Dough., Lady Jane, Execution of,
Douglas of Grantully, Lady Jane,
1. 208, 158, 384, 11. 9, 1x5, 318,
349-351, 111. 9'
Douglas-Stewart, Lady Jane, Story
1. 83. 84
of 11.344.34
Doiglas, Lady?-z::es, 111. 311
Douglas, Campbell, architect, 111.
155
11. 1g0 ; his dagghter, ib.
Douglas General, 1. 281
Do.glas:WiIliam,minialurepainter,
Douglas, the painter, 11. 89, 90
nouglas. the clan, 11. q, 111. 19
" Dou las " the tragedy of, 11, =+,
21 , , . Douglcu, Dr., p&:$G4~I. zg8
Douglas, Francis Brown, Lord Pro-
Dougk Heron &Co. thebanken,
Douglas'Hotel, St. hndrew Square,
Douglas. Abbot William, 11. 48,
Doune, Lord, 11. zoo, 111. 3 4
Doune Tenace. 11. zoo, 111. 74
Dovecots, Superstitious belief in,
Dover, Duke of, 11. 36
Dow Craig, The, 11. 19 IOI, 1.06
Dowie Johnnie, I. rig, 19 * I +
his therm 1. 3 121
"Dowie Coilege:' Club, 1. xi9
Drama, The early Edinburgh, 11.
23, a+, w; denounced by the
Presbytery, II.24,39 ; theCalton
Hill plays 11. IDrawbridge'lhe
Leith 111. I 8
Dreghorn, iord, '11. 156,166, 911.
Dreghorn Castle. 111. 323, *324
Drem Haronyof 11. 233
Dres; Scottish &like of English
Dress 0; the Scottish gentry I
Dromedary A travelling 11. 15
Drum Ha&, 1. 95, 111.'*345, 34<
Drum Sands. near Cramond. 111
17, 151.
vost 11. 284
II. 19: failur; of 11'. 35
I. mz, 11. 174 342
111. 116
111. 319
32 3
in 1;g 11. 280
centuryago, 111. ~ 3 9
brother, 111. 75
hummond of Hawthornden thi
pat and historian, I. IS+, I1
a?, 54.62, 127, 217, =2,zSg, 111
26 28 ,354.35 ; Ben onson'
vi:it, ii?. 354 ; tte cavalier an<
poet,III. 355; hisloves,ib.; hi
death ib.
Drummbnd, Bishop W i l l i Aber
nethy, 1. a6r, a64
Drummond, Colin, physician, 11
299,301
Drummond, Dr. John, 11.147
Drummond, Gearge, I. 176, 183
Drummond Hay, Coins of, 11. 87
Drummond, am-, artist and anti
UXkUl, It'. b,'III.84, I W , ~
I)rummond Jean I. ga
Drummond of &mock, The, Ill
Drummoud Place. I. 217. 280. I1
Irawings by, I. *at%, *368
354 .. .
'9'7 1927 I 7 289 Drummond $&e Gardens, 11. 19
Drumniond Street, I. 38, 11. 3 y
335. 338, 111. 3, 7
Drummore Lord I. 251 11. 348
DrumquhGel d i r d of,'I. 259, 26
Drumsheunh 'villane. 11. 211. w
111. 7rr y65; vicw'from, 11i.x-6
Drumsheugh, Forest of, I. 237, 11
%h 14:
Drumsheugh House, 11. 115,
Drumsheugh Park, 111. 70, fl
111. 139
h r y , Sir Willim, I. 48, 49, 116,
)ruds gun-battery, I. fl, 330
111. 238 ; trcachcry Of, 111. 133,
134
Duchess of Bragarm," Play of
the, I. 343
hddingston, I. 383, 11. 'go, 303,
307, *309, 3x1, 3139 3141 315, 316,
3x7, 318. 347. 111. 86. 131, 134,
146, 165,314 ; origin of the name,
11. 914 ; barony of 11. 316
hddingston Chnrc'h, 11. * 312:
*313,314; gatewayof,II.*314,
famous ministers of, 11. 315, 317
hddingston House 11. 317
3uddineston Loch,'I. 8, 11, 203,
327, 11. 86, 315. *316, 111. 58,
143 ; skating thereon, 11. 315
h f f , the actor, I. 350
Iuffus, Lady, 11. 333
hgdd Stewart's monument, 11.
den, 111. 3567 357
1.9, * I11
Duke of Albany (see Jam= Duke
Duke of Albany's Own Hwh-
Duke oi Hamilton's apartments,
Duke S t m t 11.117 181
Duke's Walk, The,'I. 8, 3la, 11.
Dumfries, &:f, I. go, 11. 166,
of Albany)
landers 11.
H o l p d &lace, I. 326
3'33, 306, 07
111. 12
Square I1 343
Dumbrect's Hotel, St. Andrew
Dunbar kari of 111. 143
Dunba; Sir Jaies 11.2%
Dunbar: william, burns' lines on,
I. 142, 235, 236, 11. 255
Dunbar Battle of (sec Battles)
Dunbar$ Close I. 6, 5511. 3
Duocan, AdmLl, 11.343, 111. 158,
"23
3797 384,II.I54,174 31% 111.39
Duncan, Dr. .Andrev, physician, 1.
Duncan Lady 11.343
Duncan: the p h e r , 11. 93
Duncan's Land, 111. 78
Dundas. Sir Lawrence, I. 217, XI.
nu,'& Sir ?homas, 11. l a
Dundas: Henry, Viscount Melville
Dundas. Lord Chief B a n . 11.210.
86 196, 171 282
(sec Melville)
343
Dundas, Robcrt Lord Amiston 1.
123,15g,172, 42, 11. 39 II1.;83
Dundas, President, fatie; of Lord
Melville, 1. 242, 346, 11. 210
Dundas, Lord Pradent, I. &,It.
38
Dundas, Lord Advocate, 11.343
Dundas, Sir David, 1. 366, 11. 287.
111. 105. 264: d o t e of h i
. . bf, rri. 7
111. 86,105
Dnnda. oJAske, Bamn, 11. 171
Dundas of Bsefhwood, Sir Kobert,
Dun&, Lady Emily, 11. xg8
nundas Lady Eleonora, 111. 2 9
D u n 4 Col. Walter, 1. 54
Dundas, Lieut.&. Francis, 11.
Dundas, Mr.. 11. m, 283
Dundas riots, 1791. 11. 343
Dundas Street, 11. 199; its Rsi.
dents, 11. ~gg, 111. 162
Dundee, Viscount, I. 62, 63,65,7t
Dundonald, Earl of, 1. 105,331.11.
Dundrennan Lord 11. 175
Dunglas and Greethaw, Baron, I1
279
Dunkeld, Bishops of, I. 39,253. I1
54, 251, 287, 111. 13% 307, 314
Dunfernline, Earl of, I. 3r6.11. z&
Ddermline, Lord, 111. p, 32
Dunfermline, H o w of the A&
210, 342
a579 27"
of, I. 212. 25
Dunlop, Dr. Jam, Fkquest to thq
University, 111. 26
Dunmore Earl of 11. 310
Dunn's dote1 II.'Ba 166, 161
Dupplin, Yi'ount, 1: 50
Durie. Lord, I. i68,242,III.31~,33!
Durie, AbborsofMelrose, I.a53,25.
hrie George, Abbot of Dunfermline'
I. 2x2
>yce,'the painter 11.87
Iysart, Lyonell L r l of,' 2I.ip;
Countess of, 11. 167
Jyvours stane, The, I. 152
E
Fade and Henderson. nurservmen. . I 111. 159
Eagle's Rock, Cramond, Ill. 315
Ear and Eye Dispenw-, I. a86
Earl Gre Street 11. 2x8
Earthen hound, i. gS, 102,106,116,
255, 11. 31. 80, 82. 9% 199. 4 3
bead of the, 11. 93-100; new
from Princes Street, Phtr r7
East and W a t Mayfield Houses,
111. 51
3x6, 349,111. .so
East Cross Causeway, 1. 384. 11.
Eat end of High Street, Nethei
Bow, and west end of Camngate,
T 1 ~ E
Eastbaik. Lord, 11. 10
Fst Gardens, 11.127
East Hermitage Place, Leith, 111
East India Club, 111. 125
E& London Street 11. 185
East Maitland Strc;t, 11. aoq
East Morningside H o w , 111. 47
East Pilton, 111. '309
East Princes Street Gardens. I1
166
100 a14
East b e e n Street Gardens, 11. XI;
East Register Street, 11. 176
East Richmond Street, 11. 337
East Warriston House, 111. IM
Easter, The district, 11. 221
Easter and Wester Pilton, 111. p
Easter Coates. Mansionof, 11. III
Easter Hill, 11. 199
Easterlings, 111.94
Easter Road, 11. 309, III.128,13i
Easter Wemy4 I. 3ag
Eastern and Wekern Duddiingston
133, 15% 158 160
11. 3r4
Echo Bank, 111. 5 4 57; old how
Echbing Rmz, The, 11. 313
Edgar, Rear-Admiral, 111. 142
Edgar's map of Edinbur h, 1. 3"
338, 34% 3% 3731 38551. 17, 81
Edgefield's (Lord), House, I. 241
Edge-tool maker, The first. 11. a6
Edinburgh Academy 111. 81
E$nburgh, Arms of ;he City of, 1
Edinburgh Castle, I. *I, z, 14-79
Stawand Camden'saccannts 15
the lecend of the White fiar,
21; Holyrood Abbey, oa; th
monks of the Castrum Puelb
rum, ib. ; capture of the Castle b
the English, ib.; it becomes
royal.residence,,a3; wars of th
Scottlsh succession, ib . "Wa
lace's Cradle," 24, *z;f the foi
tress dismantled, a+ ;again in th
hands of the En lah, 25' Bu
locks suacagem t r its reAveq
ib.;repairofthefort~,26;pr(
gress of the City, ib. : Henry I\
mvades the City, 27; the Englii
baffled, ib. : Al+y's pr0phe.q
ab.; lamre rding the buMm
of houses. ir; sumptuary law
28 ; murder of James I., 29 ; c1
ronation of James 11.. ib. ; Caul
intrigues, 29,30 ; Lord Chancellc
Crichton, 30; arrogance of t h
Earl of Douglas ib. : the I' blac
dinner " ib . th; Castle besiegec
31 . th; &;'fortified i6. ; +m<
IIi. and his haugdiy no ill@
32 ; plots of the Duke of Alban
and Earl of Mar, ib. ; mysterioi
death of Mar, ib.; apture an
escape of the Duke ofAlbany, 3 .E.; ciptitity of James HI., y
ichard of Gloumter at Edii
burgh,+.; the"C;ol$m Chartei
of the city, ib. ; the Blue RL)
ket," 34, * 36 ; accession of Jam
at 111. 5
2- 246,267. VI, 330,334
16
IV 35 : tournaments, ib. : " thc
se& sisters ot' Borthwick." v.5.'-
36.; the " Ylodden Wall," 38, +o ;
reign of Jam- V 38-42 ; Edmburgh
underthe f&tionsofnobles,
38-40 ; the castle attacked by
the Earl of Hertford, 43,111.16g;
death of Queen Mary of Guise,
I. 44, 45; accession of Mary
Stuart, 45h; birth of Jam- VI
46 *48: t esregeof1~73,47, I I f ?$ ; the a t y bombarded from the
astle, I. 47 ; Elkabeth'sspy, 48;
Sir W. Drury's dispositions for
the &Fe, 48,49 : execuaon of Sir
W: h.rkaldy, 50.: repairof the
ruins, ab. : execution of the Earl
of Morton, ib.; visit of Charles
I p, 51; procession to Holyr&,
Si : coronation of Charles
I., ib. : the struggle against episcopacy,
g1,52; siege of 1644 52 -
the spectre drummer 54; th;
castle baieged by CroLwell ib. ;
ten years' peace in Edinbkh
55 ; the Restoration, ib. ; th;
Argylcs, 56-58 ; the accession of
ames VII., 58 ; sentence of the
rl of Argyle, 58,59 ; h~ clever
59 ; the last sleep of Ar-
?e?.; hisdeath, ib. ; tortureof
the covenanters, 59,150; proclamation
of Williarn and Mary, pII;
the siege ,of 1689 6 internew
between the Duk;p?&rdon and
Viscount Dundee, ib. ; brilliant
defence of the &de, 63,64 ; Qpitulation
of the Duke of Gordm,
65 ; inner gateway of the Castle * 65 ; the spectre of Clawhaw:
66 ; torture of Neville Payne, id. ;
Jacobite plots, ib.: entombing of
thc regalia 66, 67; project for
surprismg ;he fortnss, SI ; right
of sanctuary abolished. ib. ; Lord
Drummonfla plot, 68 : Dome acv.
biteprixmen, 6g; "rebeldies"
70 ; iunes Macgregor, ib. ; de
at escape, 71 : tears as to the
destruction of the crown, sword,
and m p ~ e , ib.; crown-room
opened in 1794 and in 1817 id. ;
Mons Mag, 74 ; general d&p
tion of the Castle, 7 5 7 9
Edinburgh Castle and nty Ancient
and modern vieis of. 1. q. 17.
k
Cast / e vaults, 70 71 ; attempts
-
from various points, 11.193) 216,
111. 117
Edinburgh in 1745 1. 331-334;
Charles Stuart in \he mty, I. 323
Edinburgh Origin of the name, I.
12 ; the infant city, I. 26 ; first
enclosed by walls, 1. 31
Edinburgh and Glasgow Railway,
11. 19 113
Edinburgh and Leith Seamen's
Friendly Society, 111. q
Ediabzdrqh Aa'vmtkr, The, 1.318,
339, 11. 'VV 11% '7% 3a4 35'.
III.63r703 73 752 7% 85, 11% 123,
124l135.139.154,~34.~35.258,306
Edinburgh Assembly Rooms, 1.314,
inburgh Assoclation for Impmving
the Condition of the Poor, 11.
162
Edinburgh Arscdation of Science
and Arts, 11. 143
Edinburgh Bishop of 111.147
Edinburgh' Blind Asyhm, 111. a54
Edinburgh Bamic W e n , Leith
Walk 111. 98. its coratm ib.
Edinb&h &teryCom&y, 11.
"17
Edinburgh Chamber of Commerce
and Manufactures, I. 379, 111.
288
Edinburgh Che5 Club, 11.152
Edinburgh Club, The old, 111.
Ed:s7 * 3 4 3x7 ... INDEX 37s Douglas, Sir William the Black Knight ofliddesdal;, II.53,III. 354. 355 Dou&s, Baron, 11. ...

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Vol. 6  p. 385 (Rel. 0.31)

