Old and New Edinburgh

Old and New Edinburgh

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Index for “monks at holyrood”

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THE ROYAL APARTMENTS, HOLYROOD PALACE. ... ROYAL APARTMENTS, HOLYROOD ...

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THE PALACE OF HOLYROOD HOUSE (33), THE SOUTH AND NORTH GARDENS (33), THE ABBEY KIRK (2) AND THE KIRKYARD (2) ... PALACE OF HOLYROOD HOUSE (33), THE SOUTH AND NORTH GARDENS (33), THE ABBEY KIRK (2) AND THE KIRKYARD ...

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scott monument
national art gallery 
holyrood palace
national gallery
st giles ... monument national art gallery holyrood palace national gallery st giles ...

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lies directly at the south-eastern base of Arthur's
Seat, and has long'been one of the daily postal
districts of the city.
Overhung by the green slopes and grey rocks ok
Arthur's Seat, and shut out by its mountainous
mass from every view of the crowded city at its
further base in Duddingston, says a statist, writing
in 1851, a spectator feels himself sequestered from
the busy scenes which he knows to' be in his
immediate vicinity, as he hears their distant hum
upon the passing breezes by the Willow Brae on
the east, or the gorge of the Windy Goule on the
south; and he looks southward and west over a
glorious panorama of beautiful villas, towering ,
'
From the style of the church and the structure of
its arches, it is supposed to date from the epoch of
the introduction of Saxon architecture. A semicircular
arch of great beauty divides the choir from
the chancel, and a Saxon doorway, with fantastic
heads and zig-zag mbuldings, still remains in the
southern face of the tower. The entrance-gate to
its deep, grassy, and sequestered little buryingground,
is still furnished with the antique chain and
collar of durance, the terror of evildoers, named
the jougs, and a time-worn Zouping-on-stone, for the
use of old or obese horsemen.
Some interesting tombs are to be found in the
burying-ground ; among these are the marble obelisk
castles, rich coppice,
hill and valley, magnificent
in semi-tint, in
light and shadow, till
the Pentlands, or the
1 on e 1 y Lam m er m u i r
ranges, close the distance.
The name of this
hamlet and parish has
been a vexed subject
amongst antiquaries,
but as a surname it is
not unknown in Scotland
: thus, among the
missing charters of
Robert Bruce, there is
one to John Dudingstoun
of the lands of
Pitcorthie, in Fife; and
among the gentlemen
GATEWAY OF DUDDINGSTON CHURCH, SHOWING TIIE
JOUCS AND LOUPING-ON-STONE.
slain at Flodden in I 5 I 3
there was Stephen Duddingston of Kildinington,
also in Fife. Besides, there is another place of the
same name in Linlithgowshire, the patrimony of the
Dundases.
The ancient church, with a square tower at its
western end, occupies a green and rocky peninsula
that juts into the clear and calm blue loch. It is
an edifice of great antiquity, and belonged of old
to the Tyronensian Monks of Kelso, who possessed
it, together with the lands of Eastern and Western
Duddingston ; the chartulary of that abbey does not
say from whom they acquired these possessions, but
most probably it was from David I.
Herbert, first abbot of Kelso, a man of great
learning and talent, chamberiain of the kingdom
under Alexander I. and David I., in 1128, granted
the lands of Eastern and Western Duddingston to
Reginald de Bosco for an annual rent of ten marks,
to be paid by him and his heirs for ever.
erected to the memory
of Patrick Haldane of
Gleneagles by his unfortunate
grandson, whose
fate is also recorded
thereon; and that of
James Browne, LLD.,
Advocate, the historian
of the Highlands and
Highland clans, in the
tower of the church.
In the register of
assignations for the
minister's stipends in
the year 1574, presented
in MS. by
Bishop Keith to the
Advocates' Library,
Duddingston is said to
have been a joint dependence
with the
Castle of Edinburgh
upon the Abbey of Holyrood. The old records
of the Kirk Session are only of the year 1631, and
in the preceding year the lands of Prestonfield
were disjoined from the kirk and parish of St.
Cuthbert, and annexed to those of Duddingston.
On the r8th'of May, 1631, an aisle was added
to the church for the use of the Laird of Prestonfield,
his tenants and servants.
David Malcolme, minister here before I 741,
was an eminent linguist in his time, whose writings
were commended by Pinkerton, and quoted with
respect by Gebelin in his Monde Plillit$ and
Bullet in his Mkmoirrs Celtiques; but the church is
chiefly famous for the incumbency of the Rev. John
Thomson, a highly distinguished landscape painter,
who from his early boyhood exhibited a strong
predilection for art, and after being a pupil of
Alexander Nasmyth, became an honorary member
of the Royal Scottish Academy. He became ... directly at the south-eastern base of Arthur's Seat, and has long'been one of the daily postal districts of ...

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OLD AND NEW EDINBURGH. [Arthur's Seat 304
in places where the sandstone has been quarried
(as the craigs were for years to pave the streets of
London), beautiful specimens have been obtained of
radiated haematites, intermixed with steatites, green
fibrous iron ore, and calcareous spar, a most uncommon
mixture.
the glacier are to be found all over these craigs and
Arthur's Seat, and on various parts are found rounded
' boulders, some of which have been worked backwards
and forwards till left at last, stranded by the
farewell ebb of an ancient sea.
The rocky cone of Arthur's Seat is strongly mag-
PLAN OF ARTHUR'S SEAT (THE SANCTUARY OF HOLYROOD).
veins of calcareous spar, talc, zoolite, and amethystine
quartzose crystals; and strange to say several
large blocks of the same greenstone of which they .
are composed are to be found on Arthur's Seat, at
elevations of from eighty to 200 feet above the
craigs.
In ascending the steep path which leads from
Holyrood to the top of the latter, we pass over
layers of sandstone which show ripple marks-the
work of the ice-of unknown ages, grinding and
depositing pebbles, coarse sand, and sedimentary
rock. The bluffs above the path must have had
many a hard struggle, when glaciers crashed against
tion of men of science to this circumstance in 183 I,
when he stated that at some points he found the
needle completely reversed. (Edn. PhiZ. Juurnal,
No. XXII.)
Concerning the origin of the name of this remarkable
mountain, and that of the adjacent craigs,
there have been many theories. Arthur is a name
of-frequent occurrence in Scottish, as well as Welsh
and English topography, and is generally traced by
tradition to the famous Arthur of romance, and
who figures so much in half-fabulous history. From
this prince, who is said to have reigned over Strathclyde
from 508 to 542, when he was shin at the ... AND NEW EDINBURGH. [Arthur's Seat 304 in places where the sandstone has been quarried (as the craigs were for ...

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CONTENTS.
PAGE
INTROEUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . J
CHAPTER I.
P R E H I S T O R I C EDINBURGH.
The Site before the Houses-Traces of Early Inhabitants-The Caledonian Tribes-Agricola's Invasion-Subjection of the Scottish Lowlands
-The Rorrao Way-Edinburgh never occupied permanently-Various Roman Remains : Urns, Coins, Busts ; Swords, Spears, ahd
other Weapons-Ancient Coffins-The Camus, or Cath-st,neOrigin of the name " Edinburgh"-Dinas-Eiddyn-The Battle of Catraeth 9
CHAPTER 11.
THE CASTLE OF EDINBURGH.
Of its Origin and remoter History-The Legends concerning it-Ebranke-St. Monena-Def& of the Sawons by King Bridei-King
Edwin-King Grime-The Story of Grime and Bertha of Badlieu-The Starting paint of authentic Edinburgh History-Sr Margaret
-Het Piety and amiable Disposition-Her Chapel-Her Death-Restoration of her Oratory-Her Burial-Donald Bane-King
David 1.-The Royal Gardens, afterwards the Nonh Loch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I4
CHAPTER 111.
CASTLE OF EDINBURGH (continued).
The Legend of the White Hart-Holyrocd Abbey founded--The Monks of the Castrum Puellarum-David I.% numerous Endowments-His
Death-Fergus. Lord of Galloway, dies there-William the Lion-Castle Garrisoned by the English for Twelve Yean-The Castle a
Royal Residence-The War of the Scottish Succession-The ( h t l e in the hands of Edward 1.-Frank's Escalade-The Lbrtres
Dismantled-Again in the hands of the English-Bullock's Stratagem for its Re-caprurr-David's Tower . . . . . . 21
CHAPTER IV.
CASTLE OF EDINBURGH (confinucd).
Progress of the City-Ambassidor of Charles VI.-Edinburgh burned-Henry IV, baffled-Albmy's Prophecy-Laws lrgvdiog the Building
- of Houses-Sumptuary Laws, 1457-Murder of James I.-Coronationof JarncsI1.-Court Intrigues-Lard Chancellor C r i c h t o n - ~ g ~ c e
of the Earl of Douglas-Faction WaR--l'he Castle Resieged--"The Black Dinner"-Edmburgh Walled-Its Strength -Bale-fires . 26
CHAPTER V.
EDINBURGH CASTLE (continued).
James 111. and his haughty Nobilib-Plots of the Duke of Albany and Earl of Mar-Mysterious Death of Mar-Capture and Escape of the
Duke of Altuny-Captivity of James 111.-Richard of Gloucester at Edinburgh-The "Golden Charter" of the City-"The Blue
Blanket"-Accession of James 1V.-Tournamen%" The Seven Sisters of Bothwick "-The " Fldden Wall"-The Reign of Jarnes V.
-" Cleahse the Causeway !"-Edinburgh under the Factions of Nobles-Hertford Attacks the CastltDeath of Mary of Guise-
Queen Mary's Apartments in the CaStle-BLth of James VI. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
CHAPTER VI.
EDINBURGH CASTLE (continued).
The Siege of r573-The City Bombarded from the Castle-Elizabeth's Spy-D~ry's Dispositions for the Siege-Execution of Kirkddy-
Repar of the Ruins-Execution of Mortan-Visit of Charles 1.-Procession to Holymod-Comnation of Charles 1.-The Struggle
against Epiico-Siege of 1640-The Spectre Drummn-Besieged by Cmmwell-Under the Protector-The Restantion-The
Argyles-The Accession of James VI1.-Sentence of the Earl of Argyle-His. clever Escape-Imprisoned lour yms later-The Last
Sleep of ArgylcHis Death-Tolture of Covenaoters-Proclamation of W d l i and Maq-The Siege of 16@-Intewiew between
Gordon and Dundee-The Cas le invested-Rdiant Defeuce-Capitulation of the Duke of Cordon-The Spectre of Claverhouse . 47 ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . J CHAPTER I. P R E H I S T O R ...

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H o l y d . ] MODERN IMPROVEMENTS. 79
bade them farewell in the Gallery of the Kings,
while a vast concourse assembled outside, all
wearing the white cockade. Another: multitude
was collected at Newhaven, where the Fishermen's
Society formed a kind of body-guard to cover the
embarkation.
'' A few gentlemen," says the editor of " Kay's
Portraits," " among whom were Colonel Macdonel,
the Rev. Mr. (afterwards Bishop) Gillis, John Robinson,
Esq., and Dr. Browne, accompanied His
Majesty on board the steamer, which they did not
leave till she was under weigh. The distress of the
king, and particularly of the dauphin, at being
obliged to quit a country to which they were so
warmly attached was in the highest degree affecting.
The Duc de Bordeaux wept bitterly, and the Duc
d'AngouEme, embracing Mr. Gillis d la 3ranfaise,
gave unrestrained scope to his emotion. The act
of parting with one so beloved, whom he had
known and distinguished in the salons of the
Tuileries and St. Cloud, long before his family had
sought an asylum in the tenantless halls of Holyrood,
quite overcame his fortitude, and excited
feelings too powerful to be repressed. When this
ill-fated family bade adieu to our shores they
carried with them the grateful benedictions of the
poor, and the respect of all men of all parties who
honour misfortune when ennobled by virtue."
In Edinburgh it is well known that had H.K.H.
the late Prince Consort-whose love of the picturesque
and historic led him to appreciate its
natural beauties-survived a few years longer, many
improvements would have taken place at Holyrood
; and to him it is said those are owing which
have already been effected.
Southward of the palace, the unsightly old tenements
and enclosed gardens at St. Anne's Yard
were swept away, including a quaint-looking dairy
belonging to the Duke of Hamilton, and by
1857-8-9 the royal garden was extended south
some 500 feet from the wall of the south wing, and
a new approach was made from the Abbey Hill,
a handsome new guard-house was built, and the
carved door of the old garden replaced in the wall
between it and the fragment of the old abbey
porch ; and it was during the residence of H.R.H.
the Prince of Wales at Holyrood that the beautiful
fountain in the Palace Yard was completed, on the
model of the ancient one that stands in ruin nowy
in the quadrangle of Linlithgow, and which is
referred to by Defoe in his "Tour in Great
Britain."
The fountain rises from a basin twenty-four feet in
diameter to the height of twenty-eight feet, divided
into threestages, andby flying buttresses has theeffect
of a triple crown. From the upper of these the water
flows through twenty ornate gurgoils into three
successive basins. The basement is of a massive
character, divided by buttresses into eight spaces,
each containing a lion's head gurgoil. This is surmounted
by eight panels having rich cusping, and
between these rise pedestals and pinnacles. The
former support heraldic figures with shields. These
consist of the unicorn bearing the Scottish shield, a
lion bearing a shield charged with the arm of
James IV. and his queen, Margaret of England;
a deer supports two shields, with the arms of the
queens of James V., Magdalene of France, and
Mary of Guise ; and the griffin holds the shields of
James IV. and his queen, Margaret of Denmark.
The pinnacles are highly floriated, and ,enriched
with flowers and medallions
It is in every way a marvellous piece of stone
carving. The flying buttresses connecting the stages
are deeply cusped. On the second stage are eight
figures typical of the sixteenth century, representing
soldiers, courtiers, musicians,' and a lady-falconer,
each two feet six inches in height. On the upper
stage are four archers of the Scottish Guard, supporting
the imperial crown. It occupies the site whereon
for some years stood a statue of Queen Victoria,
which has now disappeared.
Still, as of old, since the union of the cron-ns:
for a fortnight in each year the Lord High Conimissioner
to the General Assembly of the Church
of Scotland holds semi-royal state in Holyrood,
gives banquets in its halls, and holds his ledes in
the Gallery of the Kings. ... o l y d . ] MODERN IMPROVEMENTS. 79 bade them farewell in the Gallery of the Kings, while a vast concourse ...

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36 OLD AND NEW EDINBURGH. [Merchistom
captain named ScougaL
After a hard struggle, during which several were
killed and wounded, they stormed the outworks,
and set them on fire to smoke the defenders out of
the donjon keep ; but a body of the king's men
veyed to Leith, and hanged, while he had a narrow
escape, his horse being killed under him by a shot
from Holyrood Palace, Another conflict of a
more serious nature occurred before Merchiston
on the last day of the same month.
attack by firing forty guns from the Castle of Edinburgh.
The men of Scougal (who were mortally wounded)
fled over the Links and adjacent fields in all
directions, hotly pursued by the Laird of Blairquhan.
On the 10th of the subsequent June the
queen's troops, under George, Earl of Huntly, with
a small train of artillery, made another attack upon
Merchiston, while their cavalry scoured all the
fields between it and Blackford-fields now covered
with long lines of stately and beautiful villas-bringing
in forty head of cattle and sheep. By the time
the guns had played on Merchiston from two till
four o'clock p.m., two decided breaches were made
in the walls. The garrison was about to capitulate,
when the assemblage of a number of people, whom
the noise of the cannonade had attracted, was
mistaken for king's troops ; those of Huntly be,came
party of twenty-four men-at-arms rode forth to
forage. The well-stocked fields in the neighbourhood
of the fortalice were the constant scene of
enterprise, and on this occasion the foragers
collected many oxen, besides other spoil, which
they were driving triumphantly into town. They
were pursued, however, by Patrick Home of the
Heugh, who commanded the Regent's Light
Horsemen. The foraging party, whom hunger
had rendered desperate, contrived to keep their
pursuers, amounting to eighty spears, at bay till
they neared Merchiston, when the king's garrison
issued forth, and re-captured the cattle, the collectors
of which '' alighted from their horses, which they
suffered to go loose, and faught CreauZZ'iee," till succoured
from the town, when the fight turned in
their favour. In this conflict, Home of the Heugh,
Sir Patrick Home of Polwarth, four more gentle ... OLD AND NEW EDINBURGH. [Merchistom captain named ScougaL After a hard struggle, during which several ...

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[-wade. THE MELVILLES..
/
LASSWADE CnuKCH, 1773. (Afdw an Etching by Yohn Clerk of E(din.1
CHAPTER XLIII.
THE ENVIRONS OF EDINBURGH-(ccmclz&d).
Melville Castle and the Melvilles-The Viscounts Melvil1::-Sheriffnall-Newton-Monkton-Stonyhill-" The Wicked Colonel Charteris "-
New Hailes-The Stair Obelisk-Lord Hailes-His Death.
MELVILLE CASTLE stands on the left bank of the
North Esk, about five furlongs eastward of Lasswade,
and was built by the first Viscount Melville,
replacing a fortress of almost unknown antiquity,
about the end of the last century. It is a splendid
mansion, with circular towers, exhibiting much
architectural elegance, and surrounded by a finelywooded
park, which excited the admiration of
George IV.
Unauthenticated tradition states that the ancient
castle of Melville was a residence of David Rizzio,
and as such, was, of course, visited occasionally by
Queen Mary; but it had an antiquity much more
remote.
It is alleged that the first Melville ever known
'in Scotland was a Hungarian of that name, who
accompanied Queen 'Margaret to Scotland, where
he obtained from Malcolm 111. a grant of land
in hiidlothian, and where he settled, gave his surname
to his castle, and became progenitor of all
the Melvilles in Scotland. Such is the story told
by Sir Robert Douglas, on the authority of Leslie,
143
Mackenzie, Martin, and Fordun ; but it is much
more probable that the family is of French origin.
Be all that as it may, the family began to be
prominent in Scotland soon after the reign of
Malcolm 111.
Galfrid de Melville of Meldle Castle, in
Lothian, witnessed many charters of Malcolm IV.,
bestowing pious donations on the abbeys of Holyrood,
Newbattle, and Dunfermline, before 1165, in
which year that monarch died.
He also appears (1153-1165) as Vicecomes de
CasieZZo Pzd'Eamm, in the register of St. Marie
of Newbattle. He witnessed two charters of
William the Lion to the abbey of Cambuskenneth,
and made a gift of the parish church of
Melville (which, probably, he built) to the monastery
of Dunfermline, in presence of Hugh, Bishop
of St. Andrews, previously chaplain to King
William, and who died in 1187.
Galfrid of Melville left four sons-Sir Gregory,
his successor, Philip, Walter, and Waren. Of the
last nothing is known, but the other three founded ... THE MELVILLES.. / LASSWADE CnuKCH, 1773. (Afdw an Etching by Yohn Clerk of E(din.1 CHAPTER XLIII. THE ...

