Old and New Edinburgh

Old and New Edinburgh

Volume VI

it, sixty feet wide, bordering the Albert and other docks, and, in addition to the edifices specially mentioned, contains the offices of the Leith Chamber of Commerce, instituted in 1840, and incorporated in 1852, having a chairman, deputy-chairman, six directors, and other officials ; the sheriff-clerk's office; that of the Leith Burghs PiZoi, and the offices of many steamship companies. At the north-east angle of Tower Street stands the lofty circular signal-tower (which appears in THE EXCHANGE BUILDINGS. son has a view of the door and staircase window of No, 10, which bears the date 1678, with the initials R.M. within a chaplet. In No. 28 is the well-known Old Ship Hotel, above the massive entrance of which is carved, in bold relief, an ancient ship ; and No. 20 is the equally well-known New Ship Tavern, or hotel, the lower flat of which is shown, precisely as we find it now, in the Rotterdam view of I 700, with its heavily moulded doorway, above which can be traced, several of our engravings), so long a leading feature in all the seaward views of Leith, and the base of which, so lately as 1830, was washed by the waves at the back of the old pier. It was originally a windmill for making rape-oil, as described by Maitland, and it is distinctly delineated in a view (seep. 173) of Leith Harbour about 1700, now in the Trinity House, to which it was brought by one of the incorporation, who discovered it at Rotterdam in 1716. Part of the King's Wark is also shown in it. What is called the Shore, or quay, extends from the tower southward to the foot of the Tolbooth Wynd, and is edificed by many quaint old buildings, with gables, dormers, and crowsteps. Robertthrough many obliterations of time and paint, a Latin motto from Psalm cxxvi, most ingeniously adapted, by the alteration of a word, to the calling of the house-"Ne dormitet custos tuus. Ecce non dormitat neque dormit custos domus" (Israelis in the original), which is thus translated-"He that keepeth thee will not slumber. Behold, he that keepeth the house (Israel) shall neither slumber nor sleep." The taverns of Leith have always.held a high repute for their good cheer, and were always the resort of Edinburgh lawyers on Saturdays. The host of the '' Old Ship I' is very prominently mentioned by Robert Fergusson in his poem, entitled '' Good Eating."
Volume 6 Page 245
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Volume 6 Page 246
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