386 OLD AND NEW' EDINBURGH.
'Plague in Leith, The 111. 180,186
Plainstane's close ~ i . 235
Playfair, Dr. Lyo;, 111. 24
Playfair, Professor, 1. 339, 11.106,
1% 1p,z70' monument to,II.rro
Playfaii, W. H., architect, I. 379,
11. 83 88, 97, 106, 110, 2x41 335,
111. ;3, 68, 83
Playhouse Close 11. 23
Pleasance, he, i. 38, 253,278,295.
298, 335, 382-384, 11. 3, 218 135,
240, 301, 3247 330, 337, 3383 345,
111.54 ; origin of thename, I. 382
Plewlands, The, 111. 42
Pocketsleve 111.92
PokerCluh ?he, I . ~ O , Z ~ T , I I I . I ~ ~
Police of Ehinburgh, 11. 120
Police Office, I. 242
Political unions. Illegality of the, . - -
11. 236, 237
Pollok. Robert. 11. ICO
Polton Lord iII. 3;6
PolwAh d d y 11. aog
Pont, dkrt, dinister of St. Cuthbert's
Church 11. 131 I 2
Pont, Robert, hrovost 'o?Trinity
Pontheus, John, the quack doctor,
Poole's Coffee-house, 11. xza
Popular songs of 1745, I. 325
Port Hopetoun, 11.~15~226 ; Edinbur
h Castle from, 11. *a16
Port .ft. Nicholas, 111. 171
Portmus Captain I. 130 111.262
263 ; hHnged b;the mdb, I. 130:
College, 1.305, 307
I. zoo, 201
~. z3i, 11. 2 I, 232
Porteous john, herald painter,
111.4:
Porreou~ riots I. 4 123, 128-1 I
178, 218, 3:g; h n t i n g ~f t2:
111. III .___ ._
Portland, Henrietta Duchess of,
Portland,'Duke of, 111.42
Portland Place 11. zza
Portobello, I. h3, 111. 138, 143-
154165; Romanroadnear I. 10,
fro; view of Portobed, III.
:IN, *152, *r53: plan of, 111. . 147: churchesandchawls. 111.
II.rg1 111.42
- .
147; * 153
Portobello Hut. 111. IM
Portobello review lhe' '111. 146
Portobello Koad '111. ;38
Portobello Sand; 111.145, Plate p
Rortsburgh CO& House, 11. *=I. -
2=4
Porbburgh, The Eastern, I. 3 8 , k
l p , I I . 222 224 226 227,22gr 334
33s ; anciehtly H htirgh, 11. 103
Post Office, The old, I. 274 338,
*356; the new I. 340, 351, 353,
*357,358.364; ;he Scottishpostal
system, I. 353- 58 : itsexpenses
at various periJs, I. 355,356; its
posf-ten 1.354,355,39; the
vanous po&office buildings, I.
358
Post Office Close, I. 358
Potato, The introducer of the, 11. p
Potterrow, The, 1. p, 335,II. 135,
231, =4=r 274. 327, 330, 33% 332,
Potterrow ort, 11. 257, 334 331,
111.3
Poulterer The King's 111.66
Poultry AndS. Dean,'III. 65, 66
Poultry Market The old I. 373
Powburn, The ' 11. 267 ' 111. 29
I 58; its otier names:
Powburn House 111. 51
Powderhall III:88 8g *g3
Powrie, di1liaq 'ac<ornplice ot
Bothwell in the murder of Darnley,
1. 263, 276, 111. 4, 6
Prayer, An ambiguous, 11. 133
Preaching Friar's Vennel, The, I.
Preaching Window," Knox'r
house, I. 214
3331 3 3 4 , p 345, 111. 51
81.:; '
'( p7,258
Pre-historic Edinburgh, I. 9-14
Prendergast's revenqe, 11. 52, 53
.Prentice, Henry, the introducer 01
Presbyterian Church, Re-establish.
.Preston, John, Lord Fentonbams,
the potato, 11. 30
ment of the, 11.246
-1.206 -
Preston, Sir Michael, I. q
&ton of Craigmillar Provost Sir
?reston of Craignillar. Sir Richard.
Henry, 11. 242, 278,'III. 61
111.61
?reston of Craigmillar, Provost Sir
Simon, I. w, 305, 11.279.111.
58, 59, 61, 62, 107
'reston of Valleyfield, Sir Charles,
11. 26, 335
326, 330. ,331: 332.
?reston, Lieut.-General, I. 322,323.
?redon relic, bt. Giles's Cathedral,
I. 140
?restonAeld manor-house, 111. *56,
57, 58
?restongrange, Lord, 11.242, 272,
111.10
?restonpans, 11. 283 16,.340, 111.
IM, 174, a63; the' ishermen of,
111. 300 ; battle of (see Battles)
?reston Street, 111. 50
?retender, Defence of the, 111.194
?rice, Sir Magnus, 1. 117
?nestfield or Prestonfield, I. 3 2 6 3 .
Primrose, Viscount, I. m3,II. 124;
Primrose, Si Archibald, I. 91,111.
?rimrose Lady Dorothea, I. 257
Primus 'khe title 11. 246
Prince 'Anne of benmarks Dragoons
I. 64
Prince kharley's house, Duddmgston
11. *317
Princ;Consort, The, I. 358,II. 79;
memorial to, 11. 175, '77, a84
PrinceofWales, Marrageof, 11.284
Prince of Wales's Graving Dock,
Leith, 111. 286, q8g
358, 3647372r 11- 93, 95, 99s 100,
14, 1x0, 114, 117, 118, 119-130,
176, 182, 191 no6, zog, ?XI, 213,
372, 383,111.'146, 295 ; view from
Scott'smonument, 11.*124: view
looking west, 11. * '25
hinale, Andrew Lord Haining, I.
315, III.5p
Viscountess, I. 104
I06
Princes Street, I.39,a55,295, 339.
131,136, 139, 151, 163, 165, 175,
27;
Pringle, Sir Walter, I. 1%
Pringle, Thomas 11. 140
Pringle of Stichel, Colonel, 111.45;
Printed, Number of, in Edinburgh
Printing-press, The first, in Scot-
Prison& of 'war in Edinburgh
Privy C&ud, Imd Keeper of the,
Proctor John thecartoonist,III. 82
Project' for :urprising Edinburgh
Promisc;ous dancing, Presbyterian
Property Investment Society, I. 123
Protestant Institute, I. zg , 11. z6a
Provost of Edinburgh, Salary and
privileges of the, 11. 281, 111.
270; his first appearance in official
decorations, 11. 282
Provost Stewart's Land. West Bow,
Lady 11. 163
in 1779, I. 318
land I. 142 255
Castle 11. a48
1. 370. 372
Castle I. 67
abhorrence of, I. 315
I. 325
Provosts of Leith, The, 111. q,
Provat's Close, 11. 277
Provost's House. Kirk+f-Field,
219, zm, 270
111.3
Publicopinionin Edinburgh, Weak.
ness of formerly I. 285
PuirFolks'Purses:The,I. 138, 11.6
Pulteney, Sir ames 1. 106 '' Purging *' o/ the Scottish army,
Furitan g&ner,Anecdote ofa, 1.56
Pye, Sir Robert, 111. 260, 261
111. 186 187
Q
Quadrangle, The, Holymod Palace,
Quality Street. Leith, III.2~1,235,
11. '76
. .
Q,';?ity Wynd, Rotten Row, Leith
Quarry Holes, The, 11. 101, zw
Queen Mary (sec Mary Stuart)
111. 173
111. 128, 133, 151
Queen Mary's Apartments, Holyrood
Palace 11. 66, * 67, 74 ; h u
bedchambei, ib.
Queen Mary's Bath, 11. 40, 41
!&.en Mary's Bower, Moray
House 11. *32 33
&een Mary's r&m Dungeon in
Edinburgh Castle below, I. *ZI,
,R
Q&en Mary's room, Rmeburn
House, 111. 103
Queen Mary's sundial 11. 68, 73
Queen Marys tree i1. 316; her
pear.tree, Mercdiston Castle,
Plate 26 ; her tree at Craigmillar
Castle 111. 59 *60 . Queen itreet, iI. 115, 151-158,
*16o 162 175 186 18 ,194, 199,
Que& d e e t Gardens, 11.185~194.
&eenptreet, k i t h , III.r73,qo,
Queen's Dock Leith 111. 283 285
Queen's Drivi, The, \. XI, 11.'303.
ZW ;U2 d83, iI8, i72, III. 74,106
am
ueen Street Hall 111. 88
231, 232
312
Brigade, 1. 286
the, Ptate 23
turret near the I. * 49, 78
11. 17
Queen's Edinburgh Rifle Volunteer
Queen's Park, Volunteer review in
Queen.s Post, Ancient postern and
Queen's Theatre k d Opera Houl,
Queen $ctoria'svisit to Edinburgh,
11. 354, 362
Queensberry, Duke of, I. 162. 164,
11. 8, 35, 38, 225, 226, 351, 111.
Queensberry Duchess of I 155,
11. 37 ; herleccentric habh,.II. 38
Quernsbeny Earl of, 11. a53
Queensberry'House, Canongate, I.
1058 1'55, 327. 11. 10, 357 36, 37,
38; its present use, 11. 38
Queensberrv Lodge, 11. 38
Queensferry, I. 16, 19,II. 101. I!I.
Q u e e n 2 4 Road, 11. 115,185,sm,
Qneensferry Street, 11. 136
Qqhitncss John of, Provost, 11.278
Quince? +hornas de, 11. 135, 140,
246, 265,365
63,211, 306,307,314 ; theherrug
fishe at 111. p
207, 111. 255 - II.74,359
R
Rae Sir David 11. 26 203
~ a e l Sir Wildm 11. ;27, III. 33c
Rae: Lady, !I. &, 339
&burn, Sir Henry, I. 119, 159,
a y , 384, 11. 88, go. gz, xzz,1z6,
his stepdaughter, 111. 77
Hadical Road," The, 11. II
I. 285
11. 188
187. 188, 111. 7lr 74, 6, 77, 140;
Raeburn Place, 111.79
Railston Bishop of Dunked, 11.54
Railway;, their influence foreseen,
Ramsay, Allan (see Allan Ramsay:
Ramsay, Allan, the painter, 1. 83,
Ramsay, Sir Alexander 11. 206
Ramsay, Sir Alexander,'Provost, I.
Ramsay of Dalhousie. Sir Alex.
y s Close, 11. I8
'99
ande;, I. 24, 25, 111.354, 355
Ramsay of Abbotshall, Sir Andrew.
I. 311, 11. 74 ; Lord Provost, 11.
,281
Ramsay, Sir George I. 162
Ramsay, Sir John, IiI. 42
Ramsay of Balmain, Sir John, 11.
Ramsay, Sir William 11. 166
Ramsay of Dalhousii, Sir W i l l i i
239
111.94
Ramsay, William, banker, 11. 362
111. 124
Ramsay, Cuthbert, I. 258
Ramsay Dean 11. 126, 205, 206
portrait of, 1;. * 128
Ramsay, Duel between Sir Georgq
and Capt. Macrae, 111. 13-14,
Ramsay, General John, I. 83, I1
I28
camsay, Lady, and Capt. Macrae,
<amay Lady Elizabeth 111.32
Zamsay: Miss Christian,'her fondcamsay,
The Misses, 111. 138
camsay Garden, I. 83, 11.82 ; view
camsay Lane, 1. 87. 91
camsay Lane, Portp,bello 111. *153 <amsnpS, Peter, White Horse
<am$y's Fort, Leith, 111. 171
tandolph Earl of Moray 11.47
candolph' Sir Thomas ; successful
re-captlre of the Castle by, 1. 24
candolph Cliff, 111. 70,75. f'tate 28
candolph Crescent, I. 237, 11. 11.5,
ZW, 2057 2071 20% 209
bnkeillor Street 11. 39
cankenion Club,'The, 11.180
lavelrig, 111. 334
tavelrig Hill, 111. 331
<avelston, I. 331, Ill. 79, 106
tavelston House 111. 106, 108
<wen's Craig ri. 307
<awdon Lad;Elizabeth, 11. 18
<ay Jdhn rectur of the high
Sc~ool, Ii. 290
<eade,Charles, thenovelist, 111.303
ieay George Lord II. 272, 111.8
<ay: Lady ElLabTeth Fairlie, 12
tecord of Entails, I. 372
cedbraes manor-house, 111. 88, 89. * 93. its changes, 111. p ' !&gauhet," References to, 11.
<edhallCastle, 111.313; themanor
tedheughs, 'I he 111. 114,31g,33r
<ed House The' 11. 330
teed. Robert. K'inp's architect. 11.
111. 139--14I
ness for cats, 11. 18
from Princes Street, Pidr 17
Inn ' 1. zgg
272, 346
270
house, 11.43
R&rig, KLdS of, 111. 134, 135,
Restalrig Lwh, 111. 13
Keston Lord, 11. 199
Restodtion festivals 11. 334
Restoration of Cha;les II., Popularity
of the, I. 55, '59, 176, 11.
334
Restoration of James VII., Plots
for the I. 66
Review dfScottish Volunteers, 1860,
11. 284.354 ; Plate 23
RevoliitionClub,The, 111. s a 3 ; i t ~
meLI, I. *63 .
168 ... OLD AND NEW' EDINBURGH. 'Plague in Leith, The 111. 180,186 Plainstane's close ~ i . 235 Playfair, Dr. Lyo;, ...

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Tron Church.
sum had been paid but once in ten years, yet, if it
had been properly managed, the accumulated sum
behoved to have exceeded ~16,000 sterling."
The old spire had been partially built'of wood
covered with lead, according to a design frequently
repeated on public buildings then in Scotland. It
was copied from the Dutch ; but the examples of it
are rapidly disappearing. A bell, which cost 1,490
merks Scots, was hung in it in 1673, and continued
weekly to summon the parishioners to prayer and
-
EXPLANATION.
A The principal Entry.
B The mea 01 thrSyuare.
C The Piazza,
I3 The Coffee-room inthe west Coffec-hare.
d Rwnis aod Closets in diLlp.
a The Coffee-mm in the middk Ccffec
e Rmpis and Closets in ditm.
F The Coffee-room in the la t Coffeehoux.
f Raoms io ditto.
G The Great Sair leadiog to the Custon
H The P a q e Ieadioi 10 ditt-.
I 'An open for 1etriI.g in li6ht to the Houses
in the Writer's Court under the level of
the Square.
E The Passage belwecn the Square and
Wriicr's Court.
1. Seven Shops withiu the Square
m Four Shops behi d the raqe tvthe srect.
N Ten Shop an a line with the street.
0 An open of four feet for dcoopirg eaws
P Part ot the M'riter-5 Court.
g Area of ditto.
house. -
H0"W.
of the neighbouring houses
B
pounds yearly. It is an edifice of uninteresting
appearance and nondescript style, being neither
Gothic nor Palladian, but a grotesque mixture of
both. It received its name from its vicinity to the
Tron, or public beam for the weighing of merchandise,
which stood near it.
A very elegant stone spire, which was built in
1828, replaces that which perished in the great
conflaggation of four years before.
The Tron beam appears to have been used as
GENERAL PLAN OF THE ROYAL EXCHANGE. (Frmn an Engraviw in fhe "Scofs Mafizzine" fm 1754.)
sermon till the great fire of 1824, when it was
partly melted by heat, and fell with a mighty crash
through the blazing ruins of the steeple. Portions
of it were made into drinking quaighs and similar
memorials.
In 1678 the tower was completed by placing
therein the old clock which had formerly been in
the Weigh House.
Towards the building of this church the pious
Lady Yester gave 1,000 merks. In 1703 the
magistrates appointed two persons to preach alternately
in the Tron Church, to each of whom they
gave a salary of forty guineas, as the Council Re-,
gister shows ; but about 1788 they contented themselves
with one preacher, to whom they gave fifty
a pillory for the punishment of crime. In Niccol's
'' Diary" for 1649, it is stated that " much falset
and cheitting was daillie deteckit at this time by
the Lords of Sessioune; for the whilk there was
daillie nailing of lugs and binding of people to the
Trone, and boring of tongues; so that it was a
fatal year for false notaries and witnesses, as daillie
experience did witness."
On the night of Monday, the 15th of November,
1824, about ten o'clock, the cry of "Fire ! " was
heard in the High Street, and it spread throughout
the city from mouth to mouth ; vast crowds came
from all ,quarters rushing to the spot, and columns
of smoke and flame were seen issuing from the
second *floor of e house at the head of the old ... Church. sum had been paid but once in ten years, yet, if it had been properly managed, the accumulated ...

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H o l y d . ] MODERN IMPROVEMENTS. 79
bade them farewell in the Gallery of the Kings,
while a vast concourse assembled outside, all
wearing the white cockade. Another: multitude
was collected at Newhaven, where the Fishermen's
Society formed a kind of body-guard to cover the
embarkation.
'' A few gentlemen," says the editor of " Kay's
Portraits," " among whom were Colonel Macdonel,
the Rev. Mr. (afterwards Bishop) Gillis, John Robinson,
Esq., and Dr. Browne, accompanied His
Majesty on board the steamer, which they did not
leave till she was under weigh. The distress of the
king, and particularly of the dauphin, at being
obliged to quit a country to which they were so
warmly attached was in the highest degree affecting.
The Duc de Bordeaux wept bitterly, and the Duc
d'AngouEme, embracing Mr. Gillis d la 3ranfaise,
gave unrestrained scope to his emotion. The act
of parting with one so beloved, whom he had
known and distinguished in the salons of the
Tuileries and St. Cloud, long before his family had
sought an asylum in the tenantless halls of Holyrood,
quite overcame his fortitude, and excited
feelings too powerful to be repressed. When this
ill-fated family bade adieu to our shores they
carried with them the grateful benedictions of the
poor, and the respect of all men of all parties who
honour misfortune when ennobled by virtue."
In Edinburgh it is well known that had H.K.H.
the late Prince Consort-whose love of the picturesque
and historic led him to appreciate its
natural beauties-survived a few years longer, many
improvements would have taken place at Holyrood
; and to him it is said those are owing which
have already been effected.
Southward of the palace, the unsightly old tenements
and enclosed gardens at St. Anne's Yard
were swept away, including a quaint-looking dairy
belonging to the Duke of Hamilton, and by
1857-8-9 the royal garden was extended south
some 500 feet from the wall of the south wing, and
a new approach was made from the Abbey Hill,
a handsome new guard-house was built, and the
carved door of the old garden replaced in the wall
between it and the fragment of the old abbey
porch ; and it was during the residence of H.R.H.
the Prince of Wales at Holyrood that the beautiful
fountain in the Palace Yard was completed, on the
model of the ancient one that stands in ruin nowy
in the quadrangle of Linlithgow, and which is
referred to by Defoe in his "Tour in Great
Britain."
The fountain rises from a basin twenty-four feet in
diameter to the height of twenty-eight feet, divided
into threestages, andby flying buttresses has theeffect
of a triple crown. From the upper of these the water
flows through twenty ornate gurgoils into three
successive basins. The basement is of a massive
character, divided by buttresses into eight spaces,
each containing a lion's head gurgoil. This is surmounted
by eight panels having rich cusping, and
between these rise pedestals and pinnacles. The
former support heraldic figures with shields. These
consist of the unicorn bearing the Scottish shield, a
lion bearing a shield charged with the arm of
James IV. and his queen, Margaret of England;
a deer supports two shields, with the arms of the
queens of James V., Magdalene of France, and
Mary of Guise ; and the griffin holds the shields of
James IV. and his queen, Margaret of Denmark.
The pinnacles are highly floriated, and ,enriched
with flowers and medallions
It is in every way a marvellous piece of stone
carving. The flying buttresses connecting the stages
are deeply cusped. On the second stage are eight
figures typical of the sixteenth century, representing
soldiers, courtiers, musicians,' and a lady-falconer,
each two feet six inches in height. On the upper
stage are four archers of the Scottish Guard, supporting
the imperial crown. It occupies the site whereon
for some years stood a statue of Queen Victoria,
which has now disappeared.
Still, as of old, since the union of the cron-ns:
for a fortnight in each year the Lord High Conimissioner
to the General Assembly of the Church
of Scotland holds semi-royal state in Holyrood,
gives banquets in its halls, and holds his ledes in
the Gallery of the Kings. ... o l y d . ] MODERN IMPROVEMENTS. 79 bade them farewell in the Gallery of the Kings, while a vast concourse ...