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so OLD AND NEW EDINBURGH. [North Loch.
THE garden wherein St. David budded trees and
cultivated such fruits and flowers as were then
known in Britain is a place of flowers and shrubs
again, save where it is intersected by the prosaic
railway or the transverse Earthen Mound; but
those who see the valley now may find it difficult
to realise, that for 300 years it was an impassable
lake, formed for the defence of the city on the
north, when the wall of 1450 was built ; but the
well that fed it is flowing still, as when David
referred to it in his Holyrood charter. Fed by it
and other springs, the loch was retained by a dam
and sluice at the foot of Halkerston's Wynd-the
dam being a passable footway from the city to the
northern fields.
In the royal gardens a tournament was held in
1394 by order of Annabel Drummond, queen of
Robert III., at which, according to Bower, the
continuator of Fordun, her eldest son, David, Duke
HOLPROOI) PALACE, WEST FRONT.
of Rothesay, the same prince who penshed so
miserably at Falkland, presided when in his
twentieth year.
In 1538, prior to committing the effigy of St.
Giles to the flames, the Reformers ducked it in
the loch-it being the legal place for sousing all
offenders against the seventh commandment.
In 1562 the Town Council enacted that all
persons of loose life should be ducked in a certain
part of the loch, wherein a pillar and basin were
formed for the purpose; but this not having the
desired effect, all such persons were ordered to be
committed, without distinction, to the iron room of
the Tolbooth, to be kept therein for a month on
tread and water, and to be then whipped out of
the city at a cart's tail. The deacon of the fleshers
having fallen under this law, the crafts, deeming it
an indignity to their order, assembled in arms,
broke open the prison, and released him.
C H A P T E R X I I .
THE MOUND.
The North Loch used for Sousings and Duckings-The Boats, Swans, Ducks, and Eels-Accidents in the Loch--Last Appearance of the Loch
-Formation of the Mound-" Gcordie Boyd's Mud Brig"-The Rotunda--Royal Irrstitution-Board of Manufactures-History of the Baard
-The Equivalent Money-% J. Shaw Lefevre's Report-School of Design-Gallery of Sculpture--Royal Society of Edinburgh-Museum
of Antiquiua. ... OLD AND NEW EDINBURGH. [North Loch. THE garden wherein St. David budded trees and cultivated such fruits and ...

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GENERAL INDEX 37s
Douglas, Sir William the Black
Knight ofliddesdal;, II.53,III.
354. 355
Dou&s, Baron, 11. 351
Dough., Lady Jane, Execution of,
Douglas of Grantully, Lady Jane,
1. 208, 158, 384, 11. 9, 1x5, 318,
349-351, 111. 9'
Douglas-Stewart, Lady Jane, Story
1. 83. 84
of 11.344.34
Doiglas, Lady?-z::es, 111. 311
Douglas, Campbell, architect, 111.
155
11. 1g0 ; his dagghter, ib.
Douglas General, 1. 281
Do.glas:WiIliam,minialurepainter,
Douglas, the painter, 11. 89, 90
nouglas. the clan, 11. q, 111. 19
" Dou las " the tragedy of, 11, =+,
21 , , . Douglcu, Dr., p&:$G4~I. zg8
Douglas, Francis Brown, Lord Pro-
Dougk Heron &Co. thebanken,
Douglas'Hotel, St. hndrew Square,
Douglas. Abbot William, 11. 48,
Doune, Lord, 11. zoo, 111. 3 4
Doune Tenace. 11. zoo, 111. 74
Dovecots, Superstitious belief in,
Dover, Duke of, 11. 36
Dow Craig, The, 11. 19 IOI, 1.06
Dowie Johnnie, I. rig, 19 * I +
his therm 1. 3 121
"Dowie Coilege:' Club, 1. xi9
Drama, The early Edinburgh, 11.
23, a+, w; denounced by the
Presbytery, II.24,39 ; theCalton
Hill plays 11. IDrawbridge'lhe
Leith 111. I 8
Dreghorn, iord, '11. 156,166, 911.
Dreghorn Castle. 111. 323, *324
Drem Haronyof 11. 233
Dres; Scottish &like of English
Dress 0; the Scottish gentry I
Dromedary A travelling 11. 15
Drum Ha&, 1. 95, 111.'*345, 34<
Drum Sands. near Cramond. 111
17, 151.
vost 11. 284
II. 19: failur; of 11'. 35
I. mz, 11. 174 342
111. 116
111. 319
32 3
in 1;g 11. 280
centuryago, 111. ~ 3 9
brother, 111. 75
hummond of Hawthornden thi
pat and historian, I. IS+, I1
a?, 54.62, 127, 217, =2,zSg, 111
26 28 ,354.35 ; Ben onson'
vi:it, ii?. 354 ; tte cavalier an<
poet,III. 355; hisloves,ib.; hi
death ib.
Drummbnd, Bishop W i l l i Aber
nethy, 1. a6r, a64
Drummond, Colin, physician, 11
299,301
Drummond, Dr. John, 11.147
Drummond, Gearge, I. 176, 183
Drummond Hay, Coins of, 11. 87
Drummond, am-, artist and anti
UXkUl, It'. b,'III.84, I W , ~
I)rummond Jean I. ga
Drummond of &mock, The, Ill
Drummoud Place. I. 217. 280. I1
Irawings by, I. *at%, *368
354 .. .
'9'7 1927 I 7 289 Drummond $&e Gardens, 11. 19
Drumniond Street, I. 38, 11. 3 y
335. 338, 111. 3, 7
Drummore Lord I. 251 11. 348
DrumquhGel d i r d of,'I. 259, 26
Drumsheunh 'villane. 11. 211. w
111. 7rr y65; vicw'from, 11i.x-6
Drumsheugh, Forest of, I. 237, 11
%h 14:
Drumsheugh House, 11. 115,
Drumsheugh Park, 111. 70, fl
111. 139
h r y , Sir Willim, I. 48, 49, 116,
)ruds gun-battery, I. fl, 330
111. 238 ; trcachcry Of, 111. 133,
134
Duchess of Bragarm," Play of
the, I. 343
hddingston, I. 383, 11. 'go, 303,
307, *309, 3x1, 3139 3141 315, 316,
3x7, 318. 347. 111. 86. 131, 134,
146, 165,314 ; origin of the name,
11. 914 ; barony of 11. 316
hddingston Chnrc'h, 11. * 312:
*313,314; gatewayof,II.*314,
famous ministers of, 11. 315, 317
hddingston House 11. 317
3uddineston Loch,'I. 8, 11, 203,
327, 11. 86, 315. *316, 111. 58,
143 ; skating thereon, 11. 315
h f f , the actor, I. 350
Iuffus, Lady, 11. 333
hgdd Stewart's monument, 11.
den, 111. 3567 357
1.9, * I11
Duke of Albany (see Jam= Duke
Duke of Albany's Own Hwh-
Duke oi Hamilton's apartments,
Duke S t m t 11.117 181
Duke's Walk, The,'I. 8, 3la, 11.
Dumfries, &:f, I. go, 11. 166,
of Albany)
landers 11.
H o l p d &lace, I. 326
3'33, 306, 07
111. 12
Square I1 343
Dumbrect's Hotel, St. Andrew
Dunbar kari of 111. 143
Dunba; Sir Jaies 11.2%
Dunbar: william, burns' lines on,
I. 142, 235, 236, 11. 255
Dunbar Battle of (sec Battles)
Dunbar$ Close I. 6, 5511. 3
Duocan, AdmLl, 11.343, 111. 158,
"23
3797 384,II.I54,174 31% 111.39
Duncan, Dr. .Andrev, physician, 1.
Duncan Lady 11.343
Duncan: the p h e r , 11. 93
Duncan's Land, 111. 78
Dundas. Sir Lawrence, I. 217, XI.
nu,'& Sir ?homas, 11. l a
Dundas: Henry, Viscount Melville
Dundas. Lord Chief B a n . 11.210.
86 196, 171 282
(sec Melville)
343
Dundas, Robcrt Lord Amiston 1.
123,15g,172, 42, 11. 39 II1.;83
Dundas, President, fatie; of Lord
Melville, 1. 242, 346, 11. 210
Dundas, Lord Pradent, I. &,It.
38
Dundas, Lord Advocate, 11.343
Dundas, Sir David, 1. 366, 11. 287.
111. 105. 264: d o t e of h i
. . bf, rri. 7
111. 86,105
Dnnda. oJAske, Bamn, 11. 171
Dundas of Bsefhwood, Sir Kobert,
Dun&, Lady Emily, 11. xg8
nundas Lady Eleonora, 111. 2 9
D u n 4 Col. Walter, 1. 54
Dundas, Lieut.&. Francis, 11.
Dundas, Mr.. 11. m, 283
Dundas riots, 1791. 11. 343
Dundas Street, 11. 199; its Rsi.
dents, 11. ~gg, 111. 162
Dundee, Viscount, I. 62, 63,65,7t
Dundonald, Earl of, 1. 105,331.11.
Dundrennan Lord 11. 175
Dunglas and Greethaw, Baron, I1
279
Dunkeld, Bishops of, I. 39,253. I1
54, 251, 287, 111. 13% 307, 314
Dunfernline, Earl of, I. 3r6.11. z&
Ddermline, Lord, 111. p, 32
Dunfermline, H o w of the A&
210, 342
a579 27"
of, I. 212. 25
Dunlop, Dr. Jam, Fkquest to thq
University, 111. 26
Dunmore Earl of 11. 310
Dunn's dote1 II.'Ba 166, 161
Dupplin, Yi'ount, 1: 50
Durie. Lord, I. i68,242,III.31~,33!
Durie, AbborsofMelrose, I.a53,25.
hrie George, Abbot of Dunfermline'
I. 2x2
>yce,'the painter 11.87
Iysart, Lyonell L r l of,' 2I.ip;
Countess of, 11. 167
Jyvours stane, The, I. 152
E
Fade and Henderson. nurservmen. . I 111. 159
Eagle's Rock, Cramond, Ill. 315
Ear and Eye Dispenw-, I. a86
Earl Gre Street 11. 2x8
Earthen hound, i. gS, 102,106,116,
255, 11. 31. 80, 82. 9% 199. 4 3
bead of the, 11. 93-100; new
from Princes Street, Phtr r7
East and W a t Mayfield Houses,
111. 51
3x6, 349,111. .so
East Cross Causeway, 1. 384. 11.
Eat end of High Street, Nethei
Bow, and west end of Camngate,
T 1 ~ E
Eastbaik. Lord, 11. 10
Fst Gardens, 11.127
East Hermitage Place, Leith, 111
East India Club, 111. 125
E& London Street 11. 185
East Maitland Strc;t, 11. aoq
East Morningside H o w , 111. 47
East Pilton, 111. '309
East Princes Street Gardens. I1
166
100 a14
East b e e n Street Gardens, 11. XI;
East Register Street, 11. 176
East Richmond Street, 11. 337
East Warriston House, 111. IM
Easter, The district, 11. 221
Easter and Wester Pilton, 111. p
Easter Coates. Mansionof, 11. III
Easter Hill, 11. 199
Easterlings, 111.94
Easter Road, 11. 309, III.128,13i
Easter Wemy4 I. 3ag
Eastern and Wekern Duddiingston
133, 15% 158 160
11. 3r4
Echo Bank, 111. 5 4 57; old how
Echbing Rmz, The, 11. 313
Edgar, Rear-Admiral, 111. 142
Edgar's map of Edinbur h, 1. 3"
338, 34% 3% 3731 38551. 17, 81
Edgefield's (Lord), House, I. 241
Edge-tool maker, The first. 11. a6
Edinburgh Academy 111. 81
E$nburgh, Arms of ;he City of, 1
Edinburgh Castle, I. *I, z, 14-79
Stawand Camden'saccannts 15
the lecend of the White fiar,
21; Holyrood Abbey, oa; th
monks of the Castrum Puelb
rum, ib. ; capture of the Castle b
the English, ib.; it becomes
royal.residence,,a3; wars of th
Scottlsh succession, ib . "Wa
lace's Cradle," 24, *z;f the foi
tress dismantled, a+ ;again in th
hands of the En lah, 25' Bu
locks suacagem t r its reAveq
ib.;repairofthefort~,26;pr(
gress of the City, ib. : Henry I\
mvades the City, 27; the Englii
baffled, ib. : Al+y's pr0phe.q
ab.; lamre rding the buMm
of houses. ir; sumptuary law
28 ; murder of James I., 29 ; c1
ronation of James 11.. ib. ; Caul
intrigues, 29,30 ; Lord Chancellc
Crichton, 30; arrogance of t h
Earl of Douglas ib. : the I' blac
dinner " ib . th; Castle besiegec
31 . th; &;'fortified i6. ; +m<
IIi. and his haugdiy no ill@
32 ; plots of the Duke of Alban
and Earl of Mar, ib. ; mysterioi
death of Mar, ib.; apture an
escape of the Duke ofAlbany, 3 .E.; ciptitity of James HI., y
ichard of Gloumter at Edii
burgh,+.; the"C;ol$m Chartei
of the city, ib. ; the Blue RL)
ket," 34, * 36 ; accession of Jam
at 111. 5
2- 246,267. VI, 330,334
16
IV 35 : tournaments, ib. : " thc
se& sisters ot' Borthwick." v.5.'-
36.; the " Ylodden Wall," 38, +o ;
reign of Jam- V 38-42 ; Edmburgh
underthe f&tionsofnobles,
38-40 ; the castle attacked by
the Earl of Hertford, 43,111.16g;
death of Queen Mary of Guise,
I. 44, 45; accession of Mary
Stuart, 45h; birth of Jam- VI
46 *48: t esregeof1~73,47, I I f ?$ ; the a t y bombarded from the
astle, I. 47 ; Elkabeth'sspy, 48;
Sir W. Drury's dispositions for
the &Fe, 48,49 : execuaon of Sir
W: h.rkaldy, 50.: repairof the
ruins, ab. : execution of the Earl
of Morton, ib.; visit of Charles
I p, 51; procession to Holyr&,
Si : coronation of Charles
I., ib. : the struggle against episcopacy,
g1,52; siege of 1644 52 -
the spectre drummer 54; th;
castle baieged by CroLwell ib. ;
ten years' peace in Edinbkh
55 ; the Restoration, ib. ; th;
Argylcs, 56-58 ; the accession of
ames VII., 58 ; sentence of the
rl of Argyle, 58,59 ; h~ clever
59 ; the last sleep of Ar-
?e?.; hisdeath, ib. ; tortureof
the covenanters, 59,150; proclamation
of Williarn and Mary, pII;
the siege ,of 1689 6 internew
between the Duk;p?&rdon and
Viscount Dundee, ib. ; brilliant
defence of the &de, 63,64 ; Qpitulation
of the Duke of Gordm,
65 ; inner gateway of the Castle * 65 ; the spectre of Clawhaw:
66 ; torture of Neville Payne, id. ;
Jacobite plots, ib.: entombing of
thc regalia 66, 67; project for
surprismg ;he fortnss, SI ; right
of sanctuary abolished. ib. ; Lord
Drummonfla plot, 68 : Dome acv.
biteprixmen, 6g; "rebeldies"
70 ; iunes Macgregor, ib. ; de
at escape, 71 : tears as to the
destruction of the crown, sword,
and m p ~ e , ib.; crown-room
opened in 1794 and in 1817 id. ;
Mons Mag, 74 ; general d&p
tion of the Castle, 7 5 7 9
Edinburgh Castle and nty Ancient
and modern vieis of. 1. q. 17.
k
Cast / e vaults, 70 71 ; attempts
-
from various points, 11.193) 216,
111. 117
Edinburgh in 1745 1. 331-334;
Charles Stuart in \he mty, I. 323
Edinburgh Origin of the name, I.
12 ; the infant city, I. 26 ; first
enclosed by walls, 1. 31
Edinburgh and Glasgow Railway,
11. 19 113
Edinburgh and Leith Seamen's
Friendly Society, 111. q
Ediabzdrqh Aa'vmtkr, The, 1.318,
339, 11. 'VV 11% '7% 3a4 35'.
III.63r703 73 752 7% 85, 11% 123,
124l135.139.154,~34.~35.258,306
Edinburgh Assembly Rooms, 1.314,
inburgh Assoclation for Impmving
the Condition of the Poor, 11.
162
Edinburgh Arscdation of Science
and Arts, 11. 143
Edinburgh Bishop of 111.147
Edinburgh' Blind Asyhm, 111. a54
Edinburgh Bamic W e n , Leith
Walk 111. 98. its coratm ib.
Edinb&h &teryCom&y, 11.
"17
Edinburgh Chamber of Commerce
and Manufactures, I. 379, 111.
288
Edinburgh Che5 Club, 11.152
Edinburgh Club, The old, 111.
Ed:s7 * 3 4 3x7 ... INDEX 37s Douglas, Sir William the Black Knight ofliddesdal;, II.53,III. 354. 355 Dou&s, Baron, 11. ...

