Old and New Edinburgh

Old and New Edinburgh

Volume IV

992 OLD AND NEW EDINBURGH. [The Old High School. the great William Pitt, afterwards Lord Chatham. My master was a great favourite of his pupils, about sixty in number. &cond.-Gilchrist, a good-humoured man, with a great deal of comedy about him ; also liked by the class, in number somewhat exceeding Farquhar's. " Third-Rae, a severe, harsh-tempered man, but an excellent scholar, a rigid disciplinarian, and very frequent floggerof the school, consequently very unpopular with the boys, though from the reputation were then removed to the Rector's class, where they read portions of Livy, along with the other classics above mentioned. The hours of attendance were from seven to nine a.m., and after an interval of an hour for breakfast, from ten to twelve ; then after an interval of two hours (latterly, I think, in my time, three) for dinner, returned for two hours in the afternoon. The scholars wrote versions, translations from Latin into English ; and at the annual examination in August rkited speeches, as of his superior learning, he had more scholars than either of the above masters. Aurfk-Gib, an old man, short and squabby, with a flaxen three-tailed wig, verging towards dotage, though said to be in his younger days a very superior scholar, and particularly conversant in Hebrew. He had then only twenty-five or thirty pupils, who liked him from the indulgence which his good-natured weakness and laxity of discipline produced. "The scholars went through the four classes taught by the under-masters, reading the usual elementary Latin books-for at that time no Greek was taught in the High School-and so up to Virgil, Horace, Sallust, and parts of Cicero. They they were called, being extracts of remarkable passages from some of the Roman poets. Of eminent men educated at the High School were most of the leading lawyers of Scotland. In modem times were President Hope, Mr. Brougham, Mr. Francis Horner, Mr. Wilde, the great favourite of Mr. Burke, hfr. Reddie, town clerk of Glasgow, who, during the short time hewas at the Edinburgh bar had a high reputation for his ability and knowledge of law. Lord Woodhouselee was at the school with me, in the class below mine; so was Lord Meadowbank, who had for his tutor Mr. Adam, afterwards rector. The Chief Commissioner Adam was of the same standing and class." In 1765 began the connection of the eminent *
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