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GENERAL INDEX.
299, 307, 342 ; Lord Provost, 11.
282 283 293' hisfuneral I 155
Kindid, b a d , of Coates 'Hbuse
first constable of Edinbured
Castle, I. 79
Kincaid, John, of Craig House
111. 42; his ancestors and de!
scendantr ib.
Kincaids of Warriston, The, 11. 182,
Ki%$d 2nd 11. 282
Kincardine, Earl of, I. 101
Kincleven Lord 111. 221
King Ceo;ge's dstion, Leith Dock,
Kinghorn, Earl of, 11. 352
Kinghorn, 111. 211
Kinghorn-ness, 111. 294
King ames's Knowe, 111. 29
King dtreet Leith lII.176,178 227
Kiugeston k r John de I. a4 ;5
Kings, Ghery of the: Hol)rood
Kings of Sc*&yand Kneller's par.
King's Advocate. Privileges of the,
-
111. 283
Pal==, 11 4, 76, '77, 79
traits of the., I. <58
IE,243
Kings Body Guard for Scotland,
King's Bridge, The, I. 118, 195, 11.
11. 352
215,
Kings Company &Archers, 11.352
King's Cramand, 111. 3q, 317
King's Head Inn 11. 242
King's Park I. 4 4 11. 7, 310, 313,
915, 346; ;ombat)in the, 11. 306
King's Printing-office, I. 376
" Kingh Quhair," The, I. a7
King's Road, I. 295
King's stables, The, 11. 224, 225
Kine's Wark. Leith. 111. 216. 217. I . - . ".. 23, a45
Kingston, Viscount, 111. 30
Kingston Gmge, 111. 338
Kmleith, 111. 164
Kinloch, Lord, 11. 197
Kinloch Sir Alexander 111. 343
Kinloch' Sir David Id. 343 .
Kinloch: Pmvost 'sir Francs, I.
169, 254, 111. 94, 3432 344; his
son3 111 344
Kinlodh, Hkry, House of, 11. 18,
'9
Kinloch's Clm, I. 238, 11. 18
Kinnoul, Earls of, 1. 371, 372, 111.
108
Kintore, Earl of, 11. 86, 339
Kirkbraehead House 11. II;, 136.
138, *x4q 210; dew of Edmburgh
Castle from, 1. * 64
Kirkcudbriqht Lard I. 153
Kirkaldy, Sir jame< I. 50
Kirkaldyof Grange, Sir William I.
47,20+.259, 11. 181, 225, 111. ;9,
36 6r 134 247; his defence of
th6 C h e k. 47-49, 78,116 121
214, 218, ill. 5 ; becomei'pro:
vast, 11. 279 ; %is dgth, I. 151,
111. arg
Kirkgate, The, Leith, 111. 175, 186,
213-226, 235 293 279; King
James's Hospital m'the, 111.186,
217; ancient chapel in the, 111.
* z u , 214; view of the Kirkgate,
Ill. *213
Kirkheugh The, I. 181, 11. 243
Kirkland, il. 60
Kirkliston, I. 23
Kirk Loan, Tie, 11. 114, 131, 111.
id-of-Field, The, I. 263; 266, 11.
71 222, 23 224 '51r 254, 2841
I, I, 4, 7, 8, 23,
39, 59 ; its provosts, 111. a, 3, 7 ;
the provost's house 111. 3 6,
23 ; murder of Lord barnle;,fIl.
3- 23; rough sketch of the
Kirt-af.Field 111. * 5
Kirk-of-Field Pbrt, III.3,7: affray
In the 111. 7
Kirkaf-'Field Wynd, I. 195, 11.
254, 111. 2, 3
Kirkpatricks of Allisland 11. 217
Kirk Semion, Leith, Pet& tyranny
of the, 111. 254
Kirk Session of St. Cuthbert's, 11.
K7= 78
z& 3797 19;.
216
Kirk Style The old I. 240
Kirkyard, !The, Hoiyrood, I I. 69
Kitchen Tower The I. 36
Kneller, Sir Gohfrey: I. 158
KnightsHospitallersof St.Anthony,
Leith 11. 319
Knight; of St. John, I. 321, I1 52,
232 ; hall of the, I. 314
Knolles, Sir William, I. 300
Knox, John, 1. a, 6, 93, 140, 143,
150, 151, 2=2, 113, 214, 254,298,
11. 64, 66, 71, 74, 262, 286, 288,
111. 35, 1. 174 177 178 I79
181, 223 ; Es puliit iLSt. Ciles';
Church, I. '143, 150, 11. 8 .
his grave, I. '150, 158; txi
manse of I. 212; his study, I.
*=la ; hi; house, I. 276, Plntc 9 ;
portraitandautographof I. *z13;
effigy of, I. 214; his wives, ib. ;
his death 1. 215; his bedroom
and sitti;g-raam, I. *216 *217;
his interview with Queen'Mary,
11. 67 : painting representing his
dispensing the sacrament, 11.89;
bronze portrait of, 11. 127
Knox, John, minister of North
Leith, 111. 254
Krames, The, St. Giles's Church,
I. 124 747 166 219
Kyd Bhie 'oh; 11 242
KyAchin, dhe &d of, 111. 192
L
Ladies'Assembly Room,The,II. 325
Ladies' College 11. 158
Ladies Euthuhiasm of towards
PrinkCharles Edward: I. 327,330
Ladies' fashions 1.243-245; oyster
tavern partie; patronised by, I.
1IC
La-&s' Walk Leith 111. 171
Ladies' Well 'The <[I. 54
Ladv aisle. +he. St. Giles's Cathe-
223, 356
Lady Lovat's Land I. 255
Lady Stair'sClose, i. 1o2,106,'107.
258, 282, 11. 118
Lady Wynd, The, 11. 224,zmS
Laigh Council-house, The, I. 175,
the council-rwm, 1. 116, 123
Laighshops 111. 126
Laiug, Aleiander, architect, 11.
h?;, Alexander Gordon, 11. 120;
his father 11. 120
Laing, Dahd, bookseller, I. 375,
11. 192 254, 382, 111. 128 149
Laing dilliam bookseller 'I. 375
Lamhie Gptah I. 204 &S
Lamb's' Close, gt. Gilks Street,
Lammius Seal of Amauld, I. * 182
Lamond 6f Lamond ohn 11.173
b p Acre Corsto$ine,rII1.1i8
Lancashire,'Tom comedian, I.
Landseer, the painter, 11. 89
Lang Dykes 11. 114 182 213 269
h g Gate,'The, 1.' @,'249,' 324, :: Lang Sandy," Ii. 28
Lang Sandy Gordon '' 11.157
"Lang Sandy Wood,"II. 115 (see
Wood, Dr. Alexander)
Langtoft, the chronicler, 111.351
Lanier, Sir John, I. 64, 63
Lantern and tower Jt. Giles's
Church. I. IAA. 116
Leith, 111. 188
335, 364, 11. 1x4 176, 111. 135
356: the ancient church; 111. -- .
357,358, '961
Laud, Archbshop, I. 51
Lauder, Si Alexander, Provost,
L
Pro3
Laude
Lau e; Sir John (ste Fountainhall)
Lauder: Sir Thomas Dick, 11. 95.
"97 I![. 49
111. 49. 50; his works, 111. 5d
Lauder Provost George of 11.278
Lauder: Thomas, Bishop Af Dunkeld,
11. Z;I
Lauder, W i l l i , the player, 11.39
Lauder the brothers, painters, 11.
89 9: Ill. 83 84
Lauher iamily, +he, 111. 49, 54
Lauder Road 111. 54
Lauderdale. 6uke of. I. 4. 220.11.
11, 22, 28;, 315 316,11~.'15o;i29;
Duchess of IIi. 150, 355
Lauderdale, 'Earls of, I. 90, 182,
111. 149. 258, 265, 334, 365;
Countess of 11. 31
Laudersofth;Bass The, 111.5453
Laurie Gilbert iI.'2a2
1auri;Street k i t h 111. 244
Lauriston Mkrquis Af 111. 110
Lauristo; Lord 111. '111
Lauriston: I. 38: 11. 222, 223, 345,
Lauriston Castle, 111. 110, III, 112,
Lauriston Gardens, 11. 363
Lauriston House, 11. 356
355-3631 370,111. 27,156
113
Lauriston Lane, 11. 121, 362
Lauriston Park, 11. 362
Lauriston Place 11. 6a, 363
Law, the financh sciemer, 11. 39,
111.111 __.. ...
Law of Lauriston John 1.174
Law, William, ~o;d Pro&, 11. a84
Law Courts, Plan of the, 1. * 169
Lawers, Laird of, 111. 29
Lawnmarket, The, I. 79,g4-123,
'75, 253, ZQZ, 295, 310, 31% 313,
314, 366, 11. 82 95, 24a 284 111.
99, 366; fire 'in 1771,' I. '102 ;
views of the I. *104, *'os, *I&
Lawnmarket hub, The, 111. 124
Lawnmarket Gazettes. I. 121. 111. I -,
124
Lawrence, Sir Thomas, 11. 88, 91,
Lawrence, Lady, I. 282
Lawson, Lord Provost, 11. 284
Lawson, James, Knox's successor,
111.77
11. 288. 111. 8
Lawson ;f the Highriggs, Richard,
1.41. 11. 223; Pluvoat, 11. 279
Lawn, Rev. Parker, 111.230,231, ~~ 259,262, 342
Lawsous Mansion-houseof the. 11.
223
" Lay of the Iast Minstrel," The,
111. 145
Lea, Sir Richard, 11. 48, 56
Leannonth Lord Provost, 111. p
Leather &s, 11. 330
Leather trade, Edinburgh the seat
Lee, Principa1,tI. ag, III. 90,179
Lee the actor 11.23 24
Lefivre, Sir J:hn Sha;, 11.84,85,88
Leggat's Land, 111. 75
Leggett Alexander I l l . 82
Letgh i u n t 11. 14; 141
Leigh Sir damuel igerton, 11.159
Leith,'I. 42, 11. 43, *45, 55, 63, 66,
76, 101, 182, zi3, 234, 28% 307,
330, 3547 111. 357 36, 72, 959 132,
133. 1.34. 143. 146, 19, 151. 152 ;
historical survey of the town,
111. 1 6 4 1 ~ ~ ; its charters, Ill.
166 * its early history 111. 166-
198 its subjection td the Edinburgh
magistrates 166-184 :
burnt and pillaged b;theEnglish, 169, I 0, arrival of the French
171 ; tteiortifications, ib. ; arrivai
of the English fleet and army,
174; opening of the batten=,
176; failure of the great assault
177 ; the Queen Regent's death:
177, 178; relics of the siege,
178; the fortificationsdemolished,
16.; landing of Queen Mary
179 ; Leith mortFaged, ld. : Ediu!
burgh takes military passession
of it, ib. ; its history during the
time of James VI. 179-182 ; the
Gowrie conspiracy 182; the
Union Jack, ab . piracy in the
harbour, 183, 1s;'; Leith re-fortified
184. the Covenant signed
186 the 'Cramwellis in Leith:
187; newspapers first printed in
the citadel, 187 ; Tucker's report,
i6. ; the Covenanters transported,
189; English pirates banged,
190, 191; the city during ?he
insurrection of 1715, 191 ; Bngadier
Mackintosh, xg~, 192; the
Duke of Argyle, 192 ; landing of
the Hessian army in 1746, I*;
of the, 11. 26
Highland mutinies 196, 197;
Paul Jones, 1g6, 1'7; mcidents
towards the close 01 the last century,
198 ; the first Scottish MVY
199; old fighting +nvS 0:
Leith, 198-206. their brave exploits,
zos, 206 ;'history of Leith
during the present century, q-
ZIZ ; dexription of the tom and
its neghbourhacd, a13189 (ye
rYbsequont i:cmr concerning
p t h ) ; plan of Leith, 111. *176,
zo5,** 233 ; view of Leith, 1@3,
111. 177; arms of Leith, Ill.
'~b; view of Leith from the
Easter Road, 111. ' 185
Leith and Edinburgh people in the
first years of the nineteenth cen-
Leith and London smacks, and
packet-ships, Ill. 210, 211 ; mtrw
duction ofsteamers 111. a11
Leith, Appearance :f, during the
French war 111. 210
LeithBank ?he 111.154 *236,23Q
Leith, Chakber bf Commk- Ill.
tury, 111. q
245; 288
Leith Dock Commissioners. The. . . 116 283, 288
Leith Docks, 111. 1 8 n 8 . g ; revenues
of, 111.26 ; mew in, 111.
'a85
Leith harbour 111. 2-74 ; entrance
to, Ilk. * 270 ; itscrowded
condition, 111. 273; the signal
tower 111. * 9, *xg, 245, 079:
its apbrance In 1700 111. 173
in 1829 111. *zoo; &-fight in;
III.18;,184;casandwestpiers,
Pbtr 33
Leith High School, 111. 159
Leith Hospital 111.248
Leith ImprovekntScheme,III.z~
Leith Links, I. 330, 331, 11. 11,
309, 344 35% 354,359. 372, 111.
31, 36, 166, 171, 175, '771 '7%
182, 186, 192, 1% 198. 219, '43, drEi, I. 4;. 11. 176,223, 111.
fz68 290
'5'
Leith markets The 111.246
Leith Merchats' dub. 111. zzo Leith MilSIII* & ;, --I
Leith Newspapersir;, 11% 187, 236
LeitiPierand Harbour, 179% PLd# . . .
32
Leith Piers. 111. 208. 071 : the
188, 18% 194, 197,-198;207)22g; * 2 7 ~ ~ 280, 28r, 288, 302
Leith Sands, 111. 267770; executions
there, 111. 267 ; duel
fought there 111. 268; horsennng
there, '111. 268-270
Leith Science School, 111. 270
Leithstage, Travelling by the, 111.
15% 154
17 I 178
Leith Street, I. 364, 11. r q ,
Leiti sugar H O W company,
""e
174
111.
Terrace 111. 152
Leith Walk, 1: s, 87, 180, 11. 178,
III. 94 128, 150-163, 171, 201,
218, 234, 251, 169, 288;
amusements for children, 111.
IFA: exsutions there 111. =SA.
1 3 - ig tlng of the, 111. 152, 1%; its
.. , _... 155,156~~57; itsnunerygmunds,
111. 157 ; new of from Gayfield
Square. 111. *16;; the botanic
garden I. 263 111. g6
Leith Wilk pubk school, Ill. 159
Leith Wynd, I. 38, 195, m7, VI,
2% 294 9 7 9 8 -3% 336.
LeitdWyndPort, I. 43,63, 302
Leiths, The family of, 111. 164
Le Jay, Brian the Templar, 11. 51
Lekprevik, Rhert, the printer, I.
342 11. 17 18: Z& hI. 6,125. 151
215
L~MOX, Duke of, I. 195, 11.
Lennox, 3308 111. Duchess 335 of, I. 305
knnox, Earls of, 1. 4 5 154
186,25~1I. 17.63, 72, 111.
195,246,247, 297
Lennox Street, 111. 71 ... INDEX. 299, 307, 342 ; Lord Provost, 11. 282 283 293' hisfuneral I 155 Kindid, b a d , of Coates ...

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374
*316,317; view below Cramond
Brig, 111. '317
Cramond Bridge, 11. 63, 111. 1x1
CramondChurch 111. 316 '320
Cramond harbou; 111. 31;
Cramond House i11.317,318, *3a2
Cramond Island: 111.315
Cramond Regis, 111. 107, 316
Cramond, Baroness, 111. 315
Cranston, Mn., 111. 161
Cranston Street 11. 17
Cranstoun, Hdn. George, Lord
Corehouse, 11. 6, m7; his
sister 11. .106 111. IOI
Cranstdun, Thd- of, Provost, 11.
278
Cranstoun Geordie thedwarf 11.19
Crawford,'Earls of: I. 62, 68, mg,
Crawford of Jordanhill, Sir Hew,
Crawford'Sir Gregan I.'za
Crawford'of D ~ m s o i 11.181, 111.
11. 354,'III. 194, 222
111. 90- his daughters i6.
zg. 61, IS$ 34
Crawford S l r f V i l l h , 11. 47
Crawford' Captain, and Major
Crawford, S:r John, 111,. 51, 52, 5
Crawford, Thomas, High S c h d
Crawfoid of Jordanhill. Capt.. 111.
somuvhe I. 95
rector II. qa
. _ .
1 9 Crawfurd of Crad.udland, Howie-
CrZC;; j k e s , Provost, 11. a78
Creichtoun of Felde, Deputy Pm
Creighton, Willivn of 11. 47
~ r e e ~ h , william, bo~ise~~er, I. ' 5 5
139 ; portrait of, I. 156 ; Burns'
poem on, i. 156
Crceclr, Lord Provost, and Mh
Burns 11. 158 159
C-h': Land, i. 153. 156 191
"Creech's Levee," I. 156
Crichton, Lord Chancellor, 11. 54
Crichton, Bamn, I. zg, 30, 053
Crichton Castle, 111. 61
Crichton of Lugton, David, 11. 39
Crichton, h. Andrew, 111. 79
Crichtonb Dr. Archbald, 11. 123,
111. 162
Crichton, George, Bishop of Dun.
keld 1. 149 204 11. rj, 47, 48
Crichrbo, Rdhard: architect, 11.94
Crichton of Elliock, Robert, I. 126
Crichton, Lieut.-Col. Patrick, Ill.
161 ; duelhy, 111.16~ ; hisson, d.
Crichton Street, 11. 329, 334 333,
Cr%c%of Brunstane,The,III.xp
Cringletie, Lord, 11. 174
Crisp, Henry, 1. 343
Crispm, Feasts of St., 11. 104
Cruchalh Club, 1. 235, 239, 11.
Cmckat Lieut -General 111 95
Croft-ad-Righ,'m the Gield'of $
cromarty, Earls of, I. 1x1, 11, zg8,
Crombie's Close, 11. 239, 2~
Cromwell, Oher, I. 4, 54, 55. 56,
353. 367, 371. 11. 31, 73. rgz,2~8,
286, 290. 327,367, 375, 383, 111.
186,187, 193, 21% 222, 230, 2s
318,329,33073431 347 ; p r o p 3
statue of 111.72
ter, 1. 34
vost, 11.279
-157, 166, 176, 212, 229, 11. Im
157, 187, 111. IZZ
King, 11. 41, *#
215, 3x0
299. 3532 356 111- 30. I16 2 x 6
741 75, 159, -# %'B 218,227. 298,
439 99, 103, 1x3, 14% 143. 151,
Cromwelrs'tarracks III. 257
'' Crookbacked Dici" of Glouces
Crookshank the historian, I. 101
Crosby, Andrew, advocate, I. 192,
C-4 the City, I. 50, 60, 98, 1x6,
334 11. 2 62.75, 131,111.1~ 72,
146: 755 191. cruel punishments
ihct&l th&e, 1. 150, 151 ;
k q u e t s at the, I. zm; exccuuons
there, 11.14, III.187,268
zm 231.11. IF
122, 146, 152, 195, +03,227, 298,
C T GusewaY, 11. 334, 341, 3451
346
Cross Ke s Tavern I. 251
Cross of &. John iI. z
Cm~~rig, Lord 1.'161, 162, 11. 246
Crown Hotel, h. 118
OLD AND NEW EDINBURGH.
Crown-mom, Edinburgh Castle, I.
Cullayne, Capt. James, I. z6a
Cullen, Lord Robert I. 27, 11. 171
Cullen, Dr., I. 156,'171, 271, 11.
Culloden Battle if &te Battles)
Cumberl;nd, Duke of, I. 332. 334,
* 69
146, 302, 111. 23 35
I. 203 11. 281 111. 15
Cunninglham, si will- 11.153,
Cunnineham of Baberton. House
111. 57
of 11; 162
Curkingham Rev.Dr. 1.87 111.51
Cunninghamk, Dr. deorgk, the
Cunzie House. The, Candlemaker
phycian, 11. 298
. .
Row 11 *= .
CunzidNkk, ?he, 11. 267
Curious dream sto 111. rgz 193
currie, III. 321, ?36; its 1-1
history, 111. 39-333; its ancient
military remaim, 111. 331; the
bridge, III.33?,333; the church,
111. 332; heritors roll of the
parish. 111. 334 : longevity of its
inhabitants, 111. 337
Cnrrie's Close, 11. 236
Currie's Tavern, I. 179
Curriehill. Lord. 11. qm
Curriehil~castle, 111: 334
Currichill How, 11. 01 '' Curses," the Union Bong, I. 164
Custom House, Granton, 111. 14
Custom House, The, Leith, 311.
171. I I, 192, 228, 259, *264, z&
CustomhouxQua ,Lath, 111.273
Cuthbert's Lane, 11: 1.38
D
DArcy, Lady Camlime, 11. ~9
?+r Lord I 274
D+y Rmirw The I. 288 2@
Dalelcish. Bot'hwelis accokdia in
Dak Bailie Duff," 11. 255
Dm-le3smurder 1.263 f11. 6 6
Dalgleish, Nicol kinis& of St.
Cuthbert's Chukh, 11.131
Dalgleish'sClose I. z q 252
Dalhousie, Earl bf, I. :s+, 11. 26,
98, 166, 318, 111. 342 ; Countess
of 11. 318
DalLouie Marquis of 111. 88
Dalkeith, hlsof.11. &, 111. d g .
282,.311
Dalkeith, 11.236, 283, zg1,327, 111.
Dalieith House 111. 146
Dalkeith railwa;, I. 384
Dalkeith Road, 11. 346, 355, 111.
Dalmeny Park, 111. III
Dalry burn, 11. 347
Dalry, Uistrict of, 11.213, 216,217,
Dalry manor-house, II.*217,III. 78
Dalry Road 11. 214 216 217 218
Dalrynple, bavid, iard'Wdthall,
Dalrymple, Hugh,LadDNmmore,
Dalrymple, Sir David, I. 17ir 172,
Dalrymple Sir Hew, 111. 262, 340
Dalrympld Sir James, 11. 327
Dalrymple: Sir John, 11. 26, 86,
Dalrymple Sir Robert, 11. 143
DalrympldofCastleton, Sir Robert,
Dalrymple of Cousland, 11. 348
Dalrymple, William, 11. 293
Dalrymple, Ca t Hugh, 11. 231
WIrymple, JoRn of, Provost, II.
Dalymple, John, Provost, 11. 282,
DalrympL of Stair I. 62 111. 323
Dalrymple, Lady, iI. 342
Ilaliymple's Yard I. 219
Dalyell Sir John braham 11. r6a
Dalyell((or Dalrell), Sir Tiomas, I.
12,334; town mansion of, 11. 19
Dancing girl, Sale of a, I. 201
6r 134, 364
51, 57
111. 27, 35, 9a
I. 222
I. 251
11. 243s 366
272, 335
I. 276
278
I1 . 36
a4 161, m, 378, 11: 75, 354, 111.
Dancing school, The first, m Leith,
Danube Street, 111. 72, 79
Darien Company, 111. 190 ; office
Darien &edition, The, 111. 190
Darien House, 11. 323, 324, *325,
Dark ageofEdinburgh, I. 187,111.
Dark Pit The I. 6g
111. 231
of the 11. 322
326
126
116, 168, m.( 107, 276, 11. 18, 27,
Queen Mary and, I. 46 ; murder
of lI.jw,71 III.~--;r,m,23;emd
l m i n g o f i i s w y , 11.71, 111.7
Dasses The 11. 313
David k., 1. ;r, ~ 2 ~ 7 8 . 148,14g, 186:
II.&,III. 86, 26 339, 346,
legendof the d ? ? Z H k , 11.21,
22, 2% 42, 111. 19; charter of
H o l y r d Abbey, 11. 42, 43, 80,
David II., I. &, zk, 11. 3, 47, 53,
9+ '3% 3=5.3=7, 33'. 338, 354
Dand's miraculous cross, King,
11. #
David's Tower, Edinburgh Castle,
1. 26, 33 34, 36,*2# 44? 4% 48,49r
77 a ~i SS
Daad.& 2 Muirhouse 111. 316
Davidson's Close. 11. zi
D-b,'Lord' 1. 45.46. 47, 50, 78,
35, ~ 8 ~ 6 % 67,G% 74,286,III. 59 ;
180 111. 1x5 166 247
. 5 6 58, 278, 3% 111- 35, 41. 421
Davidson's Hook, Ca-tle Hill, I. 55
Davidson's Mains, 111. IIO
Davit: IJeans' Cottage, 1. 383, 384,
11. 310
Dawick, Laud of, I. 1%
Dawney Douglas's Tavern, I. 235 ;
the"CrownRwm,"ib.; lintelof
dqorway is, two views, 1. 235,
236
Dawson the comedian 11.24.
~ean damnia~ family 'of, II. 134
Dean: or Dene, Village of, I. 183,
3591 111- 62,633 642 66, 67, I*
Dean Bank 111.75- theeducaUonaI
institution III. 6
Dean Bridg;, I. 10, 111. 6 3 , y 70,
71, Pkte ZJ ; Roman urn onnd
near, 1,. xo
Dean Bndge Rcad, 111. 82
Dean cemetery, I. 218, IL am, -1
111. 63, 66, 68, '6g
Dean Church 111.67
Dean Farm iII. 67
Dean Haugh I. 366 II.28qIII. 65
Dean manoAhouse: 111. *65, 68;
h a n Orphan H q i t a l , HI. SI
Dean Path 111. 67
Dean Side,'III. 67
Dean Street, 111. 77
Dean Street Church: fh. 75
Dean T e n a a 111. 72,7
Deanhaugh Sireet, Stak%ridge, 11.
Deemster '$he (executioner), 1. ?42
Defencelhss state of the Fifeshire
-3t aftertheunion, III.194,197
DefenceJ of Leith,The, 111. zgc-zg5
De Foe, Daniel I. 216 zp, 11. 79
Degraver, Dr. Pierre, 1. 1x5
Deidchack The I. I 6
Denham, S'u J&es gtewart, 111.
its owners, III.66,67
Ij8, II1. 5, 79
146, 342
Denham, the actor, I. 350
Denham's Land, 11. 324, 325
Dental Hospitaland School, 11. 276
Derby, Countess of, mistress of
Charles II., 11. zr
Desmond Earls of I. 104
Destitute' Childred, Home for, 11.
26
Devil Legend of raising the, 11. 3
nevits Elbow The I. 7'
pwar's Close: 11. 6
Diamond Beetle &se: The j r r
Sesprit of 11. 207
Dick, Sir A l h d e r , 11. 86, 111.57,
1x4
Dick, Sir James, Lord Provost, I.
Dick of Grange, The family of,
Dick fa%,, The, 111. 114
Dick, Lady Anne, Strange habits
111.
of I 254, 111. 114 (rct Royston,
Lbrd)
Dick-Cunningham family 111. 56
Dickens, Charles, in Edinburgh, 11.
Dickison of Winkston. House of
'50
Digges, 3'0 the Zomeddian, I. 34% 343,
11. 23, z4, 111. 241
Dilettanti Socie The I. 108
Dingwall, Lord,?? z62,'III. 62
Dingwall Sir John I. 340
Dingwalis Castle, f. 340, 353
Dirleton Lord, 111. 318, 348
Dirom Colonel 11. 120, 174
Dirtyklub Th; 111. 12
Disruption'of d e Scottist Church,
11. 95, 96, 138, 1441 '45, m.5, 111-
Di%nterr Various sectsof, 111. p
Distress oi the Edinburgh poor UI
Dobdl Sydney 111. 148
Dock gtreet d i t h 111. 255
Dock Place,'Leith,'lII. 259
Doctors of Faculty Club, 111. 123
Dominicanmanasre lI.z50,~8+'
Darnley's body k n d in th;
gardensof 11. 286 288
Don, Sir Aixander,' 11. 159, 111.
1795 11. 283
339
Don, Si William, the actor, I. 351
Don, Lad I1 343, 111. 95
Donacha ha; 1.136
Donaldson'a dospital, I. 318, 11.
Do~ldson's Close. I. 318
Donalds~n, Dr. James, 11. 112, 126
Donaldson, the bookseller, 1. 3x8;
Donaldson. the theatrical author. 1.
214 PMC 10
hw son Jams, 1. 18, 11.214
DOMldSOll, Capt., d. 153
343,. y 5 '
DonnibnstleCastle, I. 246,III.11~
302
Eoo Park, 111. 37
Doubling the Cap," 111. 125
Douglas, Duke of I. 105, 14a, 11.
331, 354 351; buchess of, 11.
351, 111. 124
Douglas, Marquis of, 11. 3x7
Douglas, Earls Of, 2% 30. 31r34r 3%
old mansion ofthr. 11. 257
38. 39. 4 3 43. 258, 111. 133, 338 ;
Douglag Archibald, 'Earl d-Angus,
Douglas,.&hiba?d, Marquis, I I. 350
IJou~Is, Archbald Earl uf, 11.
Provost 11. 27
331,111. 3.2
Douglas, James Marquis of 11. 351
Douglas, James, Earl of harton,
DougL, Sir Archibald, I. 196
Douglas, Sir Archubald and Si
Dounlas. Sir Georee. I. 106
I1 80
Robert, 11. 59
Douglas' Sir am& '11. 283
Douglas' Sir keil, iI. 153
Douglas: Sir Rotprt, the historian.
I. I28,II. 35,37,1I1.11gr 318,348,
301
Douglac of Brackhouse, The family
~odg~as ofcave- I. 271
Douglas ofGlenbervie, Sir Willii,
Douglas of Hawthornden 111. 27
Douglas oCHawthornden,'Sir JoL,
Douglas of Hyvelie William, 111.34
Douglas of Kilspiddie Archibald,
Provost, 11. a79, do; begs the
royal intercession, 11. 280
Douglas of Parkhead, Sir James,
1. 54 I95
Douglas of Parkhead. George, the
murderer of Rizzio, I. 9, 11. 74
235; Provost, 11. 280
Douglas Ladylsabell I 97
Douglas'pcerage, The,?. 98,349--
Douglascs and Hamiltons, Feuds
Dough? of Spott 111. 330
DouglaqofWhitt:nghame, William,
of 111. 193, 315
11. 279, 111. 53
111. 354
35'
between the, 11. 63, 279, 285
1. 259,161 ... view below Cramond Brig, 111. '317 Cramond Bridge, 11. 63, 111. 1x1 CramondChurch 111. 316 ...