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the permanent and undisputed capital of Scotland.
Sorrow and indignation spread over all the realm
when the fate of James was heard, and no place
seemed to afford such security to the royal person
as the impregnable Castle of Edinburgh j thus
Queen Jane, ignorant of the ramifications of that
.conspiracy by which her princely husband was
,slain (actually in her arms), instantly joined her
.son James II., who since his birth had dwelt
there. It was then in the hands of William Baron
.of Crichton-a powerful, subtle, and ambitious
statesman, who was Master of the Household.
with every solemnity, on the 25th of March, 1437.
The queen-mother was named his guardian, with
an allowance of 4,000 merks yearly, and Archibald
the great Earl of Uouglas and Angus (Duke of
Touraine) was appointed lieutenant-general of the
kingdom. During the two subsequent years the
little king resided entirely in the Castle under the
custody of Crichton, now Lord Chancellor, greatly
to the displeasure of the queen and her party, who
found him thus placed completely beyond their
control or influence.
In short, it was no longer the queen-mother,
RUINS OF THE WELL-HOUSE TOWER. (~m a D7awifirb W ~ Z Z ~ ~ X . paton, R.s.A.)
Within forty days nearly all concerned in the
imurder of the late king were brought to Edinburgh,
where the ignoble were at once consigned
to the hangman; but for the Earl of Athol and
bother titled leaders were devised tortures worthy
.alone of Chinese or Kaffir ingenuity. Crowned
by a red-hot diadem as " King of Traitors," at the
Market Cross, after undergoing three days of un-
.exampled agonies in sight of the people and the
Papal Nuncio, afterwards Pius II., the body of the
earl was dragged nude through the streets ; it was
then beheaded and quartered.
On the assembly of the Lords of Parliament,
-their first care was the coronation of James II.,
-who was conducted in procession from the Castle
$0 the church of Holyrood, where he was crowned,
but the crafty Crichton, who had uncontrolled
custody of the little sovereign, and who thus was
enabled to seize the revenues, and surround him
by a host of parasites, who permitted neither her,
nor the Regent, Sir Alexander Livingstone of
Callender, to have any share in the government
A bitter feud was the consequence, and Scotland
again was rent into two hostile factions, a state of
matters of which the English could not, as usual,
make profit, as they were embroiled among themselves.
The queen remained with the regent at
Stirling, while her son was literally a prisoner at
Edinburgh ; but, womanlike, the mother formed a
plan of her own to outwit the enemy.
Visiting the Castle, she professed a great regard
for the Chancellor, and a desire to be with her son, ... permanent and undisputed capital of Scotland. Sorrow and indignation spread over all the realm when the fate ...

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C0NTENTS.
CHAPTER I.
THE CANONGATE.
@AGE
I& Origin-Songs concerning it-Reaords-Market Cross-St. John's and the G i h Crosses-Early History-The Town of Her-
Canongate Paved-The Governing Body-Raising the Devil-Purchase of the Earl of Roxbwgh's "Superiority"-The Foreign
Settlement-George Heriot the Elder-Huntly's HouseSu Walter Scott's Story of a Fire--The Mo- Land-How of Oliphant
of Newland, Lord David Hay, and Earl of Angus-Jack's Land-Shoemaker's Lands-Marquis of Huntly's House-Nisbet of Duleton'd
Mansion-Golfers' Land-John and Nicol Paterson-The Porch and Gatehouse of the Abbey-Lucky Spellcc . . . . . . I
CHAPTER 11.
THE CANONGATE (continwd).
Execution of the Marquis of Montrose-The First Dromedary in Scotland-The streets Cleansed-Raxbugh House--London Stages of r71a
and 175+-Religious Intolerance-Declension of the Burgh . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
CHAPTEK 111.
THE CANONGATE (con#i+vwd).
Closes and AlleF on the North Side-Fiesh-market and Coull's Cloxs-Canongate High School-&e's Close--Riillach's Lodging-New
Street and its Residents-Hall of the Shoemakers-Sir Thos Ddyell-The Canongate Workhouse-Panmure HousbHannah
Robertson-The White Horse Hostel-% Water Gate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
CHAPTER IV.
THE CANONGATE (continued).
Closes and Alleys on the South Side-Chessel's Court-The Canongate Theatre-Riots Therein-"Douglas" Performed-Mr. Diggea and Mra.
Bellamy-St. John's Close-St. John's Street and iks Residents-The Haaunennan's Clo~-Horse Wynd, Abbey-House of Lord Napier 22
CHAPTER V.
THE CANONGATE (roniinued).
Separate or Detached Edifices therein-Sir Walter Scott in the Canongate--The Parish C%urch-How it came to be built-Its Official
Position- Its Burying Ground-The Grave of Fergusson-Monument to Soldiers interred the-Ecceotric Henry PrentiaThe
Tolbth-Testimony as to its Age-Its latu uses-Magdakne Asylum-Linen Hall-Many House-Its Hstorical Associari ons-The
WiotooXo-Whiteford Howe-The Dark Story of Queuriberry House . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 7
CHAPTER VI.
THE CANONGATE (coduded).
mthiin H u t - M PalmerstowSt. Thomas's Hospita-The Tennis Court and its Theawe4&wen Mq's --The Houxr of Croftan-
Righandclock-mill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
CHAPTER ' VII.
HOLYROOD ABBEY.
Foundation of the Ahbey-Text of King David's Charter-Original Extent of the Abbey Char&-The sc-alled Miracdau b - T h e
Pawnages of the Canons-Its Tbirtyanc Abbots-Its Relics and Revenues . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 ... I. THE CANONGATE. @AGE I& Origin-Songs concerning it-Reaords-Market Cross-St. John's and ...

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GENERAL INDEX. 379
.Her!or brewery, The, 11.374
Henot free schools, 11. 374 37:
Heriot Kow, 11.1~5, 158,194, 201
.Heriot's Bridge, 11. 234
Heriot's Green, 11. 371, 372, 373
Heriot's Hill, I l l . 86, 87
.Heriot's Hill House, 111. *88
Heriot's Hospital, I. 48, 55, 64, 76,
134, 176, 242, 335, 11. 33s 84, 115.
its designer, rb. ; curious itemsof
expenditure, ib.; generaldescription
of the building 11. 369, 370 ;
views of the hospidl, II.364,368,
Heriot's School, I. 198, 11. 184, 250,
37% 373, 376, 379. pb& 24
274
Lord)
265. 266
266
Heriot's Trust, 11. 358
Hermand, Lord (sec Fergusson,
Hermitage, The, Leith Links, 111.
Hermitage Hill, Leith, III.175,186,
Hermitage Place, 111. 79
Hermitage Terrace 111. 266
Heron's Court. I. ,b~
Herries, Sir Rbberi I. 179
Herring Sir John 111. 346
Herrini fishery, $he Newhaven,
111. $2 - -
Hertford, Earl of, I. 43, lob, 217,
11. 2, 48, 56, 111. 169, 179, 218,
3'07 347,
.Heme Prinrr of 111. 194
High kalton T i e street 11. 103
High Churc'h The, &.* Giles's
Cathedral, 1: 14x '148 149
High Constables o t the dalton, 11.
'03
High Constables, Society of, 11. 23
Highest buildings in Edinburgh, I.
Hiehla;ldar;dAericultural Society's
*168 191 193
chambers, I.'zg~, zg
Highland Society of &cotland, I.
$94,295
ighlanders in Edinburgh, I. 322
323,324. 11,133 ; employmental
11. 235 ; Gaelic chapel for ib.
Highlanders,Revultofthe S'eaforth,
Highrtggs, 11. 222, 223, 230, 325,
366 111. Z,%
Highiiggs 80use 11. 223
.High School of ddinburgh, I. 110,
963, 11. 1 1 ~ 1 1 3 , 168, 2-1 259,
303, 327, 314! 111. 3, 86;k:story
of the old igh School, 11. 287-
193; thesecond High School, 11.
193; the new High School, 11.
1x0-114; views of the High
School, 11. *113, *q*, *z#;
carved stone over the entrance to
the first High School 11. .
eminent masters and kctors:%:
2-06
11. 307-310
Hiih S&Al brawls 11.289
High School Close '11. 17
High School Club'The, 11. 113
High School, Leith 111. *265
High Fhool Wynd, I. 11. 249,
High'School Yard, 11. 275, 293,
J&h'J%t, The, I. P, 31, 43, 79,
947 I212 123, 126, 1.53, 1541
155,183,187,191-a82~335,II. 64,
95, 119, '57s 239, 24'2 2431 25%
138, I++; conflicts in the, I. 39,
50, 55 194-196. first paved and
lighteh, I. '92'; high-storeyed
houses, ib. ; removal of household
garbage, 193; the night watch,
194 ; use offire-arms in the streetr
forbidden, ib . fights between
rival clans, 1&196 ; abduction
of women and girls, 197 ; sump
tuary laws a inst women 197
198 ; the LorrF'rovost, 19;; th;
a t y police, ib. ; banquets at the
C m , zoo; city constables, I.
203 ; cleanliness enforced, ib. 1
the city lighted withgas, ib. ; the
Black Turnpike, zq; bitter re.
ception of Queen Mary, ib. ; the
house of Fentonbans. 207 j Ban-
250
02
253, 286, 287, 112 I2
283, 2938 294, 375, Id. 6, Ia,47.
natwe, the printer ib. . the
Bishop's Land, 208 its dishguished
residents, ib. ; the Earls
of Crawford zag - the first shop
of Allan Kakay,' 210 ; Ancrum
Hou~e, zrz: the first shop of
Constable and Co., 212 213;
Manners and Millar, book&llers,
213; ancient houses, ib. ; Knox's
house and church, ib. ; &herino
mansion, ib. ; the preaching
window Knox'shouse 214; house
of Archbishop Shkpe, 21s ;
the Nether Bow Port, ar,; the
earlier gate ib, ; the Kegent
Morton's su&riw party, 218. the
last gate, ib.; the ancient marirets,
zr9 ; house of Adam Rothwell
Bishop of Orkney, ib. ; the bishoi
and Queen Mary, ib . Sir Wilrim
Dick of Braid, z;dr 221 ; his
colo~sal wealth, a m ; hard fortune,
ib. ; Advocates' Close, ib. ;
Sir James Stewart's house, ib. ;
Andrew Crosbie, ib. ; Scougal's
picture-gallery, 223 ; Roxburghe
Close, ib. ; Warriston's Close. ab. ;
William and Robert Chambers
224-226 ; house of Sir Thond
Craig, 226 ; Sir Archibald Johnston
of Warriston 226 127 ; Mary
King's Close i27 f Mr. and
Mrs. Colthearh ghostly visitors
rb. . Craig's Close 229 * Andd
H& bwkselly, b. ; tke " Isle
of Man Arms, 230; the Cape
Club cb . the Poker Club ib .
Old k&p Office Close, '23; f
Fortune's lavern, ib. ; the Countess
of Eglinton, 231-234 ; murderous
riot in the Close, 234 ; the
Anchor Close 235; Dawney
Dou 185's tavirn 235 236; the
CpcLllan Club,' 235 f Smellie's
printing-office 235, 236. Mylne's
Square, 2 3 d z 3 8 : ~orld AI='s
house, 237; thecountess ofSutherland
and lady Glenorchy,
237, 238; Halkerston's Wynd
238 : Kinlochs Clox, ib. ; Car!
rubber's Close, 238140 ; Capt.
Matthew Hendemn, 239 ; Alkn
R-y's theatre, ib.; its later
tenants, id. ; the Tailors' Hall
239,240 ; *' Hyve awa, lads, I d
no deid yet ib. . Chalmers'
Close, -16. ; hope's'house, ib, ;
Sandiland's Close, ib. ; Bishop
Kennedy's house, ib.; Baron
Grant's House, ,:41; the " Salamander
Land 242 ; the old
Fishmarket Close, ib. : Heriot's
mansion ib. . the Deemster's
house ib.; Bbrthwick's Close
ib. ; I k d Dune's house, i6. ; th;
old Assembly Rooms, ib. ; Miss
Nicky Mum 243 ; formalities
of the balls it: ladies' fashions
245; Bell': Wynd $6. . BIa&
Street and Hunter'; Squire, ib. ;
' Kennedy's Close, ib. ; Niddry's
Wynd, ib. ; Provost Nicol
Edwards' house, 245, 246, 247 :
Lockhart's Court, r6. ; St. M a j s
Chapel, lb. ; Masonic Lodge
meetings, ib. ; Lady Glenorchy,
ib. ; story of Lady Grange 248-
251; St. Cecilia Hall Z;I; its
old-fashioned concerts,'ib. ; the
belles of the eighteenth century,
ib. . the name Niddry, 252 ;
Diikson's and Cant's Closes, 253 ;
house of David Allan, zb. ; Rosehaugh's
Close, id. ; house of the
Abbots of hIelrase, ib. ; Sit
George Mackenzie of Rwhaugh,
254 ; Lady Anne Dick, lb. ; Lord
Strichen, ib.; the manners 01
17 0, ib. ; Provost Grieve, 255 ; J t o n Dhu, ib. ; Lad Lovat's
Land, ib. ; Walter Ehepman,
rimer, ib. ; Lady Lovat 257 ;
backfriars Wynd, 258 : Sir Wdrim
Stewart slain by Rothwell
259 ; escape of Archbisho;
Sharpe, rb . Cameronian meeting-
house, ' >b. ; house of the
Regent Mortan ib. : Catholic
chapels of the'eighteenth cen
tury, 261. Bishop Hay ib.
Baron Smi;h's chapel, 262'; Car
d i d Beaton's house 263; Its
historical association:, io. ; IU
ultimate occupants 264; the
United Industrial School, 265 ;
Toddricks Wynd, 2 6 6 ; Lord
Leven's house in Skinner'sClose,
267 ; the Scottish Mint, ib. ;
Argyle's lodging,a70; Dr.Cullen,
271 ; Elphinstone's Court, 272;
Lords Loughborough and Stonefield
z7r 273' Lord Selkirk 274'
Dr. kutierfoid, ib. ; house Af th;
Earls of Hyndford ib. ; the
three romps of MoAreith, 275;
Anne Countess of Balcarres, 276 ;
Souti Foulis' Close, ib. ; Fountain
Close. ib. ; Endmylie's Well
ib. ; house of Bailie Fullerton:
277; Koyal College of Physicians,
278 ; Tweeddale Close, ib. ; hollse
of the Marquis of Tweeddale, ib.;
the British Linen Company, 279 ;
murder of Begbie, 280; the
World's EndClose,z81; the Stanfield
tragedy, ib. : titled residents
in the old closes, 282
ligh Street, Portobello, 111. 152,
* I53
Till Mrs. the xulptor, 11. 131
-Iill!house'Field, Leith, 111. go, 273
lill Street, 11. 159, 165
lobart Lord 11. 373
logarih Gedrge W.S., 11. 26
7ogarth' The Scbttish I. 253
logg. J k e s , the EttrigkShepherd,
1. 7, 15. 339, 11. '27, 1409 142,
'7% '99, 111. 747 7 I 126, 1277 I79
Holderness Robert %arl of, 11. 39 ' Hole in the Wall" Inn, 11. 268
Holland John projector of the
Bank ;If Scotlkd, 11. 93,95
HoLstein Visit of the Duke of, to
Edinbhrgh I. III
Holy Cross, Abbey of the, 11. 288
Holy Cross, Kirk of the, 11. ~ o o
Holyrood Abbey, I. 19, m, 4 4 116,
139, 2f7.s 23p 11. 11, 42-60> 379;
its ongin, 1. 42, 43, 4; its endowments
11. 44, 46, 111. 49;
list of abbbts, I1.46-49,III. 41 ;
seal of the Abbey, 11. *46; its
relicsandrevenues, II.5o;church
of 11. * 5 6 ; nave of, 11. *57;
d&s;truction of, 11. 57, 58 : right
of sanctuary, 11. 60 ; Hollar's
print of, 11. *45 ; Gothic porch
and gatehouse 11. 11
Holy Rood Acd, The, 11. 239
H+rocd, Ancient chapel of the,
11. 239
Holyrood chapel, St. Giles's church.
Holyrood dairy 11. * 305
Holyrwd Foun$in,The, 11. g *SI
Holyrood House, I. 199 ; the &&I
Royal, 11. * 49
Holyroodhouse, Lord, I. go, 158,
zm. aza, 11. 49,111. zgg
Holyrood Palace, I. xi 6, 40, 42>
54 55, 58, 7% 791 90. '75,204, 11.
at, 11. 66-7'. 111. 4, 7 ; Charles
I. at, 11. 73; James Duke oi
York and Albany at, I. 335 11.
75, 111. 11; arrival of Pr'incc
Charles Edward at, I. 316; Comtc
d'Artois at, 11. 76, 78 ; isometric
projectionof the Palace, 11. 61
views of the Palace, 11. 68, * 6q
*72;modemviews, II.*73 *Bo
81 ; monuments, I. 196, zm: 238
the old Mint, I. 267 : sanctuaq
of, 11. 11, 281, 303 ; plan ofth:
sanctuary, 11. * 3 q ; Hollar:
print of, 11. ' 45
yard, I. 256
L 7 9 , 236, 354; Queen Maq
Holyrood Tennis Court, 111. 125
Home Earl of, 11. 31
Home: Lord, I. 40, 49,II. zzz, 111
Home, Sir John, I. 102
Home, Alexander Lord, Provost
Home Alexander Provost 11. z&
Home: George, Cierk of .%Lion, I
29. 134, 298
11. 279
zar
Home, Sir George, Lord Provost
Home ofthe Heugh, Patrick, III.3(
Home of Polwarth, Patrick, I1
Home of Wedderburn,David, 1.4, t:
111. 46
180. 111. 36
Iome, NinQn, the dominie, 111.156
Iome Lady I. a82 11. 31
iamb, John,'autho:of '' Douglas,"
11. 24-7 127.334 111. 45,21g,
24o-zp ; hisancestors, III. 240 ;
h~s death and burial-place, ib.
Iome Street, 11. zaz
iowerton the actor, I. 350
Iornildon'Hill (see Battles)
ioneyman, Bishop ofOrkney, 1.259
ioneyman, Sir William, Lord
Armadale, 1. 259
Iooly, Mount, I. 383
looped ladies, r. z++ 245
iope of Granton, imd Jwtice-
Clerk, 1. 159. 11. 159
lope, Right Hon. Charles, of the
Edinburgh Volunteers, 11. *I 7
mal 268, 372, 374, 111. 311 ; k
conduct as Lord Advocate, 11.
102 a03
lor, I. 36 , 111 77
maAsion of, 11.243
house of I. 240
{ope: %Alexander, Lord Rankeil-
<ope Sirlrchibald, 111. 270
4ope' Sir Thomas, I. 116, 11. 243;
<ope, John de, I. 94; supposcd
<ope Major-General, 11, 19
<ope' Profesar John 11. 293
lope' President 11. ;gs
4ope'of Carse, iI. 281
lope of Craighall, The family os
111.311.
111. 316
agriculturist, 11. 3;7
*ope of Craighall, Sir Thomas,
Hope of Rankeillor Thomas, the
Hope Dr. John, I. 3631*364. 111.161
Hope' Robert, physician, 11. zg8
Hope' Park, 11. 339,347, 348, W.
Kope Jark Chapel, 111. 51
Hope Park Congregational Church,
Rope Park Crescent, 11. 349
Hope Park Terrace 11. 3
Hope Park United Pregyterian
Church, 111. 51
Hope Street, 11. 130,165
Hope's Close, 1. 116
Hopetoun, Earl of, I. 238, 3
354 513 I!I. 54
111. 5'
111. 57
Hope Park En4 11. ~ 9 , 351, 35%
, 11.
38, 1% 171, 1%~ 34% IIp16rs
190, 323,362; houseof, I. 40, IL
26; monument to 11. 171 .
Hopetoun Fenciblei, 11. 236
Hopetoun House 111. 77
Hopetouu Laird'of 111. 57
Hopetoun'Rooms h. 158, 111. 78
Hopkins, Mrs. a&ess, 11. 24
Horn Charity,'The, I. 308
Horn Lane 111. 76
Horn Orde: The 111. IZZ
Horner, Frkcis,'I. 379, 11. 187,
Horner, Leonard, I. 165, 291, 379,
292, 29.52 347
111. 342,
Horseracing on Leith Sands, 111.
Horse Wynd, I. 267. 282, 11.27, 38,
Hos~italbfO&Mlessed Lady,I.po
Hospital of St. Thomas, 11. 39 47
Hospitallers of St. Anthony, L k h ,
Hotels, The street for, 11. 123
House of Correction, I. 301.302
House of Industry 111. 125
House in High &reet, with memorial
window (' Heave awa,
Lids, I'm no deidyet," I. z4oo,*24r
H o u ~ of the Kirk-of-Field, 111.
268-270
39 .& 255 256, 158, 274, 282
111. 216
4, 6, 7
Household garbage, The streets
formerly receptacles for 1. 192
Houses in the New Tom: Number
Houston, Archibald, Murder of, I.
Houston Lad 11. 331
Howe Sireet, fi. 1%
Howard, the philanthropist, I. 132,
Howf The Leith 111. 23r
Hugk Mill& (scs kfiller)
Hugh Miller Place, 111. 75
Human heads Exposure of 11.4
Humane smiity of Leith, ~ I I . a%
. - 48, !49
Of, 11. 175
'96
359
-
... INDEX. 379 .Her!or brewery, The, 11.374 Henot free schools, 11. 374 37: Heriot Kow, 11.1~5, 158,194, ...

