Old and New Edinburgh

Old and New Edinburgh

Volume IV

Volume 4 Page 312
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Well from Restalrig, where it had been all hut buried under the workshops of the North British Railway ; but now a limpid perennial rill from the Craigs flows into its ancient basin, the Gothic archway to which is closed by an open iron gate. The old solitude and amenity of the Hunter's Bog, after 1858, were destroyed by the necessary erection of four rifle ranges, two of 300 yards, and two of 600 yards, for the use of the garrison and DUDDINGSTON CHURCH (INTERIOR). volunteers, and the construction of two unornamental powder magazines. The danger signal is always hoisted in !he gorge known as the Hause ; the rocky ridge named the Dasses overlooks these ranges on the east. Leaving the Echoing Rock, an isolated eminence, and following the old road round the hill, under Samson's Ribs, a superb range of pentagonal greenstone columns sixty feet long by five in dkmeter, the Fox's Holes, and the rugged stony slope named the Sclyvers, we come to a lofty knoll named the Girnel Craig, and another named the Hangman's Craig or Knowe, from the following circumstance. About the reign of Charles II., the office of public executioner was taken by a reduced gentleman, the last member of an old 88 reprobate could not altogether forget his former tastes and habits. He would occasionally resume the garb of a gentleman, and mingle in the parties of citizens who played at golf in the evenings on Bruntsfield Links. Being at length recognised, he was chased from the ground with shouts of execration and loathing, which affected him so much that he retired to the solitude of the King's Park, and was next day found dead at the bottom of a precipice, over which he is supposed to have thrown himself in despair. The rock was afterwards called the Hangman's Grae." The deep gorge between it and the Sclyvers is named the Windy Goule, and through it winds the ancient path that leads direct to the hamlet of Duddingston, which, with the loch of that name,'
Volume 4 Page 313
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