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6 OLD AND NEW EDINBURGH. [Canongate
attendants to say such prayers by her bedside as ? the seventeenth century, and the lofty buildings on
were fitting for a person not expected to survive a
mortal disorder.
? He ventured to remonstrate, and observed that
her safe delivery warranted better hopes; but he
was sternly commanded to obey the orders first
given, and with difficulty recollected himself
sufficiently to acquit himself of the task imposed
on him, He was then again hurried into the chair ;
but as they conducted him down-stairs he heard
the report of a pistol! He was safely conducted
home, and a purse of gold was forced upon
him; but he was warned at the same time
that the least allusion to this dark transaction
would cost him his life. He betook himself to
rest, and after long and broken musing, fell into a
deep sleep. From this he was awakened with the
dismal news that a fire of uncommon fury had
broken out in the house of -, near the head of
the Canongate, and that it was totally consumed,
with the shocking addition that the daughter of the
proprietor, a young lady eminent for beauty and
accomplishments, had perished in the flames. The
clergyman had his suspicions ; but to have made
them public would have availed gothing. He was
timid ; the family was of the first distinction; above
all, the deed was done, and could not be amended.
?Time wore away, and with it his terrors; but
he became unhappy at being the solitary depositary
-of this fearful mystery, and mentioned it to some
of his brethren, through whom the anecdote
acquired a sort of publicity. The divine had long
been dead when a fire broke out on the same spot
where the house of - had formerly stood, and
which was now occupied by buildings of an inferior
description. When the flames were at their height,
the tumult that usually apends such a scene was.
suddenly suspended by an unexpected apparition.
A beautiful female in a nightdress, extremely rich,
but at least half a century old, appeared in ,the
very midst of the fire, and uttered these tremendous
words in her vernacular idiom :-? Anes bumeddwice
burned-the third time 1?11 scare you all ! ?
The belief in this story was so strong, that on a
fire breaking out, and seeming to approach the
fatal spot, there was a good deal of anxiety testified
lest the apparition should make good her denunciation.?
I
According to a statement in Nates and Queries,
this story was current in Edinburgh before the
childhood of Scott, and the murder part of it
was generally credited, He mentions a person
acquainted with the city in 1743 who used to tell
ithe tale and point out the site of the house. It is
Remarkable that a great fire did happen there in
.
the spot date from that time.
Of the plague, which in 1645 nearly depopu- .
lated the Canongate as well as the rest of Edinburgh,
a singular memorial still remains, a little lower
down the street, on the north side, in the form of
a huge square tenement, called the Morocco Land,
from the effigy of a turbaned Moor, which projects
from a recess above the second floor, and having
an alley passing under it, inscribed with the following
legend :-
? MISERERE MEI, DOMINE : A PECCATO, PKOBRO,
DEBITO, ET MORTE SUBITA. LIBERA ~~1.6.18.?
Of the origin of this edifice various romantic stories
are told: one by Chambers, to the effect t5at a
young woman belonging to Edinburgh, having been
taken upon the sea by an African rover, was sold
to the harem of the Emperor of Morocco, whose
favourite wife she became, and enabled her brother
to raise a fortune by merchandise, and that in
building this stately edifice he erected the black
nude figure, with turban and necklace of beads, as
a memorial of his royal brother-in-law; but the
most complete and consistent outline of its history
is that given by Wilson in his ? Memorials,? from
which it would appear that during one of the
turnults which occurred in the city after the accession
of Charles I., the house of the Provost, who had
rendered himself obnoxious to the rioters, was
assaulted and set on fire. Among those arrested as a
ringleader was Andrew Gray, a younger son of the
Master of Gray, whose descendants inherit the
ancient honours of Kinfauns, and who, notwithstanding
the influence of his family, was tried, and
sentenced to be executed on the second day
thereafter.
On the very night that the scaffold was being
erected at the Cross he effected his escape from
the City Tolbooth by means of a rope conveyed
to him by a friend, who had previously given some
drugged liquor to the sentinel at the Puir-folkspurses,
and provided a boat for him, by which he
crossed the North Loch and fled beyond pursuit.
Time passed on, and the days of the great civil
war came. ? Gloom and terror now pervaded the
streets of the capital. It was the terrible pear
1645-the last visitation of the pestilence to Edinburgh-
when, as tradition tells us,? says Wilson,
?grass grew thickly .about the Cross, once as
crowded a centre of thoroughfare as Europe could
boast of.?
The Parliament was compelled to sit at Stirling,
and the Town Council, on the 10th of April,
agreed with Joannes Paulitius, M.D., that he
should visit the infected at a salary of AS0 Scot ... OLD AND NEW EDINBURGH. [Canongate attendants to say such prayers by her bedside as ? the seventeenth century, ...

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THE ROYAL INFIRMARY. 299 h6rmary Street]
students to witness surgical operations. The Infirmary
has separate wards for male and female
patients, and a ward which is used as a Lock
hospital ; but even in ordinary periods the building
had become utterly incompetent for the service
of Edinburgh, and during the prevalence of an epidemic
afforded but a mere fraction of the required
accommodation, and hence the erection of its magnificent
successor, to which we shall refer elsewhere.
The Earl of Hopetoun, in 1742, and for the last
twenty-five years of his life, generously contributed
A400 per annum to the institution when it was
young and struggling. In 1750 Dr. Archibald Kerr
of Jamaica bequeathed to it an estate worth
E218 11s. 5d. yearly; and five years afterwards
the Treasury made it a gift of jG8,ooo j yet it has
never met with the support from Government. that
it ought to have done, and which similar institutions
in London receive.
But the institution owed most of its brilliant
success to Lord Provost Drummond. Among his
associates in this good work he had the honoured
members of the Colleges of Physicians and Surgeons
in Edinburgh, ever first in all works of goodness and
charity; and the first Dr. Munro, Professor of
Anatomy, was singularly sanguine of the complete
success of the undertaking.
That portion of the house which was founded by
the Earl of Cromarty was opened for the reception
of patients in December, 1741. The theatre described
was made to serve the purposes also of a
chapel, and twelve cells on the ground floor, for cases
of delirium fremens, being found unnecessary, were
converted into kitchens and larders, &c. The
grounds around the house, consisting of two acres,
and long bounded on- the south by the city wall,
were laid out into grass walks for the convalescents,
and ultimately the house was amply supplied with
water from the city reservoir.
In the years 1743-4 the sick soldiers of the
regiments quartered in the Castle were accommodated
in the Infirmary; and in the stormy
period of the '45 it was of necessity converted into
a great military hospital for the sick and wounded
troops of both armies engaged at Prestonpans and
elsewhere ; and in I 748 the surgeon-apothecaries,
who since 1729 had given all manner of medical
aid gratis, were feed for the first time. Wounded
from our armies in Flanders have been sent there
for treatment.
In 1748, after paying for the site, building,
furniture, &c., the stock of the institution amounted
to &5,00o; and sick patients not wishing to be resident
were invited to apply for advice on Mondays
and Fridays, and were in cases of necessity
admitted as supernumeraries at the rate of 6d. per
day. About this time there was handed over an
Invalid Grant made by Government to the city,
on consideration of sixty beds being retained for
the use of all soldiers who paid 4d. per diem for
accommodation, This sum, &3, 2 70, was fully made
over to the managers, who, for some time afteqfound
themselves called upon to entertain so many military
patients, that a guard had to be mounted on
the house to enforce order; and liberty was obtained
to deposit all dead patients in Lady Yester's
churchyard, on the opposite side of the street.
Hitherto the physicians had, with exemplary
fidelity, attended the patients in rotation j but in
January, 1751, the managers on being empowered
by the general court of contributors, selected Dr.
David Clerk and Dr, Colin Drummond, physicians
in ordinary, paying them the small honorarium of
;E30 annually.
The University made offer to continue its
services, together with those of the ordinary physicians,
which offer was gladly accepted; and
though the practice fell into disuse, they were long
continued in monthly rotation. To the option of
the two ordinary physicians was left the visiting
of the patients conjointly, or by each taking his
own department. "It was their duty to sign the
tickets of admission and dismission. In case of any
unforeseen occurrences or dangerous distemper, the
matron or clerks were permitted to use this authe
rity ; the physicians en their amval, however, were
expected to append their signatures to the tickets.
The good and economy of the house from the first,
induced the managers to appoint two of their
number to visit the institution once every month,
who were enjoined to inquire how far the patients
were contented with their treatment, and to note
what they found inconsistent with the ordinary
regulations : their remarks to be entered in a book
of reports, to come under review at the first meeting
of managers." (" Journal of Antiq.," VoL 11.)
In 1754 some abuses prevailed in the mode of
dispensing medicines to the out-door patients,
detrimental to the finances ; an order was given for
a more judicious and sparing distribution. In the
following pear application was made to the Town
Council, as well as to the Presbytery of the Church,
to raise money at their several churches to provide
a ward for sick servants-which had been found
one of the most useful in the house. From its
first institution the ministers of the city had, in
monthly rotation, conducted the religious services ;
but in the middle of 1756 the managers appointed
aregular chaplain, whose duty it was to preach
every Monday in the theatre for surgical operations. ... ROYAL INFIRMARY. 299 h6rmary Street] students to witness surgical operations. The Infirmary has separate ...