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... Vlll OLD' AND NEW EDINBURGH.
CHAPTER XXXIX.
, T H E W E S T B 0 W (conclud-d.) PAGE
A Hand to Hand Combat in the Bow-Murder'in 1h5 in the Bow-The House of Lord Ruthven-The Hidden Sword-Processions in the
Bow-The Jacobite Prisoners-House of Provost Stewart-A Secret Entertainment to Prince Charles-Donaldson the Printer-State of
Printing and Publishing in his Day-The Edimburck Adwcrfiser-Splendid Fortunc of his Descendant-Town House ,of the
Napiers of Wrightshouse-Trial of Barbara Napier for Witchcdt-Clcckmaker's Land-Paul Romieu-The Mahogany Land-
Duncan Campbell, Chirurgeon-Templar Houses
.
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 315
CHAPTER XL.
E D I N B U R G H I N 1745.
Pmvost Stewart-Advance of the Jacobite Clans-Preparations far DefenctCapturc of the City-Lachiel's Surp&-Entance of Prince
Charles-Arrival at Holyrood-JamesVIII. Proclaimed at the Cross-Conduct of the Highland Tmps in the City-Colquhoun Grant-
A Triumphal ProcessiOn--Guest's Council of War-Preston's Fidelity . . . . . . . . . . . . . jZZ
CHAPTER XLI.
EDINBURGH IN 1745 (concluded),
General Guest's "Brave~~"-Popularity of the Prince-Castle Blockaded-It Fires on the City-Leith Bombarded-End of the Blockade
-Departure of the Highland Army for ' England-Prisoners in the Castle-Macdonald of Teindreich-Duke of Cumberland in
Ediiburgh-Burning of the Standards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 329
CHAPTER XLII.
T H E NORTH BRIDGE.
The New Town projected by Jams VIL-The North Bridge and other Structures by the Earl of Mar, 1728-Oppased in 175g-Foundation
Stone Laid-Erection Delayed till 1$5-Henderson's Plan-William Mylne appointed Architect-Terms of the Contract-Fall of the
Bridge-Repired and Completed--The Upper and Lower Flesh-Markets-Old Post OffictAdam Black-Ann Street-The Ettrick
Shepherd and the .. Nocks"-The Bridge Widened . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 334
CHAPTER XLIII.
EAST SIDE OF THE NORTH BRIDGE.
Dingwall's Castle-Whitefield's " Preachings "-History of the Old Theatre Royal-The Building-David Ross's Management-Leased to
Mr. Foote-Then to Mr. Digges-Mr. Moss-Mrs. Yates-Next Leased to Mr. Jackson-The Siddons Ram-Reception of the Great
Actress-Mrs. Baddeley-New Patent-the playhouse Riot--"The Scottish Roscius"-A Ghost-Expiry of the Patent . . . 340
CHAPTER XLIV..
EAST SIDE OF THE NORTH BRIDGE (continued).
Old Theatre Royal-Management of Mr. Henry Siddons-Mr. Mumy-Miss O'Neill-Production of Rd Roy-Visit of George IV. to the
Theatre- Eoinburgh Theatrical Fund-Scott and his Novels-Retirement of Mr. Mumy-The Management of Mr. and ME.
Wyndham-The Closing Night of the Theatre . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 348
CHAPTER XLV.
EAST SIDE OF THE NORTH BRIDGE (codinwed).
Memorabilia of the General Post Office-First Postal Svstem in Scotland-First Communication with Irdand-Sanctions given by the Scottish
Parliament-Expenses of the Establkhment at various Periods-The Horse Posts-Violation of Letter Bags-Casualties of the Period-
The First Stage Coach-Peter Willison-The Various Post Ofice Buildings--The Waterloo Place Office-Royal Arms Removed-
New 06ce Built-Staffand F d Details . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .353
CHAPTER XLVI.
EAST SIDE OF THE NORTH BRIDGE (concluded).
The Old Orphan Hospital-It5 Foundation, Object, and Removal-Lady Glenorchy's Chapel-Her Disputes with the Presbytery-Dr. Snell
JonesDemolition of the Chapel and School-Old PhysiC Gardens Formed-The Gardens-& Andrew Balfour-James Suthe.-land-
. Inundatedin ~~Sutherland5EffortstoImprovetheGardens-ProfessorHope . . . . . . . . . . . 359 ... Vlll OLD' AND NEW EDINBURGH. CHAPTER XXXIX. , T H E W E S T B 0 W (conclud-d.) PAGE A Hand to Hand Combat in ...

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Stuart monarchs-a new era began in its history,
and it took a stahding as the chief burgh in
Scotland, the relations of which with England, for
generations after, partook rather of a vague prolonged
armistice in time of war than a settled
peace, and thus all rational progress was arrested
or paralysed, and was never likely to be otherwise
so long as the kings of England maintained the
insane pretensions of Edward I., deduced from
Brute the fabulous first king of Albion !
In 1383 Robert 11. was holding his court in
the Castle when he received there the ambassador
of Charles VI., on the 20th August, renewing the
ancient league with France. In the following year
a truce ended; the Earls of March and Douglas
began the war with spirit, and cut off a rich convoy
on its way to Roxburgh. This brought the Duke
of Lancaster and the Earl of Buckingham before
Edinburgh. Their army was almost innumerable
(according to Abercrombie, following Walsingham),
but the former spared the city in remembrance of
his hospitable treatment by the people when he was
among them, an exile from the English court-a
kindness for which the Scots cared so little that
they followed up his retreat so sharply, that he laid
the town and its great church in ashes when he returned
in the following year.
In 1390 Robert 111. ascended the throne, and ir.
that year we find the ambassadors of Charles VI.
again witnessing in the Castle the royal seal and signature
attached to the treaty for mutual aid and
defence against England in all time coming. This
brought Henry IV., as we have said, before the
Castle in 1400, with a well-appointed and numerous
army, in August.
From the fortress the young and gallant David
Duke of Rothesay sent a herald with a challenge
to meet him in mortal combat, where and when
he chose, with a hundred men of good blood on
each side, and determine the war in that way.
" But King Henry was in no humour to forego the
advantage he already possessed, at the head of a
more numerous army than Scotland could then
raise ; and so, contenting himself with a verbal
equivocation in reply to this knightly challenge, he
sat down with his numerous host before the Castle
till (with the usual consequences of the Scottish
reception of such'invaders) cold and rain, and -
twenty feet in length, with three or four large saws,
I for the common use, and six or more " cliekes of
castles, resorted to the simple expedient of driving
off all the cattle and sheep, provisions and goods,
even to the thatch of their houses, and leaving
nothing but bare walls for the enemy to wreak their
vengeance on; but they never put up their swords
till, by a terrible retaliating invasion into the more
fertile parts of England, they fully made up for
their losses. And this wretched state of affairs, for
nearly 500 years, lies at the door of the Plantagenet
and Tudor kings.
The aged King Robert 111. and his queen, the
once beautiful Annabella Drummond, resided in the
Castle and in the abbey of Holyrood alternately.
We are told that on one occasion, when the Duke
of Albany, with several of the courtiers, were conversing
one night on the ramparts of the former,
a singular light was seen afar off at the horizon, and
across the s t a q sky there flashea a bright meteor,
carrying behind it a long train of sparks.
'' Mark ye, sirs ! " said Albany, " yonder prodigy
portends either the ruin of a nation or the downfall
of some great prince ;a and an old chronicler omits
not to record that the Duke of Rothesay (who,
had he ascended the throne, would have been
David III.), perished soon after of famine, in the
hands of Ramornie, at Falkland.
Edinburgh was prosperous enough to be able to
contribute 50,000 merks towards the ransom of
James I., the gifted author of " The King's Quhair "
(or Book), who had been lawlessly captured at
sea in his boyhood by the English, and was left
in their hands for nineteen years a captive by his
designing uncle the Regent Albany ; and though
his plans for the pacification of the Highlands kept
him much in Perth, yet, in 1430, he was in
Edinburgh with Queen Jane and the Court, when
he received the surrender of Alexander Earl of
ROSS, who had been in rebellion but was defeated
by the royal troops in Lochaber.
As yet no Scottish noble had built a mansion in
Edinburgh, where a great number of the houses were
actually constructed of wood from the adjacent
forest, thatched with straw, and few were more than
two storeys in height ; but in the third Parliament
of James I., held at Perth in 1425, to avert the
conflagrations to which the Edinbiirghers were so
liable, laws were ordained requiring the magistrates
to have in readiness seven or eight ladders of
his progress or retreat."*
When unable to resist, the people of the entire
town and country, who were not secured in
* Wilson's ''Memorials." .
fired ;' and that no fire was to be conveyed from
one house to another within the town, unless in a
covered vessel or lantern. Another law forbade'
people on visits to live with their friends, but to ... monarchs-a new era began in its history, and it took a stahding as the chief burgh in Scotland, the ...

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*'Lauriston.l THE NEW ROYAL INFIRMARY. 359
aunt Elizabeth, ordered that on application for
taking children into his hospital, those of the name
of Davidsonshoulc! have a preference, as well as
those of Watson. In June, 1741, twelve boys were
admitted into it; in three years the number
amounted to thirty; and in 1779 that number was
doubled.
, Watson's Merchant Academy, as it was named
in 1870, underwent a great change in that year.
The governors of the four hospitals connected with
the Merchant Company, taking advantage of the
Endowed Institutions (Scotland) Act, applied for
and obtained provisional orders empowering them
to convert the foundation into day-schools, and
it was opened as one. The edifice was sold to
the Corporation of the Royal Infirmary, and the
building formerly occupied as the Merchant Maiden
Hospital was acquired for, and is now being used
as, George Watson's College School for boys.
The building was long conspicuous from several
points by its small spire, surmounted by a ship, the
emblem of commerce. Here, then, we now find
the new Royal Infirmary, one of the most extensive
edifices in the city, which was formally opened on
Wednesday, the 29th of October, 1879, the foundation
stone having been laid in October, 1870, by
H.R.H. the Prince of Wales.
The situation of the infirmary is alike excellent
and desirable, from its vicinity to the open pasture
of the Meadows and Links, the free breezes
from the hills, and to the new seat of university
medical teaching. The additions and improvements
at the old Royal Infirmary, and the conversion
of the old High School into a Surgical
Hospital, were still found unfitted for the increasing
wants of the Corporation as the city grew in extent
and population, as the demands of medical science
increased, and the conditions'. of hospital management
became more amplified and exacting ; and the
necessity for some reform in the old edifit'e in Infirmary
Street led to the proposal of the mmagers for
rebuilding the entire Nedical House. When those
contributors met to whom this bold scheme was submitted,
complaints were urged as to the wants of
the Surgical Hospital, and it was also referred to
the committee appointed to consider the whole
question,
The subscription list eventually showed a total of
&75,ooo, and a proposed extension of the old
buildings, by the removal of certain houses at the
South Bridge, was abandoned, when a new impetus
was given to the movement by the late Professor
James Syme, who had won a high reputation as a
lecturer and anatomist.
. His strictures on the 'state of the Surgical Hospital
led to a discussion on the wiser policy of rebuilding
the whole infirmary, coupled with a proposal,
which was first suggested in the columns of
the Scotsnran, that a site should be fbund for it, not
near the South Bridge, but in the open neighbourhood
of the Meadows. The Governors of Watsods
Hospital, acting as we have stated, readily parted
with the property there, and plans for the building
were prepared by the late David Bryce, R.S.A.,
and to his nephew and partner, Mr. John Bryce,
was entrusted the superintendence of their completion.
In carrying out his plans Mr. Bryce was guided
by the resilts of medical experience on what is
known now as the cottage or pavilion system, by
which a certain amount of isolation is procured, and
air is freely circulated among the various blocks or
portions of the whole edifice. '' When it is mentioned
that of an area of eleven and a half acresthe
original purchase of Watson's ground having
been supplemented by the acquisition of Wharton
Place-only three and a half are actually occupied
with stone and lime, and that well distributed in
long narrow ranges over the general surface, it will
be understood that this important advantage has
been fully turned to account. ' While the primary
purpose of the institution has been steadily kept in
view, due regard has been ha2 to its future usefulness
as a means of medical and surgical education."
Most picturesque is this npw grand and striking
edifice from every point of view, by the great number
and wonderful repetition of its circular towers,
modelled after those of the Palaces of Falkland and
Holyrood, while the style of the whole is the old
Scottish baronial of the days of James V., the most
characteristic details and features of which are
completely reproduced in the main frontage, which
faces the north, or street of Lauriston.
The fagade here presents a central elevation IOO
feet in length, three storeys in height, with a sunk
basement. A prominent feature here is a tower,
buttressed at its angles, and corbelled from the
general line of the block, having its base opened by
the main entrance, with a window on either side to
light the hall.
The tower rises clear of the wall-head in a square
form, with round corbelled Scottish turrets at the
corners, one of them containing a stair, and over all
there is an octagonal slated spire, terminating in a
vane, at the height of 134 feet from the ground.
On the east and west rise stacks of ornamental
chimneys. The elevations on each side of this
tower are uniform, with turrets at each corner, and
three rows of windows, the upper gableted above
the line of the eaving-slates. ... THE NEW ROYAL INFIRMARY. 359 aunt Elizabeth, ordered that on application for taking children into ...

