Old and New Edinburgh

Old and New Edinburgh

Volume VI

Volume 6 Page 303
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304 OLD AND NEW EDINBURGH. [Newhaven. ~~~~~ ~ being inadmissible from the broad belt which supports the creel, that is, fish-basket, crossing the forehead. A sort of woollen pea-jacket with vast amplitude of skirt, conceals the upper part of the person, relieved at the throat by a liberal display of handkerchief The under part of the figure is endued upon a masculine but handsome form, notwithstanding the slight stoop forward, which is almost uniformly contracted-fancy the firm and elastic step, the toes slightly inclined inwardsand the ruddy complexion resulting from hard exercise, and you have the beau idiab of fishwives." REV. DR. FAIRBAIRN. (A&r a Photagrajh 6y John Mojat, Elnburgh.) invested with a voluminous quantity of petticoat, of substantial material and gaudy colour, generally yellow with stripes, so made as to admit of a very free inspection of the ankle, and worn in such numbers that the bare mention of them would be enough to make a fine lady faint. 'One half of these ample garments is gathered over the haunches, puffing out the figure in an unusual and uncouth manner. White worsted stockings and stout shoes complete the picture. Imagine these investments The unmarried girls when pursuing the trade of hawking fish wear the same costume, save that their heads are always bare. The Buckhaven fisher people on the opposite coast are said to derive their origin from Flemish settlers, and yet adhere to the wide trousers and long boots of the Netherlands; but there is no reason for supposing that those of Newhaven or Fisherrow are descended from any other than a good old Scottish stock.
Volume 6 Page 304
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