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GENERAL INDEX. 371
Black Watch, 11. 89, 138, 149, 179.
Black Wigs ClLb, 111. 123
Blackwood, Hnilie, 111. 15
Blackwood, William, I. 157, 291,
11. 139, 141, 142 ; the saloon in
his establinhment, 11. * 141 ; his
rrsidence, 111. 50
BfacA-wood's Mapasiw, 1. 339, 11.
322, 111. 195 288
23; ;Fa# ;2; ;7;g; 1.g WirZtors
11.140 IIP. 74
Blair,' Sir Jdmes Hunter, Lord
Provost, I. 179, 373, 376, 11. 283,
111. 89
Blair of Avontoun. Lord President.
236, 2 , II:27, 29, 120, 161, 271,
Blair Street, I. 245, 376, 11. 231,
Blarquhan Laird of 111. 36
BIair's Cl&, I. 65. & 11. 329 ;the
Duke of Gordon's house, 1. *p
Blairs of Balthayock, Tom-house
ofthe 11. 139
Blanc, kippolyte J., architect, 111.
38
Bland, the comedian, I. 342, 343
Blaw Wearie 111. 305
Bkis-sifwr, ?he gratuity, 11. 290,
383, 119. 45, 1 3 6 ~ 2 ~
Zj8,III. I
291
Blew Stone The I. 79
Blind Schdl, Cdigmillar, 11. 336
Blockhouse of St. Anthony. Leith.
111. 222, "23
J'Blue Blanket," The, I. 34, '36,
43, 11. 262, 278, 111. 55
Blumenreich, Herr, 111.88
Blyth's Close, 1. ga, 111. 66
Bmk's Land, West Port, I. 224
Boar Club The 111. IW
Board of Manuiactnres, 11. 8 3 4 6 ,
Body-snatchers Early 11. 1.w
B o ~ l l y , R o d n ci& near, 111.
Bo%l?yTower 111. 326 "328
Bonham, Sir Galter. II.'57
Bonkel Sir Edward I. 304
Bonnet'birds' club', 111.123
Bonnet-makers The 11. 265
Bonnington, n&r Le'ith, 11.~5,III.
W. ,306 ; view in, 111. * 96
Bonntngton House, 111. 88, 91,
*93, 147
Bonnington Mill, 111. 90, 247
Bonniugton Road, l I I . 8 8 , 1 2 8 , 1 ~ ,
Bonnington Sugar-refining Com-
Bonnyhaugh 111.90 gr
Bordeaux, &c de,Hr Holyrood,
Boreland homas the pcssessor of
the k&g$ stable, 11. 225; his
house I. * 80 1I.a25,n6
Bore-s&e or hare-stone, The, I.
326, 111. 28
Bomwlaski, ;he '8o?i;h dwarf, 11.
166.167
Borthwick, Lord, I. 40, 262, 11.383,
Borthwick, Jam- 11. 383
Borthwick's Close, I. 190, 211, 242
BosweIl, Sir Alexander, 1.173.182,
88, 92, 186
'7'1 '84
pany, Leith, 111. 91. 236
11. 78, 7%
Ill. 348
2x39 243.258
101, 18% 299911. 66, 143 255 339
ifs9 ; Lord hlacaulay s :pinion 01
his father and mother, 'jq; o n.wn's visit to Edinburgh,
I. z 9, IIL.57, 291, 35a
Bormll Raj, Wardte, Ill. 308
Boswell's Court, I.
Botanical gardenq, %e, I. 362,363,
Bothwell, Earfs of,' I. 94 122, 168,
Bo=vell, Jam=, I. 6 8 3 , 97, 98, 99,
111. 159, 161 162 163
196, 106, m7, 209, 2 1 0 ~ 2 4 ~ ~ 258,
259, 266, 276, 298, 3741 11. 61, 71,
72 111. 3 6,7, 52, 6 1 , ~ ~ 174,
33; ; Lord fi arnlefs murder 111.
3-7 * marruge of Queen kary
to the Earl of, I. 219. 11. 71,
262; how Bothwell attracted the
Queen's notice, 11. 102
Rothwell, Adam, Bishop of Orkney,
I. 116, q, 11. 48, 49, 71,
181, 111. 35, 98
Bothwell, ohn Lord, 11. 49
Hothwell, Air Francis, 111. 35
Hothwell, ohn I 47 158
Hothwell AichArd, PAvost of Kirk-
Bothwell of Glencorse, Henry, I. pa
Bothwell Bridge, 11. 39, 87. 375
Bottle House Company, Leith, 111.
Bough, Samuel, the artist, 11. 86,
Boulder, Gigantic, 11. 312
Bourse, The, Leith, 111. 231; its
other names, ib.
Bower, the historian of Edinburgh
University, 111. 8, 9. 10. 11, 16,
of-Fielh, 111. 2
239
Ill. 68
. .
18 19, 308
BokFoot, The, 11. 13'
Rowfoot Well. I. 310 11. 233
Bowles, Caroline, 11.'-
Boyd, Lord, 111. 174, 180
Boyd Sir Thomas nmtewn, Lord
Bo d, J o k , Slaubhter of'the ruf-
PrdVOSt 11. 284 i11.88 288
Ln. 11. a
4 4 $1, 4 ,'326, a;i, 347, fi.- . "Braid dugh Somewilk of the
Writes " 1. 315, 16
Braid, L i r d of, IIt. 49
Braid The river 111. 143, 322
Braid'Village o< 111. to, 113 ;ex*
c d o n near, 1iI. 40; its historical
asxiations, 111. 41
Braid's Row 111. 75
Braidsbum, 'I. 326, 111. 49, 61, 327
Brand, Sir Alexander, I. m3, 378,
Brandof Baberton, Alexander, 111.
Brandfield P h 11.218
Brandfield Stree; 11. ar
Braxfield, Lord, i, 173, 11. 152,153,
Bread. Sale of. determined bv law.
11.21
334
339 . . 11.;80 '
Brea&lbe Earlof 1.378 I11 146
Breadalbani Marqkis of,'II.'86;
Breadalbme Stdet. Leith. 111. ax.
Marchion& of 11. zog
. . _ _ 236
II.84,111.2 9
Breakwater,TheNewhaven III.303
Bremner, David, 1. 283, 384,
Brewers, The &inburgh, 11. 68
Brewster, Sir David, 1.379,II. 140,
f57,III. q, 242: statueof 111.24
Brilxs, Acceptance of, by'judgea
and others, 1. 163, 164, 167,169
Brickfield, 111. 144
Bridewell, The, 11. 106, IT
Bridge-end, 111. 58
Bridges, Sir Egerton, I. 273
Bridges David, cloth merchnot,
Bright, John, M.P., 11. 284
Brighton Chapel, 11. 326
Brighton Place, Portobello 111.148
Hrlsbane, Sir T., Father d 11. 199
Bristo, 11. 135, 267, w, Ilt. 94
Bristo Park 11. 326
Bristo Port,'I. 38, 11. 234, 267, 316,
T3t.3249 325, 3 4 '32% 3Pp 379,
Brisro Street, I. 335, 11. 326.327,
I. I ~ ' - I I O ; his wife, I. 110
11. 94, 156
British Convention, The, 11. 236 ;
British Linen Company, I. a79.280,
11s governors and patrons, 1. 279
British Linen Co.'s Bank, Edinburgh
11 170 171, 172; at
Leith'III'z38 '23
British h e ; Hail, &nongate, 11.
31, 33, 83
xilure of its members, id.
355, 11. 33, 93, '731 '74, 111.344;
Broadstairs House, Causewayside,
Broad Wknd, Leith, 111. 167, 210,
111. 50 "52
236,238
Brodie, Deacon, Robberies cammitted
by, I. 1 1 s r 1 5 * 116. 217,
11.23, Ill. 3t7: lantein and keys
used by I. 115 : execution of,
1. 1x5 ; herview between Bmdie
and Smith, 1. * 117; his method
of robbery 11. 23
Brodie William the sculptor, I. 159,
Brodie s klos; 1.112
Brwke, Gnsdvus V., the actor, I.
357
Brwm Stock of, I. 377
Bmugham, Lord, I. 166, 379, 11.
i11 113 157 I 287, 292.347,
111: y :his b k a a c e , I. 168; his
mother, I. 168, 242 ; burial-place
nfhisfathcr,lII. 131 ; his statue,
1. I59
Bmughton, 1.335,II.3,191,III. 151
Broughton, Barony of, 11. I&
185, 186, 366,111. 83 86 I
Bmughton Hum in 1850, 184
Broughton Hall, Ill. 88, * 93
Broughton Loan, 11. E+ 115, 176,
Broughton Park, 111. 88
Broughton Place, 11. 183, 184
Broughton Street, 11. 178, 179, 183,
11. ;30 155 ill. 68,101
I&, 186, 188
184
Broughtan T o l b t h , The, 11. * 181
Broughton loll, 111. 95
Bronnga, John, the Nevhaven
Brown CaGt. Sir ?&uel, 111. 303
Brown: George, the builder, 11. 2%
B m . Thomas. architect. 11. IOI
hsherman 111. 5 p 6
~ m m ; Rev. Alexander, irr. 75-
Brown, Rev. Dr., 111. 51
Brown Square, 1. g1.11.260,268,
269, 274 =71r 339
Broww, Dr. James, I. 190, 339,II.
1 4 314, 111. 79
Browne Dr. Thomas, 11.395
Browndll, Williim, the naval adventurer,
I I I . I ~ ,
Rrownhill, the builder, 1. 98
Brown's Chapel (Or. John), Rose
Street, 11. 15 , 184
Brown's close 1. 8: p
Brown's taveA, Lkkgate Leith
111. 914 ; singular tragedy in, ib:
Browns of Greenbank, The, I. go
Hruce Lord 11. 354
Bruce: Sir hiichael 11. 168
BNC~ of Balcaskd and Kinross,
Sir William architect of Holyrood
Palace'l. 336 11. 74, 367
Bruce. Robe;. Lord Kennrtt. 11.
242
Rruce, Robert, sword of, 111. 355
Hruce Lady 111. 158
nruce'of RiAng's mansion, I. 2-4
Bruce of Kinnaird, the traveller, 1.
247, 111,162
Brucr of Kinloss, Lady, 11. 257
Rruce of Powfoulis Mrs 11. 16a
Bruce Michael, th: Sco;;ish Kirke
White, 111. 219
B ~ c e ' s Close, I. 223
Brunstane, 11. 34
Hrunstane Rum 111. 149
Brunstane, Laid of, 111. 150
Brunstane manor-house, 111. 149,
1509 Tl579.366
Brunsmck btmt, 111. 81
Hruntan Dr. I. 79 111. 83
Brunton'Pla& 191.
Bruntsfield Links, 11. 115,137, 222,
313, 348, 111. q~ 34 31, 33, 43 ;
the avenue 111. '33
Bruntsfield dr Warrender House,
Bryce, David, thearchitect, 11. 95,
97, 154 174 210, 359, 111. 82
Rryce John architect 11. 359
Brysoh Rodert 1.37;
Yuccle;ch, D&s of, 11. 21, 86,
211, 9 3 , 318, 358, 111. 198, 2x9,
d37 265, 270, F, 30% 311, 3r4 ;
Duchessof 11.115
Bucckuch, Hemy Duke of, 11. 310
Buccleuch Lady of 1. z06
Buccleuch'Free ChArch, 11. 346
Buccleuch Place, 11. 148, a68, 347,
Bucckoch Street, II. 339
111. 45,46, *48,
Ill. '25
Buchan, Earl of, 1. 34, 11. 8 6 , s ~
1% 2% 339, 111. 2s 123, 1%
180, 314
Buchanaii, George, I. 16, 143, 167,
206, ~ 5 . *4, 11. 67. 127. 363
111. 14 179, 19. -1, 998,363.
memorial window in new Greyfriars
Church, 11. 379
Bnchanan, lk. k'raocis, botanist,
111. 1-52
Buchanan of Auchintorlie, 11.159
Buchanan Street, 111. 15
Buckingham Tenace, 119. 67
Bnckstane The 111. 342
Buildings 'in Edinburgh, Ancient
laws regulating the I. rl
Bull, Capture of Sir 'Stephen, 111.
Bullock, William ; his plan for the
re-capture of Edinburgh Castle,
202
I. 25, 26.
Bunker's Hill, I. $6
Burdiehoux, 111. 342; fossil dLcoveries
near, id. .
Burdiehouse Burn 111. 322, 339
Burgess Close, Leith, 111.164 167.
Burgh Loch,The, 11. zgc, 346, 347,
Burg Loch Brewery, 11.349
Burphmuir. The. 1. U. ~ O A . ?I&
227, 232, 234, 249
* q 9 , 354
33r 326, >a3, iiL;;
35 170 342; muster of troops
udder jam- 111. and James IV.,
Ill. 28. the k - s c a n e , 111.~8,
* z g ; :dud in 17za, 111. p;
Valleyfield House and Leven
Ledge, id.; Barclay Freechurch,
76.; Hruntsfield Links and the
Golf clubs, ib. ; Gillespie's Hospital,
111. & *37: M e r c h w
Castle, ILI. 9% P**r 26
Burghmuir, Dlstrict of the, 111. q
-y ; battle of the (see Battles)
Burghmuir-head mad, 111. 38; thc
Free Church, i6.
Burial-ground, The first, in =inburgh,
I. 149
Burials under church porticoes, 11.
247
Burke and Hare, the murderers L
Im, 11. 226-230, Ill. 27
Burleigh Lord 1.127 ; escape from
the l.oiboot$ ib.
Burn, Willkm the architect, 11.
171, 111. 34 b8 85 255
Burnet, Jamei oith: TownGuud.
11.311
Burnet, Sir Thomas, 11. 147
Burnet of Monboddo, Miss, I. iq.
111.42
Burney, Dr the musician 11. zg
Burning of'ihe Pope in ;figy by
the Universitystudents, 111. II-
13. 57
Burns, Robert, I. 3,106, 107, 11g.
IW 154 171, 178, 17% 232,236.
I Y, 159, 187, 188, wl 27, 333
2397 348, 366, 11. p4 27. 307 3%
191. 42, 55, 161, 352 ; Ftxman s
statne of, 11.88, 110; Nasmyth's
y t r a i t of, 11. @ ; monument of,
1. 11% *IIZ; bust by Brodi,
11. 110: head Or, 11. 127
Bums' centenary The first 11.150
Burns, Colonel W. Nicol, &e poet's
son 11. Sg
Burn:, Miss, and Bailie Crcech, II. '
Bnrniisland, I. 58,111.180, 188,191,
158, 159
211,314
Burtou, Ur. John Hill, I. 98, 111.
42, 43; his literary work.. 111.
'
43
able article, 11. 219
86,111. 13:
Butcher meat formerly an unsale-
Bute, Earl of, 1. 164, 179, 272, 11.
Bute, Marquis of, 11. 346
Bute's Battery, 1. 78
Butler, John, the king's carpenter,
Butter Tron, The, I. 50,
thtters of F'itlochry, %'Le, 11.
11. 136
5 218
143
Byres, Sir John, I. 153, 219, 11-GENERAL INDEX. 371
Black Watch, 11. 89, 138, 149, 179.
Black Wigs ClLb, 111. 123
Blackwood, Hnilie, 111. 15
Blackwood, William, I. 157, 291,
11. 139, 141, 142 ; the saloon in
his establinhment, 11. * 141 ; his
rrsidence, 111. 50
BfacA-wood's Mapasiw, 1. 339, 11.
322, 111. 195 288
23; ;Fa# ;2; ;7;g; 1.g WirZtors
11.140 IIP. 74
Blair,' Sir Jdmes Hunter, Lord
Provost, I. 179, 373, 376, 11. 283,
111. 89
Blair of Avontoun. Lord President.
236, 2 , II:27, 29, 120, 161, 271,
Blair Street, I. 245, 376, 11. 231,
Blarquhan Laird of 111. 36
BIair's Cl&, I. 65. & 11. 329 ;the
Duke of Gordon's house, 1. *p
Blairs of Balthayock, Tom-house
ofthe 11. 139
Blanc, kippolyte J., architect, 111.
38
Bland, the comedian, I. 342, 343
Blaw Wearie 111. 305
Bkis-sifwr, ?he gratuity, 11. 290,
383, 119. 45, 1 3 6 ~ 2 ~
Zj8,III. I
291
Blew Stone The I. 79
Blind Schdl, Cdigmillar, 11. 336
Blockhouse of St. Anthony. Leith.
111. 222, "23
J'Blue Blanket," The, I. 34, '36,
43, 11. 262, 278, 111. 55
Blumenreich, Herr, 111.88
Blyth's Close, 1. ga, 111. 66
Bmk's Land, West Port, I. 224
Boar Club The 111. IW
Board of Manuiactnres, 11. 8 3 4 6 ,
Body-snatchers Early 11. 1.w
B o ~ l l y , R o d n ci& near, 111.
Bo%l?yTower 111. 326 "328
Bonham, Sir Galter. II.'57
Bonkel Sir Edward I. 304
Bonnet'birds' club', 111.123
Bonnet-makers The 11. 265
Bonnington, n&r Le'ith, 11.~5,III.
W. ,306 ; view in, 111. * 96
Bonntngton House, 111. 88, 91,
*93, 147
Bonnington Mill, 111. 90, 247
Bonniugton Road, l I I . 8 8 , 1 2 8 , 1 ~ ,
Bonnington Sugar-refining Com-
Bonnyhaugh 111.90 gr
Bordeaux, &c de,Hr Holyrood,
Boreland homas the pcssessor of
the k&g$ stable, 11. 225; his
house I. * 80 1I.a25,n6
Bore-s&e or hare-stone, The, I.
326, 111. 28
Bomwlaski, ;he '8o?i;h dwarf, 11.
166.167
Borthwick, Lord, I. 40, 262, 11.383,
Borthwick, Jam- 11. 383
Borthwick's Close, I. 190, 211, 242
BosweIl, Sir Alexander, 1.173.182,
88, 92, 186
'7'1 '84
pany, Leith, 111. 91. 236
11. 78, 7%
Ill. 348
2x39 243.258
101, 18% 299911. 66, 143 255 339
ifs9 ; Lord hlacaulay s :pinion 01
his father and mother, 'jq; o n.wn's visit to Edinburgh,
I. z 9, IIL.57, 291, 35a
Bormll Raj, Wardte, Ill. 308
Boswell's Court, I.
Botanical gardenq, %e, I. 362,363,
Bothwell, Earfs of,' I. 94 122, 168,
Bo=vell, Jam=, I. 6 8 3 , 97, 98, 99,
111. 159, 161 162 163
196, 106, m7, 209, 2 1 0 ~ 2 4 ~ ~ 258,
259, 266, 276, 298, 3741 11. 61, 71,
72 111. 3 6,7, 52, 6 1 , ~ ~ 174,
33; ; Lord fi arnlefs murder 111.
3-7 * marruge of Queen kary
to the Earl of, I. 219. 11. 71,
262; how Bothwell attracted the
Queen's notice, 11. 102
Rothwell, Adam, Bishop of Orkney,
I. 116, q, 11. 48, 49, 71,
181, 111. 35, 98
Bothwell, ohn Lord, 11. 49
Hothwell, Air Francis, 111. 35
Hothwell, ohn I 47 158
Hothwell AichArd, PAvost of Kirk-
Bothwell of Glencorse, Henry, I. pa
Bothwell Bridge, 11. 39, 87. 375
Bottle House Company, Leith, 111.
Bough, Samuel, the artist, 11. 86,
Boulder, Gigantic, 11. 312
Bourse, The, Leith, 111. 231; its
other names, ib.
Bower, the historian of Edinburgh
University, 111. 8, 9. 10. 11, 16,
of-Fielh, 111. 2
239
Ill. 68
. .
18 19, 308
BokFoot, The, 11. 13'
Rowfoot Well. I. 310 11. 233
Bowles, Caroline, 11.'-
Boyd, Lord, 111. 174, 180
Boyd Sir Thomas nmtewn, Lord
Bo d, J o k , Slaubhter of'the ruf-
PrdVOSt 11. 284 i11.88 288
Ln. 11. a
4 4 $1, 4 ,'326, a;i, 347, fi.- . "Braid dugh Somewilk of the
Writes " 1. 315, 16
Braid, L i r d of, IIt. 49
Braid The river 111. 143, 322
Braid'Village o< 111. to, 113 ;ex*
c d o n near, 1iI. 40; its historical
asxiations, 111. 41
Braid's Row 111. 75
Braidsbum, 'I. 326, 111. 49, 61, 327
Brand, Sir Alexander, I. m3, 378,
Brandof Baberton, Alexander, 111.
Brandfield P h 11.218
Brandfield Stree; 11. ar
Braxfield, Lord, i, 173, 11. 152,153,
Bread. Sale of. determined bv law.
11.21
334
339 . . 11.;80 '
Brea&lbe Earlof 1.378 I11 146
Breadalbani Marqkis of,'II.'86;
Breadalbme Stdet. Leith. 111. ax.
Marchion& of 11. zog
. . _ _ 236
II.84,111.2 9
Breakwater,TheNewhaven III.303
Bremner, David, 1. 283, 384,
Brewers, The &inburgh, 11. 68
Brewster, Sir David, 1.379,II. 140,
f57,III. q, 242: statueof 111.24
Brilxs, Acceptance of, by'judgea
and others, 1. 163, 164, 167,169
Brickfield, 111. 144
Bridewell, The, 11. 106, IT
Bridge-end, 111. 58
Bridges, Sir Egerton, I. 273
Bridges David, cloth merchnot,
Bright, John, M.P., 11. 284
Brighton Chapel, 11. 326
Brighton Place, Portobello 111.148
Hrlsbane, Sir T., Father d 11. 199
Bristo, 11. 135, 267, w, Ilt. 94
Bristo Park 11. 326
Bristo Port,'I. 38, 11. 234, 267, 316,
T3t.3249 325, 3 4 '32% 3Pp 379,
Brisro Street, I. 335, 11. 326.327,
I. I ~ ' - I I O ; his wife, I. 110
11. 94, 156
British Convention, The, 11. 236 ;
British Linen Company, I. a79.280,
11s governors and patrons, 1. 279
British Linen Co.'s Bank, Edinburgh
11 170 171, 172; at
Leith'III'z38 '23
British h e ; Hail, &nongate, 11.
31, 33, 83
xilure of its members, id.
355, 11. 33, 93, '731 '74, 111.344;
Broadstairs House, Causewayside,
Broad Wknd, Leith, 111. 167, 210,
111. 50 "52
236,238
Brodie, Deacon, Robberies cammitted
by, I. 1 1 s r 1 5 * 116. 217,
11.23, Ill. 3t7: lantein and keys
used by I. 115 : execution of,
1. 1x5 ; herview between Bmdie
and Smith, 1. * 117; his method
of robbery 11. 23
Brodie William the sculptor, I. 159,
Brodie s klos; 1.112
Brwke, Gnsdvus V., the actor, I.
357
Brwm Stock of, I. 377
Bmugham, Lord, I. 166, 379, 11.
i11 113 157 I 287, 292.347,
111: y :his b k a a c e , I. 168; his
mother, I. 168, 242 ; burial-place
nfhisfathcr,lII. 131 ; his statue,
1. I59
Bmughton, 1.335,II.3,191,III. 151
Broughton, Barony of, 11. I&
185, 186, 366,111. 83 86 I
Bmughton Hum in 1850, 184
Broughton Hall, Ill. 88, * 93
Broughton Loan, 11. E+ 115, 176,
Broughton Park, 111. 88
Broughton Place, 11. 183, 184
Broughton Street, 11. 178, 179, 183,
11. ;30 155 ill. 68,101
I&, 186, 188
184
Broughtan T o l b t h , The, 11. * 181
Broughton loll, 111. 95
Bronnga, John, the Nevhaven
Brown CaGt. Sir ?&uel, 111. 303
Brown: George, the builder, 11. 2%
B m . Thomas. architect. 11. IOI
hsherman 111. 5 p 6
~ m m ; Rev. Alexander, irr. 75-
Brown, Rev. Dr., 111. 51
Brown Square, 1. g1.11.260,268,
269, 274 =71r 339
Broww, Dr. James, I. 190, 339,II.
1 4 314, 111. 79
Browne Dr. Thomas, 11.395
Browndll, Williim, the naval adventurer,
I I I . I ~ ,
Rrownhill, the builder, 1. 98
Brown's Chapel (Or. John), Rose
Street, 11. 15 , 184
Brown's close 1. 8: p
Brown's taveA, Lkkgate Leith
111. 914 ; singular tragedy in, ib:
Browns of Greenbank, The, I. go
Hruce Lord 11. 354
Bruce: Sir hiichael 11. 168
BNC~ of Balcaskd and Kinross,
Sir William architect of Holyrood
Palace'l. 336 11. 74, 367
Bruce. Robe;. Lord Kennrtt. 11.
242
Rruce, Robert, sword of, 111. 355
Hruce Lady 111. 158
nruce'of RiAng's mansion, I. 2-4
Bruce of Kinnaird, the traveller, 1.
247, 111,162
Brucr of Kinloss, Lady, 11. 257
Rruce of Powfoulis Mrs 11. 16a
Bruce Michael, th: Sco;;ish Kirke
White, 111. 219
B ~ c e ' s Close, I. 223
Brunstane, 11. 34
Hrunstane Rum 111. 149
Brunstane, Laid of, 111. 150
Brunstane manor-house, 111. 149,
1509 Tl579.366
Brunsmck btmt, 111. 81
Hruntan Dr. I. 79 111. 83
Brunton'Pla& 191.
Bruntsfield Links, 11. 115,137, 222,
313, 348, 111. q~ 34 31, 33, 43 ;
the avenue 111. '33
Bruntsfield dr Warrender House,
Bryce, David, thearchitect, 11. 95,
97, 154 174 210, 359, 111. 82
Rryce John architect 11. 359
Brysoh Rodert 1.37;
Yuccle;ch, D&s of, 11. 21, 86,
211, 9 3 , 318, 358, 111. 198, 2x9,
d37 265, 270, F, 30% 311, 3r4 ;
Duchessof 11.115
Bucckuch, Hemy Duke of, 11. 310
Buccleuch Lady of 1. z06
Buccleuch'Free ChArch, 11. 346
Buccleuch Place, 11. 148, a68, 347,
Bucckoch Street, II. 339
111. 45,46, *48,
Ill. '25
Buchan, Earl of, 1. 34, 11. 8 6 , s ~
1% 2% 339, 111. 2s 123, 1%
180, 314
Buchanaii, George, I. 16, 143, 167,
206, ~ 5 . *4, 11. 67. 127. 363
111. 14 179, 19. -1, 998,363.
memorial window in new Greyfriars
Church, 11. 379
Bnchanan, lk. k'raocis, botanist,
111. 1-52
Buchanan of Auchintorlie, 11.159
Buchanan Street, 111. 15
Buckingham Tenace, 119. 67
Bnckstane The 111. 342
Buildings 'in Edinburgh, Ancient
laws regulating the I. rl
Bull, Capture of Sir 'Stephen, 111.
Bullock, William ; his plan for the
re-capture of Edinburgh Castle,
202
I. 25, 26.
Bunker's Hill, I. $6
Burdiehoux, 111. 342; fossil dLcoveries
near, id. .
Burdiehouse Burn 111. 322, 339
Burgess Close, Leith, 111.164 167.
Burgh Loch,The, 11. zgc, 346, 347,
Burg Loch Brewery, 11.349
Burphmuir. The. 1. U. ~ O A . ?I&
227, 232, 234, 249
* q 9 , 354
33r 326, >a3, iiL;;
35 170 342; muster of troops
udder jam- 111. and James IV.,
Ill. 28. the k - s c a n e , 111.~8,
* z g ; :dud in 17za, 111. p;
Valleyfield House and Leven
Ledge, id.; Barclay Freechurch,
76.; Hruntsfield Links and the
Golf clubs, ib. ; Gillespie's Hospital,
111. & *37: M e r c h w
Castle, ILI. 9% P**r 26
Burghmuir, Dlstrict of the, 111. q
-y ; battle of the (see Battles)
Burghmuir-head mad, 111. 38; thc
Free Church, i6.
Burial-ground, The first, in =inburgh,
I. 149
Burials under church porticoes, 11.
247
Burke and Hare, the murderers L
Im, 11. 226-230, Ill. 27
Burleigh Lord 1.127 ; escape from
the l.oiboot$ ib.
Burn, Willkm the architect, 11.
171, 111. 34 b8 85 255
Burnet, Jamei oith: TownGuud.
11.311
Burnet, Sir Thomas, 11. 147
Burnet of Monboddo, Miss, I. iq.
111.42
Burney, Dr the musician 11. zg
Burning of'ihe Pope in ;figy by
the Universitystudents, 111. II-
13. 57
Burns, Robert, I. 3,106, 107, 11g.
IW 154 171, 178, 17% 232,236.
I Y, 159, 187, 188, wl 27, 333
2397 348, 366, 11. p4 27. 307 3%
191. 42, 55, 161, 352 ; Ftxman s
statne of, 11.88, 110; Nasmyth's
y t r a i t of, 11. @ ; monument of,
1. 11% *IIZ; bust by Brodi,
11. 110: head Or, 11. 127
Bums' centenary The first 11.150
Burns, Colonel W. Nicol, &e poet's
son 11. Sg
Burn:, Miss, and Bailie Crcech, II. '
Bnrniisland, I. 58,111.180, 188,191,
158, 159
211,314
Burtou, Ur. John Hill, I. 98, 111.
42, 43; his literary work.. 111.
'
43
able article, 11. 219
86,111. 13:
Butcher meat formerly an unsale-
Bute, Earl of, 1. 164, 179, 272, 11.
Bute, Marquis of, 11. 346
Bute's Battery, 1. 78
Butler, John, the king's carpenter,
Butter Tron, The, I. 50,
thtters of F'itlochry, %'Le, 11.
11. 136
5 218
143
Byres, Sir John, I. 153, 219, 11- ... INDEX. 371 Black Watch, 11. 89, 138, 149, 179. Black Wigs ClLb, 111. 123 Blackwood, Hnilie, 111. ...