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GENERAL INDEX. 371
Black Watch, 11. 89, 138, 149, 179.
Black Wigs ClLb, 111. 123
Blackwood, Hnilie, 111. 15
Blackwood, William, I. 157, 291,
11. 139, 141, 142 ; the saloon in
his establinhment, 11. * 141 ; his
rrsidence, 111. 50
BfacA-wood's Mapasiw, 1. 339, 11.
322, 111. 195 288
23; ;Fa# ;2; ;7;g; 1.g WirZtors
11.140 IIP. 74
Blair,' Sir Jdmes Hunter, Lord
Provost, I. 179, 373, 376, 11. 283,
111. 89
Blair of Avontoun. Lord President.
236, 2 , II:27, 29, 120, 161, 271,
Blair Street, I. 245, 376, 11. 231,
Blarquhan Laird of 111. 36
BIair's Cl&, I. 65. & 11. 329 ;the
Duke of Gordon's house, 1. *p
Blairs of Balthayock, Tom-house
ofthe 11. 139
Blanc, kippolyte J., architect, 111.
38
Bland, the comedian, I. 342, 343
Blaw Wearie 111. 305
Bkis-sifwr, ?he gratuity, 11. 290,
383, 119. 45, 1 3 6 ~ 2 ~
Zj8,III. I
291
Blew Stone The I. 79
Blind Schdl, Cdigmillar, 11. 336
Blockhouse of St. Anthony. Leith.
111. 222, "23
J'Blue Blanket," The, I. 34, '36,
43, 11. 262, 278, 111. 55
Blumenreich, Herr, 111.88
Blyth's Close, 1. ga, 111. 66
Bmk's Land, West Port, I. 224
Boar Club The 111. IW
Board of Manuiactnres, 11. 8 3 4 6 ,
Body-snatchers Early 11. 1.w
B o ~ l l y , R o d n ci& near, 111.
Bo%l?yTower 111. 326 "328
Bonham, Sir Galter. II.'57
Bonkel Sir Edward I. 304
Bonnet'birds' club', 111.123
Bonnet-makers The 11. 265
Bonnington, n&r Le'ith, 11.~5,III.
W. ,306 ; view in, 111. * 96
Bonntngton House, 111. 88, 91,
*93, 147
Bonnington Mill, 111. 90, 247
Bonniugton Road, l I I . 8 8 , 1 2 8 , 1 ~ ,
Bonnington Sugar-refining Com-
Bonnyhaugh 111.90 gr
Bordeaux, &c de,Hr Holyrood,
Boreland homas the pcssessor of
the k&g$ stable, 11. 225; his
house I. * 80 1I.a25,n6
Bore-s&e or hare-stone, The, I.
326, 111. 28
Bomwlaski, ;he '8o?i;h dwarf, 11.
166.167
Borthwick, Lord, I. 40, 262, 11.383,
Borthwick, Jam- 11. 383
Borthwick's Close, I. 190, 211, 242
BosweIl, Sir Alexander, 1.173.182,
88, 92, 186
'7'1 '84
pany, Leith, 111. 91. 236
11. 78, 7%
Ill. 348
2x39 243.258
101, 18% 299911. 66, 143 255 339
ifs9 ; Lord hlacaulay s :pinion 01
his father and mother, 'jq; o n.wn's visit to Edinburgh,
I. z 9, IIL.57, 291, 35a
Bormll Raj, Wardte, Ill. 308
Boswell's Court, I.
Botanical gardenq, %e, I. 362,363,
Bothwell, Earfs of,' I. 94 122, 168,
Bo=vell, Jam=, I. 6 8 3 , 97, 98, 99,
111. 159, 161 162 163
196, 106, m7, 209, 2 1 0 ~ 2 4 ~ ~ 258,
259, 266, 276, 298, 3741 11. 61, 71,
72 111. 3 6,7, 52, 6 1 , ~ ~ 174,
33; ; Lord fi arnlefs murder 111.
3-7 * marruge of Queen kary
to the Earl of, I. 219. 11. 71,
262; how Bothwell attracted the
Queen's notice, 11. 102
Rothwell, Adam, Bishop of Orkney,
I. 116, q, 11. 48, 49, 71,
181, 111. 35, 98
Bothwell, ohn Lord, 11. 49
Hothwell, Air Francis, 111. 35
Hothwell, ohn I 47 158
Hothwell AichArd, PAvost of Kirk-
Bothwell of Glencorse, Henry, I. pa
Bothwell Bridge, 11. 39, 87. 375
Bottle House Company, Leith, 111.
Bough, Samuel, the artist, 11. 86,
Boulder, Gigantic, 11. 312
Bourse, The, Leith, 111. 231; its
other names, ib.
Bower, the historian of Edinburgh
University, 111. 8, 9. 10. 11, 16,
of-Fielh, 111. 2
239
Ill. 68
. .
18 19, 308
BokFoot, The, 11. 13'
Rowfoot Well. I. 310 11. 233
Bowles, Caroline, 11.'-
Boyd, Lord, 111. 174, 180
Boyd Sir Thomas nmtewn, Lord
Bo d, J o k , Slaubhter of'the ruf-
PrdVOSt 11. 284 i11.88 288
Ln. 11. a
4 4 $1, 4 ,'326, a;i, 347, fi.- . "Braid dugh Somewilk of the
Writes " 1. 315, 16
Braid, L i r d of, IIt. 49
Braid The river 111. 143, 322
Braid'Village o< 111. to, 113 ;ex*
c d o n near, 1iI. 40; its historical
asxiations, 111. 41
Braid's Row 111. 75
Braidsbum, 'I. 326, 111. 49, 61, 327
Brand, Sir Alexander, I. m3, 378,
Brandof Baberton, Alexander, 111.
Brandfield P h 11.218
Brandfield Stree; 11. ar
Braxfield, Lord, i, 173, 11. 152,153,
Bread. Sale of. determined bv law.
11.21
334
339 . . 11.;80 '
Brea&lbe Earlof 1.378 I11 146
Breadalbani Marqkis of,'II.'86;
Breadalbme Stdet. Leith. 111. ax.
Marchion& of 11. zog
. . _ _ 236
II.84,111.2 9
Breakwater,TheNewhaven III.303
Bremner, David, 1. 283, 384,
Brewers, The &inburgh, 11. 68
Brewster, Sir David, 1.379,II. 140,
f57,III. q, 242: statueof 111.24
Brilxs, Acceptance of, by'judgea
and others, 1. 163, 164, 167,169
Brickfield, 111. 144
Bridewell, The, 11. 106, IT
Bridge-end, 111. 58
Bridges, Sir Egerton, I. 273
Bridges David, cloth merchnot,
Bright, John, M.P., 11. 284
Brighton Chapel, 11. 326
Brighton Place, Portobello 111.148
Hrlsbane, Sir T., Father d 11. 199
Bristo, 11. 135, 267, w, Ilt. 94
Bristo Park 11. 326
Bristo Port,'I. 38, 11. 234, 267, 316,
T3t.3249 325, 3 4 '32% 3Pp 379,
Brisro Street, I. 335, 11. 326.327,
I. I ~ ' - I I O ; his wife, I. 110
11. 94, 156
British Convention, The, 11. 236 ;
British Linen Company, I. a79.280,
11s governors and patrons, 1. 279
British Linen Co.'s Bank, Edinburgh
11 170 171, 172; at
Leith'III'z38 '23
British h e ; Hail, &nongate, 11.
31, 33, 83
xilure of its members, id.
355, 11. 33, 93, '731 '74, 111.344;
Broadstairs House, Causewayside,
Broad Wknd, Leith, 111. 167, 210,
111. 50 "52
236,238
Brodie, Deacon, Robberies cammitted
by, I. 1 1 s r 1 5 * 116. 217,
11.23, Ill. 3t7: lantein and keys
used by I. 115 : execution of,
1. 1x5 ; herview between Bmdie
and Smith, 1. * 117; his method
of robbery 11. 23
Brodie William the sculptor, I. 159,
Brodie s klos; 1.112
Brwke, Gnsdvus V., the actor, I.
357
Brwm Stock of, I. 377
Bmugham, Lord, I. 166, 379, 11.
i11 113 157 I 287, 292.347,
111: y :his b k a a c e , I. 168; his
mother, I. 168, 242 ; burial-place
nfhisfathcr,lII. 131 ; his statue,
1. I59
Bmughton, 1.335,II.3,191,III. 151
Broughton, Barony of, 11. I&
185, 186, 366,111. 83 86 I
Bmughton Hum in 1850, 184
Broughton Hall, Ill. 88, * 93
Broughton Loan, 11. E+ 115, 176,
Broughton Park, 111. 88
Broughton Place, 11. 183, 184
Broughton Street, 11. 178, 179, 183,
11. ;30 155 ill. 68,101
I&, 186, 188
184
Broughtan T o l b t h , The, 11. * 181
Broughton loll, 111. 95
Bronnga, John, the Nevhaven
Brown CaGt. Sir ?&uel, 111. 303
Brown: George, the builder, 11. 2%
B m . Thomas. architect. 11. IOI
hsherman 111. 5 p 6
~ m m ; Rev. Alexander, irr. 75-
Brown, Rev. Dr., 111. 51
Brown Square, 1. g1.11.260,268,
269, 274 =71r 339
Broww, Dr. James, I. 190, 339,II.
1 4 314, 111. 79
Browne Dr. Thomas, 11.395
Browndll, Williim, the naval adventurer,
I I I . I ~ ,
Rrownhill, the builder, 1. 98
Brown's Chapel (Or. John), Rose
Street, 11. 15 , 184
Brown's close 1. 8: p
Brown's taveA, Lkkgate Leith
111. 914 ; singular tragedy in, ib:
Browns of Greenbank, The, I. go
Hruce Lord 11. 354
Bruce: Sir hiichael 11. 168
BNC~ of Balcaskd and Kinross,
Sir William architect of Holyrood
Palace'l. 336 11. 74, 367
Bruce. Robe;. Lord Kennrtt. 11.
242
Rruce, Robert, sword of, 111. 355
Hruce Lady 111. 158
nruce'of RiAng's mansion, I. 2-4
Bruce of Kinnaird, the traveller, 1.
247, 111,162
Brucr of Kinloss, Lady, 11. 257
Rruce of Powfoulis Mrs 11. 16a
Bruce Michael, th: Sco;;ish Kirke
White, 111. 219
B ~ c e ' s Close, I. 223
Brunstane, 11. 34
Hrunstane Rum 111. 149
Brunstane, Laid of, 111. 150
Brunstane manor-house, 111. 149,
1509 Tl579.366
Brunsmck btmt, 111. 81
Hruntan Dr. I. 79 111. 83
Brunton'Pla& 191.
Bruntsfield Links, 11. 115,137, 222,
313, 348, 111. q~ 34 31, 33, 43 ;
the avenue 111. '33
Bruntsfield dr Warrender House,
Bryce, David, thearchitect, 11. 95,
97, 154 174 210, 359, 111. 82
Rryce John architect 11. 359
Brysoh Rodert 1.37;
Yuccle;ch, D&s of, 11. 21, 86,
211, 9 3 , 318, 358, 111. 198, 2x9,
d37 265, 270, F, 30% 311, 3r4 ;
Duchessof 11.115
Bucckuch, Hemy Duke of, 11. 310
Buccleuch Lady of 1. z06
Buccleuch'Free ChArch, 11. 346
Buccleuch Place, 11. 148, a68, 347,
Bucckoch Street, II. 339
111. 45,46, *48,
Ill. '25
Buchan, Earl of, 1. 34, 11. 8 6 , s ~
1% 2% 339, 111. 2s 123, 1%
180, 314
Buchanaii, George, I. 16, 143, 167,
206, ~ 5 . *4, 11. 67. 127. 363
111. 14 179, 19. -1, 998,363.
memorial window in new Greyfriars
Church, 11. 379
Bnchanan, lk. k'raocis, botanist,
111. 1-52
Buchanan of Auchintorlie, 11.159
Buchanan Street, 111. 15
Buckingham Tenace, 119. 67
Bnckstane The 111. 342
Buildings 'in Edinburgh, Ancient
laws regulating the I. rl
Bull, Capture of Sir 'Stephen, 111.
Bullock, William ; his plan for the
re-capture of Edinburgh Castle,
202
I. 25, 26.
Bunker's Hill, I. $6
Burdiehoux, 111. 342; fossil dLcoveries
near, id. .
Burdiehouse Burn 111. 322, 339
Burgess Close, Leith, 111.164 167.
Burgh Loch,The, 11. zgc, 346, 347,
Burg Loch Brewery, 11.349
Burphmuir. The. 1. U. ~ O A . ?I&
227, 232, 234, 249
* q 9 , 354
33r 326, >a3, iiL;;
35 170 342; muster of troops
udder jam- 111. and James IV.,
Ill. 28. the k - s c a n e , 111.~8,
* z g ; :dud in 17za, 111. p;
Valleyfield House and Leven
Ledge, id.; Barclay Freechurch,
76.; Hruntsfield Links and the
Golf clubs, ib. ; Gillespie's Hospital,
111. & *37: M e r c h w
Castle, ILI. 9% P**r 26
Burghmuir, Dlstrict of the, 111. q
-y ; battle of the (see Battles)
Burghmuir-head mad, 111. 38; thc
Free Church, i6.
Burial-ground, The first, in =inburgh,
I. 149
Burials under church porticoes, 11.
247
Burke and Hare, the murderers L
Im, 11. 226-230, Ill. 27
Burleigh Lord 1.127 ; escape from
the l.oiboot$ ib.
Burn, Willkm the architect, 11.
171, 111. 34 b8 85 255
Burnet, Jamei oith: TownGuud.
11.311
Burnet, Sir Thomas, 11. 147
Burnet of Monboddo, Miss, I. iq.
111.42
Burney, Dr the musician 11. zg
Burning of'ihe Pope in ;figy by
the Universitystudents, 111. II-
13. 57
Burns, Robert, I. 3,106, 107, 11g.
IW 154 171, 178, 17% 232,236.
I Y, 159, 187, 188, wl 27, 333
2397 348, 366, 11. p4 27. 307 3%
191. 42, 55, 161, 352 ; Ftxman s
statne of, 11.88, 110; Nasmyth's
y t r a i t of, 11. @ ; monument of,
1. 11% *IIZ; bust by Brodi,
11. 110: head Or, 11. 127
Bums' centenary The first 11.150
Burns, Colonel W. Nicol, &e poet's
son 11. Sg
Burn:, Miss, and Bailie Crcech, II. '
Bnrniisland, I. 58,111.180, 188,191,
158, 159
211,314
Burtou, Ur. John Hill, I. 98, 111.
42, 43; his literary work.. 111.
'
43
able article, 11. 219
86,111. 13:
Butcher meat formerly an unsale-
Bute, Earl of, 1. 164, 179, 272, 11.
Bute, Marquis of, 11. 346
Bute's Battery, 1. 78
Butler, John, the king's carpenter,
Butter Tron, The, I. 50,
thtters of F'itlochry, %'Le, 11.
11. 136
5 218
143
Byres, Sir John, I. 153, 219, 11-GENERAL INDEX. 371
Black Watch, 11. 89, 138, 149, 179.
Black Wigs ClLb, 111. 123
Blackwood, Hnilie, 111. 15
Blackwood, William, I. 157, 291,
11. 139, 141, 142 ; the saloon in
his establinhment, 11. * 141 ; his
rrsidence, 111. 50
BfacA-wood's Mapasiw, 1. 339, 11.
322, 111. 195 288
23; ;Fa# ;2; ;7;g; 1.g WirZtors
11.140 IIP. 74
Blair,' Sir Jdmes Hunter, Lord
Provost, I. 179, 373, 376, 11. 283,
111. 89
Blair of Avontoun. Lord President.
236, 2 , II:27, 29, 120, 161, 271,
Blair Street, I. 245, 376, 11. 231,
Blarquhan Laird of 111. 36
BIair's Cl&, I. 65. & 11. 329 ;the
Duke of Gordon's house, 1. *p
Blairs of Balthayock, Tom-house
ofthe 11. 139
Blanc, kippolyte J., architect, 111.
38
Bland, the comedian, I. 342, 343
Blaw Wearie 111. 305
Bkis-sifwr, ?he gratuity, 11. 290,
383, 119. 45, 1 3 6 ~ 2 ~
Zj8,III. I
291
Blew Stone The I. 79
Blind Schdl, Cdigmillar, 11. 336
Blockhouse of St. Anthony. Leith.
111. 222, "23
J'Blue Blanket," The, I. 34, '36,
43, 11. 262, 278, 111. 55
Blumenreich, Herr, 111.88
Blyth's Close, 1. ga, 111. 66
Bmk's Land, West Port, I. 224
Boar Club The 111. IW
Board of Manuiactnres, 11. 8 3 4 6 ,
Body-snatchers Early 11. 1.w
B o ~ l l y , R o d n ci& near, 111.
Bo%l?yTower 111. 326 "328
Bonham, Sir Galter. II.'57
Bonkel Sir Edward I. 304
Bonnet'birds' club', 111.123
Bonnet-makers The 11. 265
Bonnington, n&r Le'ith, 11.~5,III.
W. ,306 ; view in, 111. * 96
Bonntngton House, 111. 88, 91,
*93, 147
Bonnington Mill, 111. 90, 247
Bonniugton Road, l I I . 8 8 , 1 2 8 , 1 ~ ,
Bonnington Sugar-refining Com-
Bonnyhaugh 111.90 gr
Bordeaux, &c de,Hr Holyrood,
Boreland homas the pcssessor of
the k&g$ stable, 11. 225; his
house I. * 80 1I.a25,n6
Bore-s&e or hare-stone, The, I.
326, 111. 28
Bomwlaski, ;he '8o?i;h dwarf, 11.
166.167
Borthwick, Lord, I. 40, 262, 11.383,
Borthwick, Jam- 11. 383
Borthwick's Close, I. 190, 211, 242
BosweIl, Sir Alexander, 1.173.182,
88, 92, 186
'7'1 '84
pany, Leith, 111. 91. 236
11. 78, 7%
Ill. 348
2x39 243.258
101, 18% 299911. 66, 143 255 339
ifs9 ; Lord hlacaulay s :pinion 01
his father and mother, 'jq; o n.wn's visit to Edinburgh,
I. z 9, IIL.57, 291, 35a
Bormll Raj, Wardte, Ill. 308
Boswell's Court, I.
Botanical gardenq, %e, I. 362,363,
Bothwell, Earfs of,' I. 94 122, 168,
Bo=vell, Jam=, I. 6 8 3 , 97, 98, 99,
111. 159, 161 162 163
196, 106, m7, 209, 2 1 0 ~ 2 4 ~ ~ 258,
259, 266, 276, 298, 3741 11. 61, 71,
72 111. 3 6,7, 52, 6 1 , ~ ~ 174,
33; ; Lord fi arnlefs murder 111.
3-7 * marruge of Queen kary
to the Earl of, I. 219. 11. 71,
262; how Bothwell attracted the
Queen's notice, 11. 102
Rothwell, Adam, Bishop of Orkney,
I. 116, q, 11. 48, 49, 71,
181, 111. 35, 98
Bothwell, ohn Lord, 11. 49
Hothwell, Air Francis, 111. 35
Hothwell, ohn I 47 158
Hothwell AichArd, PAvost of Kirk-
Bothwell of Glencorse, Henry, I. pa
Bothwell Bridge, 11. 39, 87. 375
Bottle House Company, Leith, 111.
Bough, Samuel, the artist, 11. 86,
Boulder, Gigantic, 11. 312
Bourse, The, Leith, 111. 231; its
other names, ib.
Bower, the historian of Edinburgh
University, 111. 8, 9. 10. 11, 16,
of-Fielh, 111. 2
239
Ill. 68
. .
18 19, 308
BokFoot, The, 11. 13'
Rowfoot Well. I. 310 11. 233
Bowles, Caroline, 11.'-
Boyd, Lord, 111. 174, 180
Boyd Sir Thomas nmtewn, Lord
Bo d, J o k , Slaubhter of'the ruf-
PrdVOSt 11. 284 i11.88 288
Ln. 11. a
4 4 $1, 4 ,'326, a;i, 347, fi.- . "Braid dugh Somewilk of the
Writes " 1. 315, 16
Braid, L i r d of, IIt. 49
Braid The river 111. 143, 322
Braid'Village o< 111. to, 113 ;ex*
c d o n near, 1iI. 40; its historical
asxiations, 111. 41
Braid's Row 111. 75
Braidsbum, 'I. 326, 111. 49, 61, 327
Brand, Sir Alexander, I. m3, 378,
Brandof Baberton, Alexander, 111.
Brandfield P h 11.218
Brandfield Stree; 11. ar
Braxfield, Lord, i, 173, 11. 152,153,
Bread. Sale of. determined bv law.
11.21
334
339 . . 11.;80 '
Brea&lbe Earlof 1.378 I11 146
Breadalbani Marqkis of,'II.'86;
Breadalbme Stdet. Leith. 111. ax.
Marchion& of 11. zog
. . _ _ 236
II.84,111.2 9
Breakwater,TheNewhaven III.303
Bremner, David, 1. 283, 384,
Brewers, The &inburgh, 11. 68
Brewster, Sir David, 1.379,II. 140,
f57,III. q, 242: statueof 111.24
Brilxs, Acceptance of, by'judgea
and others, 1. 163, 164, 167,169
Brickfield, 111. 144
Bridewell, The, 11. 106, IT
Bridge-end, 111. 58
Bridges, Sir Egerton, I. 273
Bridges David, cloth merchnot,
Bright, John, M.P., 11. 284
Brighton Chapel, 11. 326
Brighton Place, Portobello 111.148
Hrlsbane, Sir T., Father d 11. 199
Bristo, 11. 135, 267, w, Ilt. 94
Bristo Park 11. 326
Bristo Port,'I. 38, 11. 234, 267, 316,
T3t.3249 325, 3 4 '32% 3Pp 379,
Brisro Street, I. 335, 11. 326.327,
I. I ~ ' - I I O ; his wife, I. 110
11. 94, 156
British Convention, The, 11. 236 ;
British Linen Company, I. a79.280,
11s governors and patrons, 1. 279
British Linen Co.'s Bank, Edinburgh
11 170 171, 172; at
Leith'III'z38 '23
British h e ; Hail, &nongate, 11.
31, 33, 83
xilure of its members, id.
355, 11. 33, 93, '731 '74, 111.344;
Broadstairs House, Causewayside,
Broad Wknd, Leith, 111. 167, 210,
111. 50 "52
236,238
Brodie, Deacon, Robberies cammitted
by, I. 1 1 s r 1 5 * 116. 217,
11.23, Ill. 3t7: lantein and keys
used by I. 115 : execution of,
1. 1x5 ; herview between Bmdie
and Smith, 1. * 117; his method
of robbery 11. 23
Brodie William the sculptor, I. 159,
Brodie s klos; 1.112
Brwke, Gnsdvus V., the actor, I.
357
Brwm Stock of, I. 377
Bmugham, Lord, I. 166, 379, 11.
i11 113 157 I 287, 292.347,
111: y :his b k a a c e , I. 168; his
mother, I. 168, 242 ; burial-place
nfhisfathcr,lII. 131 ; his statue,
1. I59
Bmughton, 1.335,II.3,191,III. 151
Broughton, Barony of, 11. I&
185, 186, 366,111. 83 86 I
Bmughton Hum in 1850, 184
Broughton Hall, Ill. 88, * 93
Broughton Loan, 11. E+ 115, 176,
Broughton Park, 111. 88
Broughton Place, 11. 183, 184
Broughton Street, 11. 178, 179, 183,
11. ;30 155 ill. 68,101
I&, 186, 188
184
Broughtan T o l b t h , The, 11. * 181
Broughton loll, 111. 95
Bronnga, John, the Nevhaven
Brown CaGt. Sir ?&uel, 111. 303
Brown: George, the builder, 11. 2%
B m . Thomas. architect. 11. IOI
hsherman 111. 5 p 6
~ m m ; Rev. Alexander, irr. 75-
Brown, Rev. Dr., 111. 51
Brown Square, 1. g1.11.260,268,
269, 274 =71r 339
Broww, Dr. James, I. 190, 339,II.
1 4 314, 111. 79
Browne Dr. Thomas, 11.395
Browndll, Williim, the naval adventurer,
I I I . I ~ ,
Rrownhill, the builder, 1. 98
Brown's Chapel (Or. John), Rose
Street, 11. 15 , 184
Brown's close 1. 8: p
Brown's taveA, Lkkgate Leith
111. 914 ; singular tragedy in, ib:
Browns of Greenbank, The, I. go
Hruce Lord 11. 354
Bruce: Sir hiichael 11. 168
BNC~ of Balcaskd and Kinross,
Sir William architect of Holyrood
Palace'l. 336 11. 74, 367
Bruce. Robe;. Lord Kennrtt. 11.
242
Rruce, Robert, sword of, 111. 355
Hruce Lady 111. 158
nruce'of RiAng's mansion, I. 2-4
Bruce of Kinnaird, the traveller, 1.
247, 111,162
Brucr of Kinloss, Lady, 11. 257
Rruce of Powfoulis Mrs 11. 16a
Bruce Michael, th: Sco;;ish Kirke
White, 111. 219
B ~ c e ' s Close, I. 223
Brunstane, 11. 34
Hrunstane Rum 111. 149
Brunstane, Laid of, 111. 150
Brunstane manor-house, 111. 149,
1509 Tl579.366
Brunsmck btmt, 111. 81
Hruntan Dr. I. 79 111. 83
Brunton'Pla& 191.
Bruntsfield Links, 11. 115,137, 222,
313, 348, 111. q~ 34 31, 33, 43 ;
the avenue 111. '33
Bruntsfield dr Warrender House,
Bryce, David, thearchitect, 11. 95,
97, 154 174 210, 359, 111. 82
Rryce John architect 11. 359
Brysoh Rodert 1.37;
Yuccle;ch, D&s of, 11. 21, 86,
211, 9 3 , 318, 358, 111. 198, 2x9,
d37 265, 270, F, 30% 311, 3r4 ;
Duchessof 11.115
Bucckuch, Hemy Duke of, 11. 310
Buccleuch Lady of 1. z06
Buccleuch'Free ChArch, 11. 346
Buccleuch Place, 11. 148, a68, 347,
Bucckoch Street, II. 339
111. 45,46, *48,
Ill. '25
Buchan, Earl of, 1. 34, 11. 8 6 , s ~
1% 2% 339, 111. 2s 123, 1%
180, 314
Buchanaii, George, I. 16, 143, 167,
206, ~ 5 . *4, 11. 67. 127. 363
111. 14 179, 19. -1, 998,363.
memorial window in new Greyfriars
Church, 11. 379
Bnchanan, lk. k'raocis, botanist,
111. 1-52
Buchanan of Auchintorlie, 11.159
Buchanan Street, 111. 15
Buckingham Tenace, 119. 67
Bnckstane The 111. 342
Buildings 'in Edinburgh, Ancient
laws regulating the I. rl
Bull, Capture of Sir 'Stephen, 111.
Bullock, William ; his plan for the
re-capture of Edinburgh Castle,
202
I. 25, 26.
Bunker's Hill, I. $6
Burdiehoux, 111. 342; fossil dLcoveries
near, id. .
Burdiehouse Burn 111. 322, 339
Burgess Close, Leith, 111.164 167.
Burgh Loch,The, 11. zgc, 346, 347,
Burg Loch Brewery, 11.349
Burphmuir. The. 1. U. ~ O A . ?I&
227, 232, 234, 249
* q 9 , 354
33r 326, >a3, iiL;;
35 170 342; muster of troops
udder jam- 111. and James IV.,
Ill. 28. the k - s c a n e , 111.~8,
* z g ; :dud in 17za, 111. p;
Valleyfield House and Leven
Ledge, id.; Barclay Freechurch,
76.; Hruntsfield Links and the
Golf clubs, ib. ; Gillespie's Hospital,
111. & *37: M e r c h w
Castle, ILI. 9% P**r 26
Burghmuir, Dlstrict of the, 111. q
-y ; battle of the (see Battles)
Burghmuir-head mad, 111. 38; thc
Free Church, i6.
Burial-ground, The first, in =inburgh,
I. 149
Burials under church porticoes, 11.
247
Burke and Hare, the murderers L
Im, 11. 226-230, Ill. 27
Burleigh Lord 1.127 ; escape from
the l.oiboot$ ib.
Burn, Willkm the architect, 11.
171, 111. 34 b8 85 255
Burnet, Jamei oith: TownGuud.
11.311
Burnet, Sir Thomas, 11. 147
Burnet of Monboddo, Miss, I. iq.
111.42
Burney, Dr the musician 11. zg
Burning of'ihe Pope in ;figy by
the Universitystudents, 111. II-
13. 57
Burns, Robert, I. 3,106, 107, 11g.
IW 154 171, 178, 17% 232,236.
I Y, 159, 187, 188, wl 27, 333
2397 348, 366, 11. p4 27. 307 3%
191. 42, 55, 161, 352 ; Ftxman s
statne of, 11.88, 110; Nasmyth's
y t r a i t of, 11. @ ; monument of,
1. 11% *IIZ; bust by Brodi,
11. 110: head Or, 11. 127
Bums' centenary The first 11.150
Burns, Colonel W. Nicol, &e poet's
son 11. Sg
Burn:, Miss, and Bailie Crcech, II. '
Bnrniisland, I. 58,111.180, 188,191,
158, 159
211,314
Burtou, Ur. John Hill, I. 98, 111.
42, 43; his literary work.. 111.
'
43
able article, 11. 219
86,111. 13:
Butcher meat formerly an unsale-
Bute, Earl of, 1. 164, 179, 272, 11.
Bute, Marquis of, 11. 346
Bute's Battery, 1. 78
Butler, John, the king's carpenter,
Butter Tron, The, I. 50,
thtters of F'itlochry, %'Le, 11.
11. 136
5 218
143
Byres, Sir John, I. 153, 219, 11- ... INDEX. 371 Black Watch, 11. 89, 138, 149, 179. Black Wigs ClLb, 111. 123 Blackwood, Hnilie, 111. ...

