Old and New Edinburgh

Old and New Edinburgh

Volume V

Volume 5 Page 135
  Enlarge Enlarge  
OLD AND NEW EDINBURGH. [ Restalrig. them in my pocket and went up some public staircase to eat them, without beer or water. In this manner I lived at the rate of little more than fourpence a day, including everything." In the following season he lived in Edinburgh, and added to his baps a little broth. In 1760, when only in his nineteenth year, Adam-one of that army of great men who have made Scotland what she is to-day-obtained the head mastership of Watson's Hospital. This place was the patrimony of the Nisbet family, already referred to in our account of the ancient house of Dean, wherein it is related that Sir Patrick Nisbet of Craigantinnie, who was created a baronet of Nova Scotia in 1669, was subsequently designated '' of Dean," having exchanged his paternal lands for that barony with his second cousin, Alexander Nisbet. The latter, having had a quarrel with Macdougall of Mackerston, went abroad to fight a duel with 1Hti Huudr: OF THE LnGANS OF RESTALRIG, LOCH END. (PUYfh Uftter a Skr4ch by fhe Author J J I ~ C in 1847.) Year after year Restalrig was the favourite summer residence of the Rev. Hugh Blair, author of the well-known " Lectures on Rhetoric and Belles-lettres," who died on the 27th of December 1800. , A little way north-east of Restalrig village stands the ancient house of Craigantinnie, once a simple oblong-shaped mansion, about four storeys in height, with crowstepped gables, and circular turrets ; but during the early part of this century made much more ornate, with many handsome additions, and having a striking aspect-like a gay Scoto-French chheau-among the old trees near it, and when viewed from the grassy irrigated meadows that lie between it and the sea. him, in 1682, attended by Sir William Scott of Harden, and Ensign Douglas, of Douglas's Regiment, the Royal Scots, as seconds. .On their return the Privy Council placed the whole four in separate rooms in the Tolbooth, till the matter should be inquired into ; but the principals were, upon petition, set at liberty a few days after, on giving bonds for their reappearance. On the death of Sir Alexander Nisbet at the battle of Toumay, unmarried, the estates and title reverted to his uncle, Sir Alexander, who was succeeded by his eldest son Sir Henry ; upon whose decease the title devolved upon his brother Sir John, who died in 1776. In that year the latter was succeeded by his
Volume 5 Page 136
  Enlarge Enlarge     Pictures Pictures