Vol. 6  p. 371 (Rel. 0.18)

392
I. 344 341, 111. 158; Foote's
attack on Whitefield I. 342
Whiteford, Sir John, I.'106,~82, 11.
35 166 111. 161
White Hart, Leg&d of the. I. 11,22
White Hart Inn, Grassmarket, The
Whit; Hbrx hot& The, I. 99, 11.
Whik Horse Inn, I. 4, 6, 299.303
White House Loan, 111.43, 46,47,
Whihorh HOW 11. U, 35
old I1 234 235 *237
21 22739
W%e iron smith, h e first, :I. 263
"White Rose of Scotland, The,
Wig Club The 111. 124
Wigan dfred 'the actor, I. 351
W i g h u k , h i d Provost, I. 94
Wigmer, John, 11. 278
Wi ton Earl of 11. 270
Wi&er&rce, William, 11. 336
Wilkes the demagogue 111. 157
Wilkie: Sir David, L ;Os, 11. 89,
Wilkieof Foulden 11. 142
w i l l i III., PrAlamation of, I.
62; unpopularity of, 11. 324;
proposed statue to, 111. 123 : announcement
of the death of, I. 201
W i l l i IV. inLeithRoads, 111.198
W i l l i de Dedervk. alderman, 11.
11. 123
po7.337~ 111. 7'
_ .
W:fi7ram the Lion King, 11. 46, 50,
Willram Foular's Close, 11. 241
Williams, the actor, 1. 348
Williamson, David, the ejected
minister 11. 133,111. 67
Williamso~, Peter, the printer, I.
122, 176, 282, 356, 11. 25, 173,
111. 250
Willow Brae The 11.314, 318
Willox, Johi, the Reformer, 11.286
Wilson, Alexander, Provost ofEdin-
339. 111. 94, 174* 327, 335, 346,
347. 361
' burgh, 1. 131, 2x8
OLD AND NEW EDINBURGH.
Wilson, Execution of Alexander, I.
129, 11. 231, 315
Wilson Charles, painter 11. 86
Wilson; Daniel, antiqdian, I. 10,
14, 21, 118, 126, 139, 142, 150,
178, 207, 213, 217, 221, 228, 230,
245, 262, 267, 268, 276,278, Nos,
317. 11. 6, 7, 9, 11, 21, 34, 58,
379, 111. 2. 32, 37, 46, 47,49, 51,
66, 72. 74. 86, 103. 113, 14 130,
131, 213, 214, 217, 221, 223, 226,
230, 232 234 a38 246 257 258
Wilson, david, th; pokcal' shamaker,
I. 230, 11. 25
Wilson; Professor George, 11. 107
Wilson, James (" Ckudero "), 11.
Wilson, Patrick, architect, Ill. 50
Wilson, Prof. John, I. 107, 339, 11.
1277 135, 140, 14Zi '42, 143, 193
223, 111. 68, 126; humother, 11. , 155, 156; anecdotes of the prcfessor,
I I. 200; his love of dogs, i6.
Wilson, Willlam Deputy-Clerk of
Session I. 46 '67 163
Wilsm, Fhhweh's;ervant inDarnley's
murder, I. 263, 111. 4, 6
Windlestrawlee farmstead, 111. 3 9
Wind Mill The 11. 346
Windmill $tree: 11. 333, 346
Windsor Street 'III. 158 159
Windy Coule, $he, 11. ;IS, 314
Wham, Colonel John, I. 62, 63,
WinLm The family of III. 338
Winter A d e n , The, 11: 214, 215
Winton, Earl of, II.34,35. 111. 57
Wishart, George, the martyr, I. w,
III.15a
Wishart George, minister of Leith
andBi;hop of Edinburgh, 11. 14,
111. 254
Wishart, Rev. William, Ill. 219,
101, 116, 135s 1% 2273 2342 2421
250, 2518 253, 2542 258, 327, 3748
250
155, 156, 194, 19s~ !w, 204 =I%
64 65
za
Wishprt of Pittarow, James, 111.
Wi:&raft, Belief in, I. 255,II. 22
111. I&. DW: Demons accused od , ,_.. ~~~ ~ 11. r~z, 223,330,111.339; witch&
burned 11. 181 Ill. 134,155,181
~odrow,' Rev. Gobert, I. 58, 60,
111, 123, 179, 196, 222, 247 287
11- 10, 17, 23, 133, 354, 111. 99:
191, 260
Women, Sumptuary laws against,
I. 198
Wood Lord 11. 174
Wood' Si Andrew, the "Scottish
Ne&n," 111. 199, 200, =I, 202,
204 206 214 267 298
Wood th;his;oriaA 111. 107 108
Wood' oseph, the &tor, 1. 3k
Wood: kr. Alexander, 11. 283,293,
303, 111.131
Woodbine Cottage, Trinity, 111.79
Woodhall 111. 2
Woodhouhe, IIf. 33
Woodhowlee, Lord, I. 156, 230,
11. I ~ , Z I O , 270, zga, 111.33
Woods theactor I. 347
Wood': Farm 11'115 117 182
Wood's Victo;! kall,'II1.'88
Wool trade, Edlnhurgh the Seat of
Wwlmet, near Dalkeith, 111. 134,
Wor ouse The 11. 325
Workhouse: Erekon of St. Cuththe,
11. 264
3 3 ~ 3 6 4 ,
bert's, 11,'135
Works at Neu
teenth century, 1 I I . z ~
World's End Close, I. 281, 282
World's End Pool, Dean village,
W
Ill A"
Wright, the acto;, I. 3i1
Wright, Thomas, 111. 47
Wrightsand masons The 11.264
Wright's-houses, Th;, II.'36, 111.
subposed denkation, 111.3; ; the
lo *32, 3+ *36, 3 9 . its
THE END.
Napiers of, 111.34; laird of, 111.
33 Wrightslands Lord I. 226 111.32~
Writer's Codt, I. :zo, 186: 229
Writers to the Signet, I. * z * ;
libraryofthe I. 123 *1z8, 1%:
186; Society'of the '1. 158 167
built on thesiteof G;orgeHbriot'G
workshop, 1. 175
Wyndham, the theatrical manager,
I. 8, 351, 11. 179, I l l . 95
W n%am, Mrs., the actress, I. 351,
111. 95
Y
Yardheads,The, Leith III.a27,z34
Y y s , Mr. and Mrs.,'I. 343, 344.
3 51
Yelverton Mrs. 111. 307
Yester, Jdmes d r d Hay of, I. 278,
11. 286
Yester, Lady, 1.278,11.286; church
of 11. 28 286 187 *n88, ago, 291,
zd9, IIL'r58 I he:sons 11. 286
York and AlbAy, Duke)of, 1. 79,
1 5 9 ~ 1 h 355, 371,1I.10~3771 111-
57
York Cardinal I. 71, 7z
York'Hotel 11: 230
York Lane '11. 188
York Plac;, 1.366 11. go, 92, 180,
182, I&, 185, 1i6, 187, 188, 190,
199, 328, 111. 158
Young, Charles tragedian, I. 348
Young Si Joh:, l!I. 4
Young: Dr., ph siclan, 91. 17, 18
Young's Land, 11. 159
Younger, the comedian, 11. 24
Yuwn, Andrew, Provost, 11. 278
z
Zoologid Gardens, The, 111.88
CASSELL & COMPANY LIMITED, BELLX SAWAGE WORKS, hNDON, kc ... 344 341, 111. 158; Foote's attack on Whitefield I. 342 Whiteford, Sir John, I.'106,~82, 11. 35 166 111. ...

Vol. 6  p. 392 (Rel. 0.17)

......

Vol. 6  p. 383 (Rel. 0.16)

......

Vol. 6  p. 382 (Rel. 0.16)

......

Vol. 6  p. 384 (Rel. 0.16)