Vol. 6  p. 371 (Rel. 0.21)

......

Vol. 6  p. 369 (Rel. 0.16)

386 OLD AND NEW' EDINBURGH.
'Plague in Leith, The 111. 180,186
Plainstane's close ~ i . 235
Playfair, Dr. Lyo;, 111. 24
Playfair, Professor, 1. 339, 11.106,
1% 1p,z70' monument to,II.rro
Playfaii, W. H., architect, I. 379,
11. 83 88, 97, 106, 110, 2x41 335,
111. ;3, 68, 83
Playhouse Close 11. 23
Pleasance, he, i. 38, 253,278,295.
298, 335, 382-384, 11. 3, 218 135,
240, 301, 3247 330, 337, 3383 345,
111.54 ; origin of thename, I. 382
Plewlands, The, 111. 42
Pocketsleve 111.92
PokerCluh ?he, I . ~ O , Z ~ T , I I I . I ~ ~
Police of Ehinburgh, 11. 120
Police Office, I. 242
Political unions. Illegality of the, . - -
11. 236, 237
Pollok. Robert. 11. ICO
Polton Lord iII. 3;6
PolwAh d d y 11. aog
Pont, dkrt, dinister of St. Cuthbert's
Church 11. 131 I 2
Pont, Robert, hrovost 'o?Trinity
Pontheus, John, the quack doctor,
Poole's Coffee-house, 11. xza
Popular songs of 1745, I. 325
Port Hopetoun, 11.~15~226 ; Edinbur
h Castle from, 11. *a16
Port .ft. Nicholas, 111. 171
Portmus Captain I. 130 111.262
263 ; hHnged b;the mdb, I. 130:
College, 1.305, 307
I. zoo, 201
~. z3i, 11. 2 I, 232
Porteous john, herald painter,
111.4:
Porreou~ riots I. 4 123, 128-1 I
178, 218, 3:g; h n t i n g ~f t2:
111. III .___ ._
Portland, Henrietta Duchess of,
Portland,'Duke of, 111.42
Portland Place 11. zza
Portobello, I. h3, 111. 138, 143-
154165; Romanroadnear I. 10,
fro; view of Portobed, III.
:IN, *152, *r53: plan of, 111. . 147: churchesandchawls. 111.
II.rg1 111.42
- .
147; * 153
Portobello Hut. 111. IM
Portobello review lhe' '111. 146
Portobello Koad '111. ;38
Portobello Sand; 111.145, Plate p
Rortsburgh CO& House, 11. *=I. -
2=4
Porbburgh, The Eastern, I. 3 8 , k
l p , I I . 222 224 226 227,22gr 334
33s ; anciehtly H htirgh, 11. 103
Post Office, The old, I. 274 338,
*356; the new I. 340, 351, 353,
*357,358.364; ;he Scottishpostal
system, I. 353- 58 : itsexpenses
at various periJs, I. 355,356; its
posf-ten 1.354,355,39; the
vanous po&office buildings, I.
358
Post Office Close, I. 358
Potato, The introducer of the, 11. p
Potterrow, The, 1. p, 335,II. 135,
231, =4=r 274. 327, 330, 33% 332,
Potterrow ort, 11. 257, 334 331,
111.3
Poulterer The King's 111.66
Poultry AndS. Dean,'III. 65, 66
Poultry Market The old I. 373
Powburn, The ' 11. 267 ' 111. 29
I 58; its otier names:
Powburn House 111. 51
Powderhall III:88 8g *g3
Powrie, di1liaq 'ac<ornplice ot
Bothwell in the murder of Darnley,
1. 263, 276, 111. 4, 6
Prayer, An ambiguous, 11. 133
Preaching Friar's Vennel, The, I.
Preaching Window," Knox'r
house, I. 214
3331 3 3 4 , p 345, 111. 51
81.:; '
'( p7,258
Pre-historic Edinburgh, I. 9-14
Prendergast's revenqe, 11. 52, 53
.Prentice, Henry, the introducer 01
Presbyterian Church, Re-establish.
.Preston, John, Lord Fentonbams,
the potato, 11. 30
ment of the, 11.246
-1.206 -
Preston, Sir Michael, I. q
&ton of Craigmillar Provost Sir
?reston of Craignillar. Sir Richard.
Henry, 11. 242, 278,'III. 61
111.61
?reston of Craigmillar, Provost Sir
Simon, I. w, 305, 11.279.111.
58, 59, 61, 62, 107
'reston of Valleyfield, Sir Charles,
11. 26, 335
326, 330. ,331: 332.
?reston, Lieut.-General, I. 322,323.
?redon relic, bt. Giles's Cathedral,
I. 140
?restonAeld manor-house, 111. *56,
57, 58
?restongrange, Lord, 11.242, 272,
111.10
?restonpans, 11. 283 16,.340, 111.
IM, 174, a63; the' ishermen of,
111. 300 ; battle of (see Battles)
?reston Street, 111. 50
?retender, Defence of the, 111.194
?rice, Sir Magnus, 1. 117
?nestfield or Prestonfield, I. 3 2 6 3 .
Primrose, Viscount, I. m3,II. 124;
Primrose, Si Archibald, I. 91,111.
?rimrose Lady Dorothea, I. 257
Primus 'khe title 11. 246
Prince 'Anne of benmarks Dragoons
I. 64
Prince kharley's house, Duddmgston
11. *317
Princ;Consort, The, I. 358,II. 79;
memorial to, 11. 175, '77, a84
PrinceofWales, Marrageof, 11.284
Prince of Wales's Graving Dock,
Leith, 111. 286, q8g
358, 3647372r 11- 93, 95, 99s 100,
14, 1x0, 114, 117, 118, 119-130,
176, 182, 191 no6, zog, ?XI, 213,
372, 383,111.'146, 295 ; view from
Scott'smonument, 11.*124: view
looking west, 11. * '25
hinale, Andrew Lord Haining, I.
315, III.5p
Viscountess, I. 104
I06
Princes Street, I.39,a55,295, 339.
131,136, 139, 151, 163, 165, 175,
27;
Pringle, Sir Walter, I. 1%
Pringle, Thomas 11. 140
Pringle of Stichel, Colonel, 111.45;
Printed, Number of, in Edinburgh
Printing-press, The first, in Scot-
Prison& of 'war in Edinburgh
Privy C&ud, Imd Keeper of the,
Proctor John thecartoonist,III. 82
Project' for :urprising Edinburgh
Promisc;ous dancing, Presbyterian
Property Investment Society, I. 123
Protestant Institute, I. zg , 11. z6a
Provost of Edinburgh, Salary and
privileges of the, 11. 281, 111.
270; his first appearance in official
decorations, 11. 282
Provost Stewart's Land. West Bow,
Lady 11. 163
in 1779, I. 318
land I. 142 255
Castle 11. a48
1. 370. 372
Castle I. 67
abhorrence of, I. 315
I. 325
Provosts of Leith, The, 111. q,
Provat's Close, 11. 277
Provost's House. Kirk+f-Field,
219, zm, 270
111.3
Publicopinionin Edinburgh, Weak.
ness of formerly I. 285
PuirFolks'Purses:The,I. 138, 11.6
Pulteney, Sir ames 1. 106 '' Purging *' o/ the Scottish army,
Furitan g&ner,Anecdote ofa, 1.56
Pye, Sir Robert, 111. 260, 261
111. 186 187
Q
Quadrangle, The, Holymod Palace,
Quality Street. Leith, III.2~1,235,
11. '76
. .
Q,';?ity Wynd, Rotten Row, Leith
Quarry Holes, The, 11. 101, zw
Queen Mary (sec Mary Stuart)
111. 173
111. 128, 133, 151
Queen Mary's Apartments, Holyrood
Palace 11. 66, * 67, 74 ; h u
bedchambei, ib.
Queen Mary's Bath, 11. 40, 41
!&.en Mary's Bower, Moray
House 11. *32 33
&een Mary's r&m Dungeon in
Edinburgh Castle below, I. *ZI,
,R
Q&en Mary's room, Rmeburn
House, 111. 103
Queen Mary's sundial 11. 68, 73
Queen Marys tree i1. 316; her
pear.tree, Mercdiston Castle,
Plate 26 ; her tree at Craigmillar
Castle 111. 59 *60 . Queen itreet, iI. 115, 151-158,
*16o 162 175 186 18 ,194, 199,
Que& d e e t Gardens, 11.185~194.
&eenptreet, k i t h , III.r73,qo,
Queen's Dock Leith 111. 283 285
Queen's Drivi, The, \. XI, 11.'303.
ZW ;U2 d83, iI8, i72, III. 74,106
am
ueen Street Hall 111. 88
231, 232
312
Brigade, 1. 286
the, Ptate 23
turret near the I. * 49, 78
11. 17
Queen's Edinburgh Rifle Volunteer
Queen's Park, Volunteer review in
Queen.s Post, Ancient postern and
Queen's Theatre k d Opera Houl,
Queen $ctoria'svisit to Edinburgh,
11. 354, 362
Queensberry, Duke of, I. 162. 164,
11. 8, 35, 38, 225, 226, 351, 111.
Queensberry Duchess of I 155,
11. 37 ; herleccentric habh,.II. 38
Quernsbeny Earl of, 11. a53
Queensberry'House, Canongate, I.
1058 1'55, 327. 11. 10, 357 36, 37,
38; its present use, 11. 38
Queensberrv Lodge, 11. 38
Queensferry, I. 16, 19,II. 101. I!I.
Q u e e n 2 4 Road, 11. 115,185,sm,
Qneensferry Street, 11. 136
Qqhitncss John of, Provost, 11.278
Quince? +hornas de, 11. 135, 140,
246, 265,365
63,211, 306,307,314 ; theherrug
fishe at 111. p
207, 111. 255 - II.74,359
R
Rae Sir David 11. 26 203
~ a e l Sir Wildm 11. ;27, III. 33c
Rae: Lady, !I. &, 339
&burn, Sir Henry, I. 119, 159,
a y , 384, 11. 88, go. gz, xzz,1z6,
his stepdaughter, 111. 77
Hadical Road," The, 11. II
I. 285
11. 188
187. 188, 111. 7lr 74, 6, 77, 140;
Raeburn Place, 111.79
Railston Bishop of Dunked, 11.54
Railway;, their influence foreseen,
Ramsay, Allan (see Allan Ramsay:
Ramsay, Allan, the painter, 1. 83,
Ramsay, Sir Alexander 11. 206
Ramsay, Sir Alexander,'Provost, I.
Ramsay of Dalhousie. Sir Alex.
y s Close, 11. I8
'99
ande;, I. 24, 25, 111.354, 355
Ramsay of Abbotshall, Sir Andrew.
I. 311, 11. 74 ; Lord Provost, 11.
,281
Ramsay, Sir George I. 162
Ramsay, Sir John, IiI. 42
Ramsay of Balmain, Sir John, 11.
Ramsay, Sir William 11. 166
Ramsay of Dalhousii, Sir W i l l i i
239
111.94
Ramsay, William, banker, 11. 362
111. 124
Ramsay, Cuthbert, I. 258
Ramsay Dean 11. 126, 205, 206
portrait of, 1;. * 128
Ramsay, Duel between Sir Georgq
and Capt. Macrae, 111. 13-14,
Ramsay, General John, I. 83, I1
I28
camsay, Lady, and Capt. Macrae,
<amay Lady Elizabeth 111.32
Zamsay: Miss Christian,'her fondcamsay,
The Misses, 111. 138
camsay Garden, I. 83, 11.82 ; view
camsay Lane, 1. 87. 91
camsay Lane, Portp,bello 111. *153 <amsnpS, Peter, White Horse
<am$y's Fort, Leith, 111. 171
tandolph Earl of Moray 11.47
candolph' Sir Thomas ; successful
re-captlre of the Castle by, 1. 24
candolph Cliff, 111. 70,75. f'tate 28
candolph Crescent, I. 237, 11. 11.5,
ZW, 2057 2071 20% 209
bnkeillor Street 11. 39
cankenion Club,'The, 11.180
lavelrig, 111. 334
tavelrig Hill, 111. 331
<avelston, I. 331, Ill. 79, 106
tavelston House 111. 106, 108
<wen's Craig ri. 307
<awdon Lad;Elizabeth, 11. 18
<ay Jdhn rectur of the high
Sc~ool, Ii. 290
<eade,Charles, thenovelist, 111.303
ieay George Lord II. 272, 111.8
<ay: Lady ElLabTeth Fairlie, 12
tecord of Entails, I. 372
cedbraes manor-house, 111. 88, 89. * 93. its changes, 111. p ' !&gauhet," References to, 11.
<edhallCastle, 111.313; themanor
tedheughs, 'I he 111. 114,31g,33r
<ed House The' 11. 330
teed. Robert. K'inp's architect. 11.
111. 139--14I
ness for cats, 11. 18
from Princes Street, Pidr 17
Inn ' 1. zgg
272, 346
270
house, 11.43
R&rig, KLdS of, 111. 134, 135,
Restalrig Lwh, 111. 13
Keston Lord, 11. 199
Restodtion festivals 11. 334
Restoration of Cha;les II., Popularity
of the, I. 55, '59, 176, 11.
334
Restoration of James VII., Plots
for the I. 66
Review dfScottish Volunteers, 1860,
11. 284.354 ; Plate 23
RevoliitionClub,The, 111. s a 3 ; i t ~
meLI, I. *63 .
168 ... OLD AND NEW' EDINBURGH. 'Plague in Leith, The 111. 180,186 Plainstane's close ~ i . 235 Playfair, Dr. Lyo;, ...

Vol. 6  p. 386 (Rel. 0.15)

16171,782 283, 335, 343 343
III, 140; dew of, II. 169
vanous buildings in, 11. 172; it!
early residents, 11. 166
St. Andrew Street 11. I 160, 161
St. Andrew's Stree;, LeitcIII. 226
m71228 234
St. Ann, the tailors' patron saint, I.
23
St. Rnne-s altar Holyrood 11. 58
in St. Giles'sbhurch I1.'266
St. Anne's altar, St.' Cuthbert'r
Church, 111. 94
St. Anne's Yard, 11. 76,79,3~3,3q
St. Anthony's Chapel Arthur s Seat,
I. 3 6 ; ruinsof, li. *3m *321
St. Anthony's Fire, or &ipelas,
111. 215 216
St. Anthoiy's Hermitage, I. m, 11.
303, 19, 111. 216
St. Ant%ony's Port, Leith, 111.151
SI. Anthonys preceptory, Leith,
its seal,
St. Anthonir Street, Leith, 111.
St. Anthony's Well, 11. 312, 319,
St. Anthony's Wynd,Ldth,III.z~s
St. Augustine Chapel of 11.53
St. Augustine4 Church i. zgz.zg4
St. Bennet's, Greenhill,' 111. 54
SL Bernard's Chapel, 111.75
St. Bernard's Church, 111. 75
St. Bernard's Crescent, 111. 71. p,
St. Bernard's parish, 11. 92, 135,
St. Bernard's Row, 111. 94, 97
St. Bernard's Well, III.74,75. *76,
178, 17% 2yi, ~2
111. 131, 175, 176, 215
111. '216 217 298
"178 V a
322
73, 79,81
111.77
78
58,251. !II. 49
0s LI. #5
St. Catharine's altar, Holymod, 11.
St. Cathenne of Sienna, Convenl
St. Cecilii hall, I. 151, *a5z, II.
St. Christopher's altar, St. Giles's
St. Clair Lord 1. 16g
St. Clai;of St.'Clair, General, 111.
175
Church, 11. 264, 111. a
n z
St. Clair of Roslin William, 11.
354 (sec sinclair dar~ William)
St. colme Street '11. 105
St. Columba's Ekcooal Church. I. . *
9 5 .
Church, 11. 6 3 , 264
St. Crispin's altar, St. Giles's
St. Cuthbert, Bishop of Durham,
11. 13r
295
St. Cuthben's chapel of ease, 11.
St. Cuthben's Church. Pkatc I. I.
incumbents, 11. 131;. the old
manse, 11. 132 ;demolition of the
old church, 11. 134, 136 ; erection
of the new building, 11. 134 ; the
old and new churches, 11. 131
'133, * 136, * 137 ; burials unde:
thesteeple 11. 135; theoldpoorhouse,
11.'135, 111. 83
St. Cuthbert's Free Church, 11.225
St. Cuthbert's Lane, 11. 335
St. David Street, 11. 16r, '65
St. David's Church, 11. ar6
St. Eligius, patron of the hammermen,
11.962
St. Eloi, 11. 263: carved groin
stone from Chapel of, St. Giles's
Church, I. * 147, 11. 262
St. Eloi's eo-. 11. 262
St. George's 'Church: Charlotte
St. Georie's Episco$l chapel, 11.
Square 11. 115, 126 173, 175
'90
St. Geor e's Free Church, 11. 138,
St. George's Well 111. 75
St. Giles, the pation saint of Edinburgh,
I. 138, 141, 254: seal of,
I. * 140 ; procgsiou of the saint's
relics I. 140
St. GilehChurch, 1. *I, 42,47, so,
51, 52.55, ~ 6 7 8 ~ 9 4 , IV. xm, Iax,
123, 138-147, 152, 18% 186, rga,
11. 15, 957 234, 3167 37% 111. 31,
z10,115. 75
GENERAL INDEX.
51, 173, 184; its early history
I. 138 139; the Norman door
way, i. 139, 141' the Preston
relic, I. 140; Sir DAvid Lindesaj
on the rocessionists, I. 141,
chapel ofsobert Duke of Albany:
I. 142; funeral of the Regent
Murray, I. 143; the "gude
Regent's aisle," rb. ; the Assem.
blyaisle, I. 144; disputes between
am- VI. and the Church party, I. 144,146'departureofJamesVI.
I. 146 ; Haddo's hole, ib. ; thi
Napier tomb, id. ; the spire and
lantern, I. '144, 146; theclock
and bells, I. 146 ; the Krames, I.
147 ; restorations of 1878 ib. ;
the or an, ib. ; plan of St. kiles's
Churcf I. *1452 the High
Church' 1. *I 8 149; removal
of hone;: from f f. 384
3t. Giles's Chdchyard, I. 148, 149,
157 11. 379
31. Ghes's Grange, 111. 47, 49, 52,
54 ;, its vicar, 111. 49
3t. Giles's Kirkyard, 11. 239
3t. GilesStreethow PrincaStreet).
I. 286 11. 11;
3t. Gd&s Street, Leith, 111. 223,
226 234
3t. Jimes's chapel, Newhaven, 111.
216, 295, 298, p; remains of,
3t. James'schapel,Leith, III.*240,
111. 297
243
3t. ams'sOpw=opalchapel 11.184
jt.jame~'sEp~opalChurcd,Leith,
111. *241, 243
3t. James's Square, I. 366. 11. 176, . _ _ . .~
19.
3t, lohn the Baotist's Chaoel. 111. . . si, 53
St. John's altar, St. Giles's Church,
II.26?,65
3t.John sCatholicChapel, Brighton
St. Johks chapel, Burghmuir, 111.
Place 111. 147
126, 134, d, 338, 383
3t. John's Established Church, I.
291
Leith 111. *n44
jt. John's Established Church,
jt. Johr;'s Free Church I. z 5, 314
Zt. John's Free Church,'Leiti, 111.
j t T p Hill I. 82
It. ohn's Stdet, 1. 325, 11. 2, 9,
jt. Katherine of Scienna, Convent
2, 53, 329 ; ruins of,
jt. Kathanne's altar, Kmk-of-Field,
jt. Katharine's altar, St. Margaret's
It. Katherine's chapel, Currie, 111.
jt. Katherine's estate, 111. 330
it. Katharine's Place, 111. 54
it. Katharine's Thorn, 11. 363,
it. Katherine's Well, Liberton, 111.
25, 26 27, 31, 111. 63
of 111. 51
IiI. *S4 ; 12 history, ib. ; seal of,
111. *55.
111. I
chapel, Libaton, 111. 53
332
111.54
328, 3291 330
chapel of I 383, 384
it. Leonard, Suburb of, I. 382;
it. Leonard's 'craigs, I. 75, III. 27,
142
it. Leonard's Hill, I. 55, 384, 11.
34 ; combat near, I. 383
it. Leonard's, Leith, 111. 227
it. Leonard's Kirkyard, 11.379
it. Leonards Loan, I. 383
it. Leonard's Well, 111. 89
it. Leonard's Wynd, 11. 54
it. Luke's Free Church, II.r53,.r55
it. Magdalene's Chapel, I. 240
it. Margaret, I. 16, 18, I
it. Margaxet's Chapel, adinburgh
Castle, I. 19, *zo, 76; chancel
arch of I. *24
it. Margset'sconvent, III.45,'48
it. Margaret's Loch, 11. 319
it. Margaret's Tower, Edinburgh
it. Margaret's Well, Edinburgh
Cade. I. 36, 48, 78
Castle, I. 49
St. Margaret's Well, Restalrig, 11.
St. LIC~ chapel &nLtarian), II.
11, 313, 111. I2 131
214
St. Mark's Episcopal chapel, Port*
bello 111. 147 *153
St. M L j Magdhene chapel, New
Hailes 111. 149, 366
St. M& Magdalene's Chapel, 11.
258, 261, 26a *a64' mterior 11.
264 : tabled on the walls,' 11.
262 *268
St. MkMagdalene's Hospital, 11.
26r, 262
St. Mary's Cathedral 11. 116, 211;
exterior and interior, 11. *ZIZ,
'213
St. Mary'sChapel, Niddry's Wynd,
St. M&s Ckpel, broughton
Street, I. z6z
St. Mary's Church, South Leith,
111. 130, 135, 182, 196, *217,218,
* z ~ o 222 244 ; its early hatory,
I. 247 251, 298 11. 26
III.;I8 :19
St. Mary'; Convent I. 107,382
St. Mary's Free Ch$ch 11. 184
St. Mary's Hos ita1 I. :97
St. Mary's-in-t\e-$ield 11. '34
251, 252, III. 1 7 ; its history:
111. I, a
St. Mary's parish church, 11. 191 ;
school-house, 111. 87
St. Mary's Port, 1. 382
St. Mary's Roman Catholic chapel,
St. Maryi Street' I. p 11. 238
St. Mary'sWynd,' 1.38, A, 217,219,
274. 275 * 29.298,2 I 335,375
382, 11. ;3, 249.~84~1%. 6 ; door!
head in 1. *3m
St Matth:w'sWell, Roslio,III. 3 I
St. Michael's Church, Inveres?c,
St. Nicholas Church North Leith,
111. 168, 176, 187 :its demolition
by Monk, 111. 187 255
St. Nicholas Wyud, fII. 256
St. Ninian's altar, St. Giles's
Church, 111. 119
St. Ninian's Chapel, I. 364, 111.72
St. Ninian's Church, North Leith,
11. 47, 111. 167 *I# 251 aga;
pe,tv tyrann in, iii. 25;; its
ministers IIE 254, 2 5 5 ; now a
g r a n a r y , ' ~ ~ ~ . 254,255
St. Niuian's Churchyard 111. *256
Sc. Ninian's Free Churih, North
Leith, 111.255
Si. Ninian's Row, I. 366,II. 103,176
St. Patrick Square, 11. 339
St. Patrick Street, I. 366, 11. 346
St. Patricks Romao Catholic
Church, 1. 278, 11. 249
St.Paul's Chapel,CarmbWsClo,
I. 239 *a40
St. Pads Episcopal Chapel, I. 278
St. Paul's Episcopal Church, York
Place, 11.60,188,198,248
St. Paul's Wark, 11. 101
St. Peter'sChurch,RoxburghPlace,
11. '79' school 11. 326
111.149
11. 338
St. Peter's Close 11. 255
St. Peter'sEpiscdpal Church,II1.51
St. Peter's Pend, 11. 255
St. Roque, 111.47 ; legends of, 111.
46,47
St. Roque's Chapel, Rurghmuir,
111.47, ?g : ruins of, Ill. *48
St. Roque s Day 111. 47
St. Roque's KirI&rd, 11. 379
St. Salvator's altar, St. Giles's
St. Staphhs Church, 111. * 81,83,
St. Thomas's Epkopal Chapel, 11.
Church 111. 35
85
. . - .
St?homas's Church, Leith, 111.
St. Tkdudna, 111. r p ; Church of,
St. Vincen't strhet, III. 83
Stafford Street, 11. 211
Stage, The, in Edinburgh, I.
247 248 '253
III.rz8 130 '3'
352
Stagesoaches, Establiihment of,
11.15, 16,235,236; the Glasgow,
11.121
Stained-glass window P a r l i i e n t
House 1. 159 Plati6
stainh0u;e. La;d of, I. 1:9*
389
Stair, Earlof, I. p, 94,37 , 11. 38,
95, 167, 327, 348, 358, h. 3%
367
E.W~ Stair, I. 103,
Stair, Eliiheth Countess of 1. xrn
-106 17r, 111. 41 ; the "Iavic
mirrd "1.103; hermarriagewrth
Stamp duty, In0uence of the, on
newspapers, I. 284,285
Stamp Office, I. 234,267
Stamp Office Close, I. *ng, 231,
232 ; execution there, 1.2%
Standard Life Assurance Company,
11. '3
Stantied tragedy The I. 281
ztanley, Star and the Garter" acto:, 1. tavern ;30 I. 187
Steam communication iivd~eith to
Stedman Dr. John 11.301
Steele, sir Richard,,l: 106
Steil Pate, the musicin, I. 251
Stenkor Stenhouse, 111.339
Steveu Rev. Dr,, the historm of
the high School, 11.11 287, a88,
289, 291:296,35Sr 3&?11- 135
Stevenlaws Close 11.242
Stevenson, Dr. Ahibald, 11. 144
147
Stevenson, Duncan, and the Beacm
newspaper, I. 181, 182 11.241
Stevenson Dr. John I d 18 19~27
Stewart &hibald 'Lord Phvost,
I. 318, 322, 32;) 11. 280, 283;
house of I. 318 * 325
Stewart ojAllanbLk, Sir John, 11.
26
Stewart Sir Alexander, I. 195
Stewart' of Colmess, Sir J ~ C S ,
Provost, 11. 281,111. 340
Stewart, Sir ames, I. 1r7
stewart of &trees Sir Jmi-
I. 229, 111. 34-3;~ ; his h o d
in Advocate's Close, I. *223, Ill.
30' Sir Thomas ib.
Stewah Sir Lewis '111. 364
Stewariof Monk&, Sir Williim,
Murder of I. 196,258, 259, 74
Stewart of 'Grantully, Sir john,
Stewart of Grantully, Sir George,
11. 350; his marriage, 111.90
Stewart, Dugald, I. 106, 156, 11.
17, 39, 120, 168, 195, m~r 2 3,
111.20,55; gray of II. 29 ; his
father, 111.20 ; h e cife, 11. 206 :
her brother, 11. 207; Dugalds
monument 11. III
Stewart Jades 111.79
Stewart'of Gariies, Alexander, 11.
225
Stewart Belshes of Invermay, Sir
John, 11. 383.
Stewart, Daniel, 111. 67; hospital
of, id.; ne* from Drumsheugh
London, 111. 2x1
11. 97 117, 128,13 , 151,175, ZIO
Steel, si; John,scuiptor, I. 159,372.
11. 351
grounds, 111. *68
road, 'I. 3%
3 d
111.221
Stewart Robert, Abbot of Holy-
Stewart of Castle Stewart 11. 157
Stewart ofGarth, Genera;, 11. 150,
Stewart of Strathdon, Sir Robert,
Stewart Colonel ohn, 11. 350
stewart' hptain Eeorge, 11.257
Stewart: Lieut.Colone1 Matthew,
Stewart, Captain James, I. 195, I@
Stewart of W t r e e s , I. 6a
Stewart, Execution of Alexander,
Stewart Lady Margaret 111. n I
Stewart'of lsle Mn., 11.' 162
Stewart, Nichblson, the actor, I.
Stewartfield manor-how, 111. 88,
Stewart s Hospital, 11. 63, 111.67
Stewarth oysteehouse, i. I m
Stirling, Enrls "f T I ? E
Stirliig
stirling gi ~ e w a I. 44 42 11.223
stirliig: sir w&, Lord Rovost,
Stirling of Kek, Sir William, 11.
158 ; h e daughter, 111.35
Stirling, General Graham, I I. 153
Stirling, Mrs., actRsq I. 35f
11. d
a youth, 11. 231
343
91, * 93
11. ~ $ 2 283, 391
I. 374 ... 283, 335, 343 343 III, 140; dew of, II. 169 vanous buildings in, 11. 172; it! early residents, 11. ...