16171,782 283, 335, 343 343
III, 140; dew of, II. 169
vanous buildings in, 11. 172; it!
early residents, 11. 166
St. Andrew Street 11. I 160, 161
St. Andrew's Stree;, LeitcIII. 226
m71228 234
St. Ann, the tailors' patron saint, I.
23
St. Rnne-s altar Holyrood 11. 58
in St. Giles'sbhurch I1.'266
St. Anne's altar, St.' Cuthbert'r
Church, 111. 94
St. Anne's Yard, 11. 76,79,3~3,3q
St. Anthony's Chapel Arthur s Seat,
I. 3 6 ; ruinsof, li. *3m *321
St. Anthony's Fire, or &ipelas,
111. 215 216
St. Anthoiy's Hermitage, I. m, 11.
303, 19, 111. 216
St. Ant%ony's Port, Leith, 111.151
SI. Anthonys preceptory, Leith,
its seal,
St. Anthonir Street, Leith, 111.
St. Anthony's Well, 11. 312, 319,
St. Anthony's Wynd,Ldth,III.z~s
St. Augustine Chapel of 11.53
St. Augustine4 Church i. zgz.zg4
St. Bennet's, Greenhill,' 111. 54
SL Bernard's Chapel, 111.75
St. Bernard's Church, 111. 75
St. Bernard's Crescent, 111. 71. p,
St. Bernard's parish, 11. 92, 135,
St. Bernard's Row, 111. 94, 97
St. Bernard's Well, III.74,75. *76,
178, 17% 2yi, ~2
111. 131, 175, 176, 215
111. '216 217 298
"178 V a
322
73, 79,81
111.77
78
58,251. !II. 49
0s LI. #5
St. Catharine's altar, Holymod, 11.
St. Cathenne of Sienna, Convenl
St. Cecilii hall, I. 151, *a5z, II.
St. Christopher's altar, St. Giles's
St. Clair Lord 1. 16g
St. Clai;of St.'Clair, General, 111.
175
Church, 11. 264, 111. a
n z
St. Clair of Roslin William, 11.
354 (sec sinclair dar~ William)
St. colme Street '11. 105
St. Columba's Ekcooal Church. I. . *
9 5 .
Church, 11. 6 3 , 264
St. Crispin's altar, St. Giles's
St. Cuthbert, Bishop of Durham,
11. 13r
295
St. Cuthben's chapel of ease, 11.
St. Cuthben's Church. Pkatc I. I.
incumbents, 11. 131;. the old
manse, 11. 132 ;demolition of the
old church, 11. 134, 136 ; erection
of the new building, 11. 134 ; the
old and new churches, 11. 131
'133, * 136, * 137 ; burials unde:
thesteeple 11. 135; theoldpoorhouse,
11.'135, 111. 83
St. Cuthbert's Free Church, 11.225
St. Cuthbert's Lane, 11. 335
St. David Street, 11. 16r, '65
St. David's Church, 11. ar6
St. Eligius, patron of the hammermen,
11.962
St. Eloi, 11. 263: carved groin
stone from Chapel of, St. Giles's
Church, I. * 147, 11. 262
St. Eloi's eo-. 11. 262
St. George's 'Church: Charlotte
St. Georie's Episco$l chapel, 11.
Square 11. 115, 126 173, 175
'90
St. Geor e's Free Church, 11. 138,
St. George's Well 111. 75
St. Giles, the pation saint of Edinburgh,
I. 138, 141, 254: seal of,
I. * 140 ; procgsiou of the saint's
relics I. 140
St. GilehChurch, 1. *I, 42,47, so,
51, 52.55, ~ 6 7 8 ~ 9 4 , IV. xm, Iax,
123, 138-147, 152, 18% 186, rga,
11. 15, 957 234, 3167 37% 111. 31,
z10,115. 75
GENERAL INDEX.
51, 173, 184; its early history
I. 138 139; the Norman door
way, i. 139, 141' the Preston
relic, I. 140; Sir DAvid Lindesaj
on the rocessionists, I. 141,
chapel ofsobert Duke of Albany:
I. 142; funeral of the Regent
Murray, I. 143; the "gude
Regent's aisle," rb. ; the Assem.
blyaisle, I. 144; disputes between
am- VI. and the Church party, I. 144,146'departureofJamesVI.
I. 146 ; Haddo's hole, ib. ; thi
Napier tomb, id. ; the spire and
lantern, I. '144, 146; theclock
and bells, I. 146 ; the Krames, I.
147 ; restorations of 1878 ib. ;
the or an, ib. ; plan of St. kiles's
Churcf I. *1452 the High
Church' 1. *I 8 149; removal
of hone;: from f f. 384
3t. Giles's Chdchyard, I. 148, 149,
157 11. 379
31. Ghes's Grange, 111. 47, 49, 52,
54 ;, its vicar, 111. 49
3t. Giles's Kirkyard, 11. 239
3t. GilesStreethow PrincaStreet).
I. 286 11. 11;
3t. Gd&s Street, Leith, 111. 223,
226 234
3t. Jimes's chapel, Newhaven, 111.
216, 295, 298, p; remains of,
3t. James'schapel,Leith, III.*240,
111. 297
243
3t. ams'sOpw=opalchapel 11.184
jt.jame~'sEp~opalChurcd,Leith,
111. *241, 243
3t. James's Square, I. 366. 11. 176, . _ _ . .~
19.
3t, lohn the Baotist's Chaoel. 111. . . si, 53
St. John's altar, St. Giles's Church,
II.26?,65
3t.John sCatholicChapel, Brighton
St. Johks chapel, Burghmuir, 111.
Place 111. 147
126, 134, d, 338, 383
3t. John's Established Church, I.
291
Leith 111. *n44
jt. John's Established Church,
jt. Johr;'s Free Church I. z 5, 314
Zt. John's Free Church,'Leiti, 111.
j t T p Hill I. 82
It. ohn's Stdet, 1. 325, 11. 2, 9,
jt. Katherine of Scienna, Convent
2, 53, 329 ; ruins of,
jt. Kathanne's altar, Kmk-of-Field,
jt. Katharine's altar, St. Margaret's
It. Katherine's chapel, Currie, 111.
jt. Katherine's estate, 111. 330
it. Katharine's Place, 111. 54
it. Katharine's Thorn, 11. 363,
it. Katherine's Well, Liberton, 111.
25, 26 27, 31, 111. 63
of 111. 51
IiI. *S4 ; 12 history, ib. ; seal of,
111. *55.
111. I
chapel, Libaton, 111. 53
332
111.54
328, 3291 330
chapel of I 383, 384
it. Leonard, Suburb of, I. 382;
it. Leonard's 'craigs, I. 75, III. 27,
142
it. Leonard's Hill, I. 55, 384, 11.
34 ; combat near, I. 383
it. Leonard's, Leith, 111. 227
it. Leonard's Kirkyard, 11.379
it. Leonards Loan, I. 383
it. Leonard's Well, 111. 89
it. Leonard's Wynd, 11. 54
it. Luke's Free Church, II.r53,.r55
it. Magdalene's Chapel, I. 240
it. Margaret, I. 16, 18, I
it. Margaxet's Chapel, adinburgh
Castle, I. 19, *zo, 76; chancel
arch of I. *24
it. Margset'sconvent, III.45,'48
it. Margaret's Loch, 11. 319
it. Margaret's Tower, Edinburgh
it. Margaret's Well, Edinburgh
Cade. I. 36, 48, 78
Castle, I. 49
St. Margaret's Well, Restalrig, 11.
St. LIC~ chapel &nLtarian), II.
11, 313, 111. I2 131
214
St. Mark's Episcopal chapel, Port*
bello 111. 147 *153
St. M L j Magdhene chapel, New
Hailes 111. 149, 366
St. M& Magdalene's Chapel, 11.
258, 261, 26a *a64' mterior 11.
264 : tabled on the walls,' 11.
262 *268
St. MkMagdalene's Hospital, 11.
26r, 262
St. Mary's Cathedral 11. 116, 211;
exterior and interior, 11. *ZIZ,
'213
St. Mary'sChapel, Niddry's Wynd,
St. M&s Ckpel, broughton
Street, I. z6z
St. Mary's Church, South Leith,
111. 130, 135, 182, 196, *217,218,
* z ~ o 222 244 ; its early hatory,
I. 247 251, 298 11. 26
III.;I8 :19
St. Mary'; Convent I. 107,382
St. Mary's Free Ch$ch 11. 184
St. Mary's Hos ita1 I. :97
St. Mary's-in-t\e-$ield 11. '34
251, 252, III. 1 7 ; its history:
111. I, a
St. Mary's parish church, 11. 191 ;
school-house, 111. 87
St. Mary's Port, 1. 382
St. Mary's Roman Catholic chapel,
St. Maryi Street' I. p 11. 238
St. Mary'sWynd,' 1.38, A, 217,219,
274. 275 * 29.298,2 I 335,375
382, 11. ;3, 249.~84~1%. 6 ; door!
head in 1. *3m
St Matth:w'sWell, Roslio,III. 3 I
St. Michael's Church, Inveres?c,
St. Nicholas Church North Leith,
111. 168, 176, 187 :its demolition
by Monk, 111. 187 255
St. Nicholas Wyud, fII. 256
St. Ninian's altar, St. Giles's
Church, 111. 119
St. Ninian's Chapel, I. 364, 111.72
St. Ninian's Church, North Leith,
11. 47, 111. 167 *I# 251 aga;
pe,tv tyrann in, iii. 25;; its
ministers IIE 254, 2 5 5 ; now a
g r a n a r y , ' ~ ~ ~ . 254,255
St. Niuian's Churchyard 111. *256
Sc. Ninian's Free Churih, North
Leith, 111.255
Si. Ninian's Row, I. 366,II. 103,176
St. Patrick Square, 11. 339
St. Patrick Street, I. 366, 11. 346
St. Patricks Romao Catholic
Church, 1. 278, 11. 249
St.Paul's Chapel,CarmbWsClo,
I. 239 *a40
St. Pads Episcopal Chapel, I. 278
St. Paul's Episcopal Church, York
Place, 11.60,188,198,248
St. Paul's Wark, 11. 101
St. Peter'sChurch,RoxburghPlace,
11. '79' school 11. 326
111.149
11. 338
St. Peter's Close 11. 255
St. Peter'sEpiscdpal Church,II1.51
St. Peter's Pend, 11. 255
St. Roque, 111.47 ; legends of, 111.
46,47
St. Roque's Chapel, Rurghmuir,
111.47, ?g : ruins of, Ill. *48
St. Roque s Day 111. 47
St. Roque's KirI&rd, 11. 379
St. Salvator's altar, St. Giles's
St. Staphhs Church, 111. * 81,83,
St. Thomas's Epkopal Chapel, 11.
Church 111. 35
85
. . - .
St?homas's Church, Leith, 111.
St. Tkdudna, 111. r p ; Church of,
St. Vincen't strhet, III. 83
Stafford Street, 11. 211
Stage, The, in Edinburgh, I.
247 248 '253
III.rz8 130 '3'
352
Stagesoaches, Establiihment of,
11.15, 16,235,236; the Glasgow,
11.121
Stained-glass window P a r l i i e n t
House 1. 159 Plati6
stainh0u;e. La;d of, I. 1:9*
389
Stair, Earlof, I. p, 94,37 , 11. 38,
95, 167, 327, 348, 358, h. 3%
367
E.W~ Stair, I. 103,
Stair, Eliiheth Countess of 1. xrn
-106 17r, 111. 41 ; the "Iavic
mirrd "1.103; hermarriagewrth
Stamp duty, In0uence of the, on
newspapers, I. 284,285
Stamp Office, I. 234,267
Stamp Office Close, I. *ng, 231,
232 ; execution there, 1.2%
Standard Life Assurance Company,
11. '3
Stantied tragedy The I. 281
ztanley, Star and the Garter" acto:, 1. tavern ;30 I. 187
Steam communication iivd~eith to
Stedman Dr. John 11.301
Steele, sir Richard,,l: 106
Steil Pate, the musicin, I. 251
Stenkor Stenhouse, 111.339
Steveu Rev. Dr,, the historm of
the high School, 11.11 287, a88,
289, 291:296,35Sr 3&?11- 135
Stevenlaws Close 11.242
Stevenson, Dr. Ahibald, 11. 144
147
Stevenson, Duncan, and the Beacm
newspaper, I. 181, 182 11.241
Stevenson Dr. John I d 18 19~27
Stewart &hibald 'Lord Phvost,
I. 318, 322, 32;) 11. 280, 283;
house of I. 318 * 325
Stewart ojAllanbLk, Sir John, 11.
26
Stewart Sir Alexander, I. 195
Stewart' of Colmess, Sir J ~ C S ,
Provost, 11. 281,111. 340
Stewart, Sir ames, I. 1r7
stewart of &trees Sir Jmi-
I. 229, 111. 34-3;~ ; his h o d
in Advocate's Close, I. *223, Ill.
30' Sir Thomas ib.
Stewah Sir Lewis '111. 364
Stewariof Monk&, Sir Williim,
Murder of I. 196,258, 259, 74
Stewart of 'Grantully, Sir john,
Stewart of Grantully, Sir George,
11. 350; his marriage, 111.90
Stewart, Dugald, I. 106, 156, 11.
17, 39, 120, 168, 195, m~r 2 3,
111.20,55; gray of II. 29 ; his
father, 111.20 ; h e cife, 11. 206 :
her brother, 11. 207; Dugalds
monument 11. III
Stewart Jades 111.79
Stewart'of Gariies, Alexander, 11.
225
Stewart Belshes of Invermay, Sir
John, 11. 383.
Stewart, Daniel, 111. 67; hospital
of, id.; ne* from Drumsheugh
London, 111. 2x1
11. 97 117, 128,13 , 151,175, ZIO
Steel, si; John,scuiptor, I. 159,372.
11. 351
grounds, 111. *68
road, 'I. 3%
3 d
111.221
Stewart Robert, Abbot of Holy-
Stewart of Castle Stewart 11. 157
Stewart ofGarth, Genera;, 11. 150,
Stewart of Strathdon, Sir Robert,
Stewart Colonel ohn, 11. 350
stewart' hptain Eeorge, 11.257
Stewart: Lieut.Colone1 Matthew,
Stewart, Captain James, I. 195, I@
Stewart of W t r e e s , I. 6a
Stewart, Execution of Alexander,
Stewart Lady Margaret 111. n I
Stewart'of lsle Mn., 11.' 162
Stewart, Nichblson, the actor, I.
Stewartfield manor-how, 111. 88,
Stewart s Hospital, 11. 63, 111.67
Stewarth oysteehouse, i. I m
Stirling, Enrls "f T I ? E
Stirliig
stirling gi ~ e w a I. 44 42 11.223
stirliig: sir w&, Lord Rovost,
Stirling of Kek, Sir William, 11.
158 ; h e daughter, 111.35
Stirling, General Graham, I I. 153
Stirling, Mrs., actRsq I. 35f
11. d
a youth, 11. 231
343
91, * 93
11. ~ $ 2 283, 391
I. 374 ... 283, 335, 343 343 III, 140; dew of, II. 169 vanous buildings in, 11. 172; it! early residents, 11. ...

Vol. 6  p. 389 (Rel. 0.11)

GENERAL INDEX. 387
Rhind. David. architect. 11. 147
275, '2 6, I I t . 67 244 .
Rhmd, {anet, ToAb of, 11. 262
Riccarton, 111. 319; its loca
history, 111. 321
Riccarton House 111. 322
Richard 11. of E h a n d . 11. 2
Richardson, Messrs., tobacconists
Richardson, W.L.,theartist, 111.8:
Richmond Court 11. 338
Richmond Stree; 11. 188 333, 332
Riding School ?he 11. 1>8
Riding School'Lani, 11. 135
Riddell's Close, I. 110, 1rr,z82, ng:
Riddell's Land, I. 98, 110, 11. 9
Riddle Sir Jama 11. 187 194
Riddle's Close, Liith, 111: 226, 22(
Ri ht of sanctuary, Edinburgt
tastle deorived of the. I. 67
111. 34
, ,
Rillbank IiI. 55
Riots at ;he Cananmills, 111. 87
Risps, or ancient knockers, I. 94
237, 271, 11. 253
35'
Ristori, Madam, the actress, I
Ritchie, the sculptor, 11. 134, 147
336
Ritchie, hitch, 111. 79
Ritchie, Prof. Uavid 11. rg6
Ritchie. William. iditor of thq
Scoto;mm, I. 284
of the Scottish bank note: RE25 and 5s.. 11. 94
Rirzio, David, Murder of, I. 6, 50
92. 3173 11. 41, 58, 66,68, 70, 71
92; abude of. 11. 11,111. 361
Rivio Joseph 11. 68, 70,
Robe4 Abbot)of H~lyrood,~II. 3
Rober;[., 11. 307, 111. 35, 94, 166
Robert II., I. 26, 27. 142, 11. 3
Robeh III., I. 27, 11. 54,111. 317
Robert Bruce, I. 23,24,III. 199,34:
Robert Gourlays house, 1. 116
327,343, 348
323 338, 348.354. 362
331, 354, 355
278, 111. 32, 59, 118, 166, 315
*rao 123 &. David. the oainter. 11. 80 Robei
III. +, 83; his p;rents,lI~. 7;
78; his birthplace, 111. -77, 78
Robertson, Patrick, Lord, 11. 156
175, 191, 193, 19% zoo, 111. 126
240; Lockhart's description 0:
him, 11. I 3 ; Lockhart'sepitaph:
an him, I?. 194
Robertson, Dr., I. 101, 231, 236
271, 273, 11. 27, 194: tomb of
11. * 381. (See also the two fol
Iaving articles)
Robertson, Principal, 1. 106, 261
(See tkc $re.
11. 255, 281, 24% 293. 378, 379
111. 20, 22, 23,45.
ceding andfolrauing artider)
Robertson, the historian, 11. 168
his death, 111. 49; his materna
niece, Lord Brougham's mother
11. 168. (See the two precedizg
Robertson Memorial Estahlishec
Chutch, 111. 50
Robertson, Dr., the Leith historian
111. 167, 173, 218, 219, zzo, 222
226, zA, 229, 23r. 235, 236, 238.
239,245, 2471 249, 256, 259:
2697 2701 276
Robertson Mr I. 175
Robertsonlof zochart, George, I.
204 206
Robekson of Lude, Lieut.-General.
111. 34 ; his black Servant, ib.
Robertson, Geordie, 11. 3'6
Kcbertson, John, and the lepers,
11. I02
Robertson Mrs. Hannah reputed
grand-diughter of Chahes II.,
Robertson's Close, 11. 250, 251
Robertson's Land, I. 178
"Robin Hood,"Gameof, forbidden,
I . 116, 277 ; riot in wnsequence,
II.21,355
1. 126
"Robin Mend-the-Market," 111.
274
RobRoy, 111,9r; thesonsof,I.70;
popularity of the play of, I. 349,
350
Rob Roy's purse, 11. 87
Rohinson, Professor, 11. 86, 191
Rohinson's Land, I. 264
FWwn, the actor, I. 351
Rocheid of Inverleith, Sir James, I
Rocheid family The 111. 94
Rocheid of 1n;erleith James, 111.
95 ; his encounter d t h the Duke
of hlontaw, ib. ; his mother, ib.
111.94, 343
architect. 11. 184
5, 6
Rollinson, the comedian, I. 350
Rollo, Lord, I. 208
Rollock, Hercules, 11. 288, 289
Rullock of Pilton Peter 111. 307
Rollock Robert,' PrinApal of the
Univirsity, I1 -78,111.8,9,16,2
Roman CatholicJchapels attacked
by the mob, 11. 282
Roman Eagle Hall I. IrI
Romanism, BurleAue on 11. 289
Roman relics and coins i. 10
Roman road near Portdbello. I. 10. . . * I2
I. +I0
319
Roman urn foundnear DeanBridge,
Romieu, Paul, the clockmaker, I.
Rood Chapel, Broughton, 111. 151
Rose, Bishop Alexander, 11. 22,
Rosebery, Archibald Earl of, I.
Rosebery Earls of I. g 111. 106
Rosebery: Lord, IiI. :5, 3 5
Rosebery James Ear? of, ?I. 324:
singula; advertisement, ib.
Rosehaugh, the persecutor, 11. 331,
375
Rosehaughs Close I. 253 25
Rose Court, Georie Stree;, If. 1x8
Rosehill, DavidLord, 111. 30
ROM Street, 11. 146, 158, 159, 163,
Rose Street Lane, 11. 150
Rosebank Cemetery, 111. 89
Roseburn Howe 111. I-, 103,
*104; lintel at: III. *Io3; 111-
scriptions at, ib.
Roseburn Mqltings, 111. 102
Rosevale Place 111. 266
Roslin Castle, iII. 346, 3 , *348,
351 ; its early history, 141. 347-
s p ; the St. Clairs (Sinclairs),
111. 131
2572 11. 1042 109
96
say, D a d ) ' ;, Lords, I. 66, 11.326, 339,111.
362
Ross of Hawkhead, Lord, 111.260
Ross, John Earl of I. 247
ROSS David comedian, I. 341, 342
Koss: Walte:, the antiquary, I. 230,
Ross House 11. 338, 339
Ross Park iI. 338, 339
Rosslyn. Earls of, I. 271-273, 111.
33% 111. 71-73
349-
Rosr's Court I. 91
Ross's Towe:. or " Follv."
Rothes, Earls of, I. 159, 11. p, 218,
Rothesay, Duke of, 1. 26, 27. 142,
Rothesay, Earl of, 11. 65
Rothesay Place, 111. 62
Kothiemay, Lady, 1. 281
Rotten Row, Leith, 111. 167. 235
Kotunda The 11. 83
Roubilkk, the'sculptor I. 159
Routing Well, The, 11). 364
Row, Colonel Archibald, I. zoz ; his
wife s tomb, 1. 203
Row, the Church hiatorian, 111.260
Rowites The I. 239
Rowland Hili, the preacher, 11. 103
Roxburgh, Dukes of,I. 128,223,Il.
' 5 , '23
Roxburgh, Earls of, I. 223, 11. 3,
15,50,181,111.57; houseof 11.34
Roxburgh, Dr., botanist, IIi. 162
258
11. 47, 243. 111. 31, 32
Roxburgh Close I. 223
Roxburgh Club,'I. 375
Roxburgh parish 11. 135
Roxburgh Place 'I. 362 111 338
Roxburgh Terrice, 11. j38
Royal apartments in Holpood
Xowl dank. I. 217. 222, 24% 11.
Palace Piate 15
Fro 115, 136 170"171 *17a'
the, 1. 182
335337 *?40
*IQ) its curator 111. 98
111. 71
b y a i Bank Ciose, iI1. h 4 ; fire in
hsyal Blindksylum andschool, 11.
Royal Bo;anic Gardens, 111. gb,
Royal kircus, 11. '195, 199, *ZOI,
Royal Collegeof Physicians, I. 362,
11. 247
Royal Company of Archers 11.348
3, 354; their hall, Ii. * 3 y :
Royal Crescent 111. a6
Royal Edinbuigh Asylum, 111.
25,53
39
Royal Edinburgh Volunteers, I. 63,
Royal Exchange, The, I. 79, 183-
187, *r8 191, 228, 229, a42, 255,
11. 281 ?I]. 125 ;.plan of the, I.
* t 8 8 ; ;he Council Chamber, I.
11. 307. *377, 111. 105, 264
184, 186, Pkfc 7; back of the
Royal Exchange, Plafe 10
Royal family, Submission by the
Jacobites to the, 11. 247
Royal gardens, Holyrood Palace,
11. "65 *69, 9
Royal H~ghlanJ Society, 111. 127
Royal Horse Bazaar 11.225
Royal Hotel, 11. I&; its distinguhhed
guests, ib.
Royal Infirmary, 11. 146, 147, 28r,
282,296, 298-302, 359, 111. 114;
thenewbuilding 11.358,359,*361
Royal Institution,'The, 11. 83, 86,
88. 01. 0 2 : in 1810. 11. *84: at ..
present -11. "85 ='
Royal Lhth Volunteers, The, 111.
198, 264
burgh Castle, I. 32, 36, *68
Royal Life Guards 11. 217
Royal lodging, 0; palace, Edin-
Roval Maternitv Hosnital. 11.2'1
Royal Maternity and $impson hie-
Royal Medical S&iety, I. 123, 11.
morial Hospital 11. 362
yx.303, 111. 266, 311
Royal Riding School, 11. 334, 335
Royal Scots Grey Dragoons I. 64
Rqyal Scottish Academy, 11:86,88,
Royal Scottlsh Naval and Military
Royal Scotkh Volunteer review,
Royal Society, l h e , 11. 83, 86, 204,
89, 9x7 921, I97
Academy 11. 335
11. 320, 354. Plate 23
111. 77
~Oy.2 Terrace 11.103
Royal Terrace'Gardens, 111. 158
Royal tournaments, I. 35
Royston, Lord I. rrr,273,III.310,
311 ; eccenhc pranks of his
daughter, I. 111,135,III.11q, 312
Royston, III.308,310
Koyston Ca5tle, 111. 311
Ruddiman, Thorn=, grammarian,
I. 110, 123, 11. 291, 382, 111. 363
Ruddiman, theprinter, 11.310,III.
Ruglen, Earl of, 111. 122, 3'7
Ruins of the old Market Closeafter
Rule, Principal Gilbert, 111. 14, 16
Rullion Green, 111. p. 334. *337
Rumhold, Richard, 1. 59, 60
Runciman. the oainter. I. oz. axo.
363
the fire, I. *177.
Russell Bishop of Leith 111. 187
Russell: Rev. 'Dr. h d a e l , 111.
Russell the actor I. 350
Rutheriord, Lord: 11. 98, 174, 111.
RutAerford Sir John 11. 356
Rutherford: Alison, iI. 156
Rutherford, Andrew, 11. 156
Rutherford, Dr., the fint inventor
243
68 ITI
of gas, I. 274, 276, 11. 383; hu
nephew, Sir Walter Scott, I. 276
Rutherford the botanist 11. 1zo
Rutherford: Anne(Si WAterScott's
mother) 11. 142
Rutherfurd-Clark, Lord, 111.26
Ruthven David Lord I. 178
Ruthven: Williarn Loh I. 6 206
215, 316, 11. 66, 70, 71; II1.'174!
his dagger I. 317
Ruthven Si; Patrick, I. 52, 54, 95
Ruthven' the printer 11.18 111.271
Ruthven's Land L i d I. 5x6
Rutland Street, \I. I$, zog
Ryan, the actor, 11.23
S
Sabbath, Breaches of the, 11. 132,
Sadler Sir Ralph, 111. 154 20)
Sailin;, Early restrictions on, III.
I33
'59
ailors' Home, Leith, 111. a59
'Salamander Land," The, 1. 142
Salamander Street, Leith, 111. 239
Salisbury, Earl of I1 305
Salisbury Craigs, \. I&, 384,II. 60,
161, 303, 305, 34, 3'372 311. 111,
142
Salisbury Road 111. 55
Salmon, Charle;, the local poet, 11.
310
111. 164
Salmon Pool, The, Water of Leith,
Salt Backet The, 11. 178
Saltoun, h i d , 11. 343, 344
Fmpson's Grave,!I. 319
Sarnsou's Ribs, I. 11. 11. 312,
313
Sancto Claro, W i l l i de, 111. 35
Sanctuary Court-house, 11. 11
Sand Port Leith 111.171, 177,281
Sand PoriStreet' Leith 111. 259
Sandford Bishod 11. 1:6 111. 147
Sandford: Sir Dakel K. iI. 126
Sand-glasses, Use of, in law courts,
Sandiland, James, 111. 42
Sandilands, Sir James, I. 195, 245,
302 11. 47 65 111. 116
Sandhand's ho;e I 240
Saughton Bridge'IiI. 319, *3zo
Saughton Hall, iII. 19
Saughton House, I d . 3 9 , * 320; a
drunken brawl I11 19
Saughton Laan knd,'dl. 319
Saunders Street, 111. 76
Saxe-Coburg Place 111. 75
Schmitz, Dr.Leonhh, 11.111,III.
School House Wynd, 111.2
School Lane, 111. 28
Sciennes Court, 111. 54
Sciennes Hall 111. 51
Sciennes Hill house 111. 55
Sciennes b a n III. \4
Sciennes, The,' 111. 29, 50, 51, $2,
I. I72
81
Scott William Lord Stowell, I. 299
Scott: LordJdhn, 111. 322
Scott, Sir Gilbert, the architect, 11.
111, 213, 111. 243
Scott, Sir John, 1. 210
Scott, Sir Walter, I. 3, 7, 12, 7'. 75,
1077 '23,1% 1% 150, 1549 163.
166, 171,173, 179, 182, 211, 222, ... INDEX. 387 Rhind. David. architect. 11. 147 275, '2 6, I I t . 67 244 . Rhmd, {anet, ToAb of, 11. ...

Vol. 6  p. 387 (Rel. 0.11)

' GENERAL INDEX.
Tytlm of Woodhouselee, William,
Tytler, the aeronaut, 111. 135
I. 155
U
Umbrella First use of the, 11. 282
Umptmvhe's cross I. 383
Union BankofScotlind 11.150,151
Unlon Bank Leith I d . 239
Union Canal, The,'I$. 99, 2x5, 219,
Union cellar, The, I. 164, * 165
Union Club, The, 111. 122
Union of Scotland and England,
Unpopularity of the I. 163-165,
178. 11. 37, 111. 19;; its dire effects
and ultimate good results,
I. 165 ; increase in wealth in spite
of the, I. 155' e&ct of 11. 15 ;
place where i; wns siined, 11.
'32, 33 : period when Edinburgh
seemed toarouse fromitslethargy,
11.175 ; rights of the University
defined, 111. 16
Union Jack first usedin Leith, 111.
182
UnitedCorporationofLeith,I17.218
United Incorporation of St. Mary's
226, Ill. 326
Chapel, The, 11.264
United Presbyterian Church, 11.
, 138, 185, 214
United Presbyterian Church of
Scotland, Offices of the, 11.152
United Presbyterian Theological
Hall, 11. zy.
United Secewon Chapel of the
Links Leith, 111. 265
United Secession Congregation, 11.
University buildin s 11. 356
University Club #de 11. 125
University Hall: 11. ;56
University library, The, 11. 356,
Ut%r%;B%alSchools, Lauriston,
11. 357
University ofedinburgh, I. ~ 5 5 , 11.
274, 282, 298 111. 8 - 2 7 ; its origin,
111.8: the first Regent3,III.
9; James VI.'svisitation, I l l . 10;
salanes of the professors, ib.:
magisterial visitation, 111.10, 11,
15;abolitionof thebirch 111.11;
Cromwelrsgifts, ib.; and-Popery
riots,III. 11-13; the quadrangle,
111. 25 : south side of, 111% * 13 ;
professors expelled, 111. 14 ; dw
section first practised, I I I . r 4 , 1 ~ ~
quarrel with the Town Council:
111. 15 ; the museum of rarities,
ib. ; a Greek professor appointed,
111. 16; s stem of educationpursued
by h-tcipal Rollock, ib. ;
early mode of education, I11.18:
achangein17p.111. 19; theold
hours of attendance, ib. ; the silver
mace, 111.~2. projects for a new
college ib . 0;iginaldesignforthe
new bdldlAg, 111. '20; original
plan of its principal storey, 111.
* 21 ; the foundation-stone laid,
11. 17~22; completionofthenew
college, 111. 2 . its corporation
after 1858, II?.' 24 : principals,
chaiis, and first holden thereof,
111. 24, 15: average number of
students, 111 2 5 . notable bequests
111. '26. 'income ib.;
1 1 4 , ib. ; the 1;brary hail, 111.
*z8; the museums, Ill. 27; the
new building Pink z~
215, 2 3 249
University prilting-office, 1. 116
Upper Baxter's Close, I. 106
Upper Bow Port, I. 217, zrg ; relics
Upper dean Terrace, 111. 75
Upper Quarry Holes 111. 128 158
Upper West BOW, ~ . ' q i , II.
Urbani, Signor Pietro 11. 178
Urquhart, Sir George,' I. 226
Urt, Jacob de, theartist, 11. 74
of, I. I0
V
Valleyfield House 111. p
Valleyfield Street,'III. 30
Vandenhoff the tragedian I. 350
Veitch, Wiham, the Gdenanting
Veitches,Clan rivalries of the, I. 1%
Veitch's Square, 111. 75
Vennel, The, I. 38, 258, 11. 221,
122 225, 226, 239, 362, 111. 30;
vie; of ~ t a t e 21
Vennel, $he, Newhaven 111. agg
Veteran A naval II. 22;
VictorilDock, L;ith, 111.284, *285
Victoria Jetty, Leith, Ill. 284, 312
Victoria Statueof Queen 11. 83
Victoria'street, I. 291, *'293. 310,
Victoiw. swing bridge, Leith, 111.
Victoria Terrace, I. 111, 291, agz,
Viewforth Free Church, 111. 30
Vinegar Close, Leith, 111. 226;
sculptured stone in, 111. *2z6
Virgin's Square, 111. 75
Vocat, David, 11. 287, 111. 2
Voght theGerman traveller, 11.120
Volunieer Light Dragoons, Ertab
lishment of 11. 342
Volunteer review in the Queen's
Park 11. 310-32z, 354, Phi< 23
Vyse, beneral, 1 ~ 3 7 2 , 3 7 3
minister, 11. 273
319 ,II. 230
"73.&6
*293r 310
W
Wade General 11. 354
Wagekg Clud The 11. 319
Wait the paintk 11; go
Walcer of Coatei. Sir Patrick. 11.
111, 116, 111. 2.j
Walker Bishop 11. 198
Walker)of Drukheugh, M k , 11.
138
Walker, Dr 1. 235
Walker, JGes, Clerk of Session,
Walker, Patrick, 111. 156
Walker Street 11. 210, arr
Walkers of CAtes, Misses, 11. 210
Walkers The 11. 265
Wall of 'lam& 11.. Excavation of
11. 217
the I I - z ~ .
Wallice k i r h l i a m , I. 24, III. 143
Wallace of Craigie, Si Thomas,
I. IOI
378
Wallace of Elderslie, ohn, 11. 344
Wallace, Dr. Kobert,l. go, 11. 180,
Wallace, Prof. William, 11. 13
I r Wallace's Cradle," 1. *z5
Wallace's Tower, 1. 36, 4g
Wallace's cave and camp, 111. 355,
Walter Comvn. I. 21
366
Wnller de H*unkrcokbe I 24
Walter, Earl of Monteitb. i. 13
Ward, hlrs., the actress, 11. 23, 24
Wardie, 111. 84,94, ~4 307
Wardie Bum 111.
Wardie Castl; I. 4 2 1 1 . 310
Wardie Crexe'nt, IIi. 307
Wardie Muir, 111. 98, 306
Wardie Point, Ill. 286
Wardieburn House 111. 307
Wardlaw Sir John: 111. 161
Wardlaw' Sir William 11. 23
Wardlaw: Portrait of br., 11. 92
Ward's Inn, 111. 140
Warlaw Hill 111. 331
Warren, SaAuel, the author, 11.
Warrender Sir George 111. 46,47
Warrende; Sir John, Lbrd Provost,
Warrender, Sir Patrick, 111. 46
Warrender of Lochend, Bailie Lord
Warrenddr Capt. John IIJ. 46
WarrenderlHouse 111.'45 +48
Warrender Lodgi, Meaddw Place,
Warrend& Park, Old tonib in, 111.
Warrender Park Crescent, 111. 46
Warrender Park Road, 111. 46
Warrenders of Lochend, The family,
111. 45
Warriston, Lord, I. 226, 111. 9;
Bishop Burnet's account of him,
111.99; hisson,III. IOI
loo
111. 46
Provost 111. 46
11. 348 111.29
46
Warriston, Abduction of Lady, 111.
WarASton, 111. 96, 306, 321; iu
Warriston cemetery, I. 155,111.57,
WarristoA'n Close I. 223 224 11.
1x5; Messrs. Cdmbers':printkig
office, I. zq, 226; Sir Thomas
Caig's house, I. 226
Warriston Crescent, 111.95, IO~,
Warriston House, 111. *97,98,101,
98. execution of 111. 9
hitsory, 111. 98
111. 83 10,) 307
125
Gallery, 11. 89
Warriston's Land 111. gg
Water-colour coliection, National
Water Gate, The, I. 43, 59. 11. z.
114, 182, 185, 191, 202. zog, 217,
751 77, 83,86, 87,907 91,1018 102,
103, 118, 132, 164, 165, 178, 251,
of, 111. 42 63 65 67 70 * 7 z .
valley of, f11. bz& its'flocds:
Water Port, The, Leith, 111. ~ g r
Water supply of the city, 1. 82, 326
Water Reservoir, The, Leith, 111.
Waterloo Bridge, 11. r g
Waterloo Place, I. 234, 339,II. 91,
Waterloo Rooms 1. 286
Water's Close, d i t h , 111. 234; old
house in 111. 189
Watson Gptain R.N. 11.91.
Watson: George,' the phinter, 11.
88, go, 91, 151, 19; his brother
Andrew, 111. 161
Watson George 11. 358, 359 (see
Watdn's Hoaiital)
Watson-Gordon, Sir John, 11. 88, rv 9% 1277 143, 15k, 111. 4
w rother's beouest to the dnii
238, 111. 63, 64,68, 71. ' 73, 74,
252, 270, 322, 333. 360; village
111. 71
213
'04, 1073 109
versity, 111. 26
of, 111. 26
p i t a l , d
Watson, Henry George, Bequest
Watson ohn 111. 68; his hos-
Watson of Muirhouse. Marmet. I. I - ,
366
papers, 111. 215
Watson, Robert, and the Stuart
Wawn, W i l l i i S.. the artist, 11.
9' '5'
Wa&n famil The 11. 91
Watson's Col?& Sihool for Boys,
Watson's (George) Hospital, 11.
11. 359,363
:533 347,355,358, 359, *360, 111.
-J- Watson's (John) Hospital, 111. 68;
view from Drumsheugh grounds,
111. "68
Watson's Merchant Academy, 11.
359
Watt, John, Deacon ofthe Trades,
Watt Institution and SchoolofArts,
Watt, Provost, 111. 286
Watt, StatueofJames, 1.380 1 1 . ~ 5
Watt, Kobert, Trial and exkcutiou
of for treason 11 236-238
Waks Hospirai L k h 111. 265;
its founder Ili. 365, :66
Wauchope, d r John h n , 111. 338
Wauchopes of Niddrie, 'lhe, 111.
3=71 30,339
Waverfey Bridge 11. rm
6' Waverley NOV&: I. 211,339.11.
341 ; their popularity on the
stage, 1. 354 351 ; their author
unknown 11. 26. Sir W. Scott
avows deir autdorship, I. 354
Waverley Station 111. 87
Wealth oftheSco;tishChurch,I. 24z
Webb Mrs theactress 1.347
Webs&, d. Alexande; I. go
Webster, the murderer, iI. 183
Webster's Close, I. go
Websten The 11. 2%
Weddal kapdin I. 52, 54
Wedde;burn, Laid Chancellor, 11.
111.29
1- "377, 3792 380, 11. 275
11. 150
287,293
39r
Wedderbum Alexander, Lord
Wedderburn, Patnck, Lord Ches-
Wedderdurn Sir David, I. 358
Wedderbum' Sir Peter I. 172
Wedderburn' David Ii. zgr
Weigh Ho&, Edirhrgh, The, I.
Loughbordugh, I. 271
terhall I. 271
55 5, 328, 334 331. *332 ; the.
L i t 1 111. 238
Weir dobert, themurderer, 111.99.
Weir) of Kirkton, the wizard, 1.3,
31-312, 11. 14, 230 (sec Major
'I'homas Weir)
Weir's Museum, 11. 12s
Well-home Tower, I. 20, 3q36,II.
1x5; ruins of, 1. + z9,.80
Wellington Placz, Leith, 111. 178,.
186
Wellington statue, Register House.
Wellington Street, 11. 218
Wells of Wearie, 11. 322
Welsh, Rev. Dr 11.98 145, 210
Welsh Fusiliers: Scots' dislike of,.
1. 12% 130
Wemyss, Earl of, 11. 27, 157, 170,
194 354 111.365, 366 ; Countess
Wemyss of Elcho Lard 111.94
~ e m v s s . Sir lam&. I.
I. 37% 373
of, t. Id
Wemiss; Sir john 1. 194
Wemyss, L i r d of'II. 65
Wemyss, the arcdtect, 111.88
Wemyss Place 11.115
Wesley John 'at Leith 111.227
Wesleyh Me;hodistCl$pel, 11.335
West, the comedian, 1.342
West Bow, The, I. 3, 4, 37, 3:' 94,
98, 131, m-321, 11. 230, 9 3 .
2371 35)r 375, 111. 34, 19; OlCf.
houses III, 1. * 324
Wesr Bush, The, aunken rock, 111.
307
West Church, I. 334 11. 82, I o-
138, 3+6, 111. %, 73; new o{II.
* 136
West Churchyard, 11.116, 111.156,
West Coates Establihed Church,
West College Street, 11. 274
West Craigmillar Asylum for Blinb.
WCst Cumberland Street, 11. 18%
Wet End Theatre, The, 11. 214
West Highland Fencibles, Mutiny-
West Kirk Act, 'lhe, 11. 133
Wat Kirk parish The 11.346
West Leith villaie, I d . 63
West Loan 111. 51
WestLondAnStreet 11.1 I 1 1 1 . 1 6 ~
West Maitland &et 19. &J
West Meadow, 11. 36:
West Nicolson S t e t , 11. 337
West Port, The, I. 38,42,47, so, 60.. 9 76, ~ v r 1 2 2 , ~ 3 0 , 146,330,334~
1 . 134, 135, 221--230, 241,.
259, 330,111.42, g $ ~ u , 135; old!
houses in the, 11. 224
West Port Street, 11. 226
West Preston Street 111. .p
West Princes S t r d Gardens, 11-
Wes; Regkter'street, I. 114 171,.
West'Kichmond Street, I. 384, 11.
11.214
Females, 111. 51
of the 111. 194, 195
82 *IOI 128 130
372 111. 78
WZer The district 11.221
WesteiCoates, Markon of, 11.116
Western Bank, The, 11. a67
Wetern Duddingston, 11. 316;
house where Prince Charles slept,
Westem hew TO^, The, 11. q-
221 111. ,--Irz
Wedrn or Queen's Dock, 111. 283
Western Reformatory 11.~18
Western Road 111. 1:s
Westhall, Lord, I. zzz
Wet Docks Leith 111. 283
Wettm-all Leut.-ken., 5u G. A.,
Whale fishery of Leith, The early,
Wharton, Duke of, I. 117
Wharton Lane, 11. 221
Wharton Place 11. 359
Whinny Hill ;'he 11. 319
Whim The '111.
WhitAeld, &rge,and the theatre,
11. 316 *317
11. 321,'3E2
111.275 ... GENERAL INDEX. Tytlm of Woodhouselee, William, Tytler, the aeronaut, 111. 135 I. 155 U Umbrella First use of ...

Vol. 6  p. 391 (Rel. 0.1)


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