Vol. 6  p. 389 (Rel. 0.15)

GENERAL INDEX. 387
Rhind. David. architect. 11. 147
275, '2 6, I I t . 67 244 .
Rhmd, {anet, ToAb of, 11. 262
Riccarton, 111. 319; its loca
history, 111. 321
Riccarton House 111. 322
Richard 11. of E h a n d . 11. 2
Richardson, Messrs., tobacconists
Richardson, W.L.,theartist, 111.8:
Richmond Court 11. 338
Richmond Stree; 11. 188 333, 332
Riding School ?he 11. 1>8
Riding School'Lani, 11. 135
Riddell's Close, I. 110, 1rr,z82, ng:
Riddell's Land, I. 98, 110, 11. 9
Riddle Sir Jama 11. 187 194
Riddle's Close, Liith, 111: 226, 22(
Ri ht of sanctuary, Edinburgt
tastle deorived of the. I. 67
111. 34
, ,
Rillbank IiI. 55
Riots at ;he Cananmills, 111. 87
Risps, or ancient knockers, I. 94
237, 271, 11. 253
35'
Ristori, Madam, the actress, I
Ritchie, the sculptor, 11. 134, 147
336
Ritchie, hitch, 111. 79
Ritchie, Prof. Uavid 11. rg6
Ritchie. William. iditor of thq
Scoto;mm, I. 284
of the Scottish bank note: RE25 and 5s.. 11. 94
Rirzio, David, Murder of, I. 6, 50
92. 3173 11. 41, 58, 66,68, 70, 71
92; abude of. 11. 11,111. 361
Rivio Joseph 11. 68, 70,
Robe4 Abbot)of H~lyrood,~II. 3
Rober;[., 11. 307, 111. 35, 94, 166
Robert II., I. 26, 27. 142, 11. 3
Robeh III., I. 27, 11. 54,111. 317
Robert Bruce, I. 23,24,III. 199,34:
Robert Gourlays house, 1. 116
327,343, 348
323 338, 348.354. 362
331, 354, 355
278, 111. 32, 59, 118, 166, 315
*rao 123 &. David. the oainter. 11. 80 Robei
III. +, 83; his p;rents,lI~. 7;
78; his birthplace, 111. -77, 78
Robertson, Patrick, Lord, 11. 156
175, 191, 193, 19% zoo, 111. 126
240; Lockhart's description 0:
him, 11. I 3 ; Lockhart'sepitaph:
an him, I?. 194
Robertson, Dr., I. 101, 231, 236
271, 273, 11. 27, 194: tomb of
11. * 381. (See also the two fol
Iaving articles)
Robertson, Principal, 1. 106, 261
(See tkc $re.
11. 255, 281, 24% 293. 378, 379
111. 20, 22, 23,45.
ceding andfolrauing artider)
Robertson, the historian, 11. 168
his death, 111. 49; his materna
niece, Lord Brougham's mother
11. 168. (See the two precedizg
Robertson Memorial Estahlishec
Chutch, 111. 50
Robertson, Dr., the Leith historian
111. 167, 173, 218, 219, zzo, 222
226, zA, 229, 23r. 235, 236, 238.
239,245, 2471 249, 256, 259:
2697 2701 276
Robertson Mr I. 175
Robertsonlof zochart, George, I.
204 206
Robekson of Lude, Lieut.-General.
111. 34 ; his black Servant, ib.
Robertson, Geordie, 11. 3'6
Kcbertson, John, and the lepers,
11. I02
Robertson Mrs. Hannah reputed
grand-diughter of Chahes II.,
Robertson's Close, 11. 250, 251
Robertson's Land, I. 178
"Robin Hood,"Gameof, forbidden,
I . 116, 277 ; riot in wnsequence,
II.21,355
1. 126
"Robin Mend-the-Market," 111.
274
RobRoy, 111,9r; thesonsof,I.70;
popularity of the play of, I. 349,
350
Rob Roy's purse, 11. 87
Rohinson, Professor, 11. 86, 191
Rohinson's Land, I. 264
FWwn, the actor, I. 351
Rocheid of Inverleith, Sir James, I
Rocheid family The 111. 94
Rocheid of 1n;erleith James, 111.
95 ; his encounter d t h the Duke
of hlontaw, ib. ; his mother, ib.
111.94, 343
architect. 11. 184
5, 6
Rollinson, the comedian, I. 350
Rollo, Lord, I. 208
Rollock, Hercules, 11. 288, 289
Rullock of Pilton Peter 111. 307
Rollock Robert,' PrinApal of the
Univirsity, I1 -78,111.8,9,16,2
Roman CatholicJchapels attacked
by the mob, 11. 282
Roman Eagle Hall I. IrI
Romanism, BurleAue on 11. 289
Roman relics and coins i. 10
Roman road near Portdbello. I. 10. . . * I2
I. +I0
319
Roman urn foundnear DeanBridge,
Romieu, Paul, the clockmaker, I.
Rood Chapel, Broughton, 111. 151
Rose, Bishop Alexander, 11. 22,
Rosebery, Archibald Earl of, I.
Rosebery Earls of I. g 111. 106
Rosebery: Lord, IiI. :5, 3 5
Rosebery James Ear? of, ?I. 324:
singula; advertisement, ib.
Rosehaugh, the persecutor, 11. 331,
375
Rosehaughs Close I. 253 25
Rose Court, Georie Stree;, If. 1x8
Rosehill, DavidLord, 111. 30
ROM Street, 11. 146, 158, 159, 163,
Rose Street Lane, 11. 150
Rosebank Cemetery, 111. 89
Roseburn Howe 111. I-, 103,
*104; lintel at: III. *Io3; 111-
scriptions at, ib.
Roseburn Mqltings, 111. 102
Rosevale Place 111. 266
Roslin Castle, iII. 346, 3 , *348,
351 ; its early history, 141. 347-
s p ; the St. Clairs (Sinclairs),
111. 131
2572 11. 1042 109
96
say, D a d ) ' ;, Lords, I. 66, 11.326, 339,111.
362
Ross of Hawkhead, Lord, 111.260
Ross, John Earl of I. 247
ROSS David comedian, I. 341, 342
Koss: Walte:, the antiquary, I. 230,
Ross House 11. 338, 339
Ross Park iI. 338, 339
Rosslyn. Earls of, I. 271-273, 111.
33% 111. 71-73
349-
Rosr's Court I. 91
Ross's Towe:. or " Follv."
Rothes, Earls of, I. 159, 11. p, 218,
Rothesay, Duke of, 1. 26, 27. 142,
Rothesay, Earl of, 11. 65
Rothesay Place, 111. 62
Kothiemay, Lady, 1. 281
Rotten Row, Leith, 111. 167. 235
Kotunda The 11. 83
Roubilkk, the'sculptor I. 159
Routing Well, The, 11). 364
Row, Colonel Archibald, I. zoz ; his
wife s tomb, 1. 203
Row, the Church hiatorian, 111.260
Rowites The I. 239
Rowland Hili, the preacher, 11. 103
Roxburgh, Dukes of,I. 128,223,Il.
' 5 , '23
Roxburgh, Earls of, I. 223, 11. 3,
15,50,181,111.57; houseof 11.34
Roxburgh, Dr., botanist, IIi. 162
258
11. 47, 243. 111. 31, 32
Roxburgh Close I. 223
Roxburgh Club,'I. 375
Roxburgh parish 11. 135
Roxburgh Place 'I. 362 111 338
Roxburgh Terrice, 11. j38
Royal apartments in Holpood
Xowl dank. I. 217. 222, 24% 11.
Palace Piate 15
Fro 115, 136 170"171 *17a'
the, 1. 182
335337 *?40
*IQ) its curator 111. 98
111. 71
b y a i Bank Ciose, iI1. h 4 ; fire in
hsyal Blindksylum andschool, 11.
Royal Bo;anic Gardens, 111. gb,
Royal kircus, 11. '195, 199, *ZOI,
Royal Collegeof Physicians, I. 362,
11. 247
Royal Company of Archers 11.348
3, 354; their hall, Ii. * 3 y :
Royal Crescent 111. a6
Royal Edinbuigh Asylum, 111.
25,53
39
Royal Edinburgh Volunteers, I. 63,
Royal Exchange, The, I. 79, 183-
187, *r8 191, 228, 229, a42, 255,
11. 281 ?I]. 125 ;.plan of the, I.
* t 8 8 ; ;he Council Chamber, I.
11. 307. *377, 111. 105, 264
184, 186, Pkfc 7; back of the
Royal Exchange, Plafe 10
Royal family, Submission by the
Jacobites to the, 11. 247
Royal gardens, Holyrood Palace,
11. "65 *69, 9
Royal H~ghlanJ Society, 111. 127
Royal Horse Bazaar 11.225
Royal Hotel, 11. I&; its distinguhhed
guests, ib.
Royal Infirmary, 11. 146, 147, 28r,
282,296, 298-302, 359, 111. 114;
thenewbuilding 11.358,359,*361
Royal Institution,'The, 11. 83, 86,
88. 01. 0 2 : in 1810. 11. *84: at ..
present -11. "85 ='
Royal Lhth Volunteers, The, 111.
198, 264
burgh Castle, I. 32, 36, *68
Royal Life Guards 11. 217
Royal lodging, 0; palace, Edin-
Roval Maternitv Hosnital. 11.2'1
Royal Maternity and $impson hie-
Royal Medical S&iety, I. 123, 11.
morial Hospital 11. 362
yx.303, 111. 266, 311
Royal Riding School, 11. 334, 335
Royal Scots Grey Dragoons I. 64
Rqyal Scottish Academy, 11:86,88,
Royal Scottlsh Naval and Military
Royal Scotkh Volunteer review,
Royal Society, l h e , 11. 83, 86, 204,
89, 9x7 921, I97
Academy 11. 335
11. 320, 354. Plate 23
111. 77
~Oy.2 Terrace 11.103
Royal Terrace'Gardens, 111. 158
Royal tournaments, I. 35
Royston, Lord I. rrr,273,III.310,
311 ; eccenhc pranks of his
daughter, I. 111,135,III.11q, 312
Royston, III.308,310
Koyston Ca5tle, 111. 311
Ruddiman, Thorn=, grammarian,
I. 110, 123, 11. 291, 382, 111. 363
Ruddiman, theprinter, 11.310,III.
Ruglen, Earl of, 111. 122, 3'7
Ruins of the old Market Closeafter
Rule, Principal Gilbert, 111. 14, 16
Rullion Green, 111. p. 334. *337
Rumhold, Richard, 1. 59, 60
Runciman. the oainter. I. oz. axo.
363
the fire, I. *177.
Russell Bishop of Leith 111. 187
Russell: Rev. 'Dr. h d a e l , 111.
Russell the actor I. 350
Rutheriord, Lord: 11. 98, 174, 111.
RutAerford Sir John 11. 356
Rutherford: Alison, iI. 156
Rutherford, Andrew, 11. 156
Rutherford, Dr., the fint inventor
243
68 ITI
of gas, I. 274, 276, 11. 383; hu
nephew, Sir Walter Scott, I. 276
Rutherford the botanist 11. 1zo
Rutherford: Anne(Si WAterScott's
mother) 11. 142
Rutherfurd-Clark, Lord, 111.26
Ruthven David Lord I. 178
Ruthven: Williarn Loh I. 6 206
215, 316, 11. 66, 70, 71; II1.'174!
his dagger I. 317
Ruthven Si; Patrick, I. 52, 54, 95
Ruthven' the printer 11.18 111.271
Ruthven's Land L i d I. 5x6
Rutland Street, \I. I$, zog
Ryan, the actor, 11.23
S
Sabbath, Breaches of the, 11. 132,
Sadler Sir Ralph, 111. 154 20)
Sailin;, Early restrictions on, III.
I33
'59
ailors' Home, Leith, 111. a59
'Salamander Land," The, 1. 142
Salamander Street, Leith, 111. 239
Salisbury, Earl of I1 305
Salisbury Craigs, \. I&, 384,II. 60,
161, 303, 305, 34, 3'372 311. 111,
142
Salisbury Road 111. 55
Salmon, Charle;, the local poet, 11.
310
111. 164
Salmon Pool, The, Water of Leith,
Salt Backet The, 11. 178
Saltoun, h i d , 11. 343, 344
Fmpson's Grave,!I. 319
Sarnsou's Ribs, I. 11. 11. 312,
313
Sancto Claro, W i l l i de, 111. 35
Sanctuary Court-house, 11. 11
Sand Port Leith 111.171, 177,281
Sand PoriStreet' Leith 111. 259
Sandford Bishod 11. 1:6 111. 147
Sandford: Sir Dakel K. iI. 126
Sand-glasses, Use of, in law courts,
Sandiland, James, 111. 42
Sandilands, Sir James, I. 195, 245,
302 11. 47 65 111. 116
Sandhand's ho;e I 240
Saughton Bridge'IiI. 319, *3zo
Saughton Hall, iII. 19
Saughton House, I d . 3 9 , * 320; a
drunken brawl I11 19
Saughton Laan knd,'dl. 319
Saunders Street, 111. 76
Saxe-Coburg Place 111. 75
Schmitz, Dr.Leonhh, 11.111,III.
School House Wynd, 111.2
School Lane, 111. 28
Sciennes Court, 111. 54
Sciennes Hall 111. 51
Sciennes Hill house 111. 55
Sciennes b a n III. \4
Sciennes, The,' 111. 29, 50, 51, $2,
I. I72
81
Scott William Lord Stowell, I. 299
Scott: LordJdhn, 111. 322
Scott, Sir Gilbert, the architect, 11.
111, 213, 111. 243
Scott, Sir John, 1. 210
Scott, Sir Walter, I. 3, 7, 12, 7'. 75,
1077 '23,1% 1% 150, 1549 163.
166, 171,173, 179, 182, 211, 222, ... INDEX. 387 Rhind. David. architect. 11. 147 275, '2 6, I I t . 67 244 . Rhmd, {anet, ToAb of, 11. ...

Vol. 6  p. 387 (Rel. 0.14)

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Vol. 6  p. 385 (Rel. 0.14)

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Vol. 6  p. 373 (Rel. 0.13)

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Vol. 6  p. 390 (Rel. 0.13)


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